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Christian

Barbeque Techniques

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I'm cooking beef ribs today on the grill, using the indirect heat method. I've only done this once before, and I overcooked the ribs, which were tasty anyway. Checking the ribs just now, I see that I'm repeating my mistake, but it's too early to pull them off and eat them. Not for another hour. I'd rather keep cooking them at the lowest heat level possible then pull them off, let them get cold, and have to re-heat them in an hour.

BTW, I have a gas grill.

Everything I know about how to BBQ comes from Dana Carpender's Low-Carb Barbecue Cookbook. It's no authority on the subject, and I'm, of course, no purist. But I like to grill, and, as with gardening, I keep thinking that THIS will be the year I embrace the subject and learn the basic techniques -- mops, rubs, chips (whatever you call those thing that you add for flavor; I've never done it!).

It's cold weather right now in the east, but spring will be here before we know it. Who wants to share their tips for grilling perfection?

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Alan, do you always cook over direct heat? (BTW, the grill thing -- we had a thread on that, didn't we? Is this thread duplicative? If so, you can close it out.)

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Charcoal. Hardwood lump. Gas assist to start. Indirect or direct, or direct then indirect depending on the grillee.

And Christian it sounds like you are wanting to BBQ the ribs, not grill them. Grilling ribs will only take an hour or so, even with indirect heat. But to truly BBQ them, you need a smoker, with separate chambers for the heat source and the meat. That takes hours.

Edited by Buckeye Jones

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I do a lot of grilling, cooking over mesquite coals. I have an abundant supply of mesquite on our land and it is great for grilling or smoking. I do some smoking or BBQing, mainly brisket and pork ribs. I also use mesquite for BBQing. Like Alan said, it takes a long time about an hour per pound and I try and keep the heat around 250 degrees in the firebox and put the meat in the upper compartment which just gets the heat and the smoke. It takes all day to cook a brisket but it sure is good.

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On the gas grill, you could wrap the ribs in foil. I copped the idea of making a foil pouch from Alton Brown. I make a pouch and add roughly half a cup of dark beer, seal and cook. ....I'm a little rough on time but I would say as low heat as possible (use a thermometer) and go until they are tender . Gas grills tend to be warmer so I would guess you will be at or around 350, with low heat with the ribs as far away from flame. Once they are pretty well done, unwrap and give them some fire, you could add sauce at the end.

Temps and time are left vague because everybodies grill works differently.

Mesquite...Brisket....Texas!.......MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!!!!!

I will be smoking Brisket for a Super Bowl Party. I brine my Brisket for 24 hours. I give it a rub of Kosher salt, brown sugar, black and red peppers, some herbs. I load my smoker with chunk Mesquite and do my best to keep the temperature at 200. The Brisket goes overnight, generally very close to 20 hours. Low and slow it is the key to BBQ.

I serve my Brisket dry, but might make a sauce and serve it on the side.

If I get ambitious and/or do what my wife wants... I will BBQ some ribs. I like to use baby backs. I like them best if you pull the membrane off. I give them a dry rub and leave them in the smoker usually 6-8 hours. Low and slow, low and slow...

Edited by mumbleypeg

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