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  • 1 year later...

I'm just listening to Tablula Rosa. I encountered Part for the first time a couple of years ago, when someone bought me a recording of Triodion - Ode VII - I am the true vine. I can see myself exploring Part's work over the new few years. This opening track, with Jarrett on piano, is stunning.

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Link to our thread on the documentary Arvo Pärt: 24 Preludes for a Fugue (2002).

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Wow, this is fabulous. I had no idea we had a Part thread. He is one of my favorite 20th century composers (if you don't believe me, take a look at my avatar :) ). His music is deeply influential to me as a composer, and as a composition student. I'm very fascinated by his music in the broader spectrum of mystic/holy minimalism, and love music by others from that field like Goriecki and Tavener, but I have a special regard for Part's music, as it was my introduction to that subset, and has played a very important part in my own compositional development. For me, even as a composition student, analyzing and listening to concert music from the 20th century can often be a pure force of will, an academic exercise (depending of course on the particular genre involved), but with Part, it's kind of all joy. There is little of his music that I don't truly love, save perhaps some of his early serial music. There are few modern composers who can so freely and powerfully write such transcendent music, and with such prolificacy. Anyway, a little fan boy gushing, but he is one of my heroes of composition. :)

I'm just listening to Tablula Rosa. I encountered Part for the first time a couple of years ago, when someone bought me a recording of Triodion - Ode VII - I am the true vine. I can see myself exploring Part's work over the new few years. This opening track, with Jarrett on piano, is stunning.

I'm assuming you're speaking of Fratres; beautiful piece. Jarrett's is definitely the most popular version, though I think I prefer the Martin Roscoe version (at least as far as the violin and piano instrumentation is concerned), for both aesthetic and technical reasons (to do with the recording quality). Nonetheless, any of the versions communicate the beauty of the piece. And of course, there are numerous versions with different instrumentation that have been done over the years (particularly beautiful is Fratres for 8 cellos). The piece also shows up in There Will Be Blood, which considering the visceral nature of both works of art, seems rather apropos.

Edited by Joel C

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  • 5 weeks later...

I got hold of the collection Alina, which has three versions of 'Spiegel der Spiegel' and two of 'Fur Alina'. I don't really have anything intelligent to say about it as yet, other than that it's helping me write my PhD, which is a godsend. Initially I found 'Spiegel' a little bland, but it's revealing more and more depth as I keep listening.

I also bought the collection 'Lamentate' but not got round to listening to it yet.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Great to see a Part thread! I first heard his work when an Estonian choir visited my choir in Oregon and performed a few of his pieces.

For a nice introduction, I recommend "Da Pacem"...a collection of works for choir and organ...including 'Da Pacem Domine', which is one of his best. While essentially a choral album, the album still demonstrates his unique approach to the organ, where the human voice and the organ seem almost to mimic one another.

For those interested in sacred modern Estonian choral music :), also check out Urmas Sisask. His #3 Mass is a lovely, austere thing. Modern sounding, but tonal enough for easy sight-reading. Good for a reasonably competent church choir.

So you ladies and you gentlemen, pull your bloomers on...

-Joe Henry

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  • 3 weeks later...

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