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Brave


Peter T Chattaway
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bowen wrote:

: Even better quality image (too big to embed here).

Really? A&F has been resizing super-big images for years to fit the width of my browser tab. Or does it do that only in Firefox?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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bowen wrote:

: Even better quality image (too big to embed here).

Really? A&F has been resizing super-big images for years to fit the width of my browser tab. Or does it do that only in Firefox?

If it doesn't scale the image, it screws up the layout, and if it does scale it, then it defeats the purpose of posting such a large image. Either way I think it is better posted as a link.

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Narrated by Shrek?

:lol:

Edited by opus

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
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Land of the Brave: How new Disney movie will put Scotland right on the map

Originally titled The Bear And The Bow, it's about the adventures of Merida, a feisty archery-loving Scottish princess voiced by Kelly Macdonald.

She is at odds with her controlling but loving parents King Fergus (Billy Connolly) and Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson) and gets in trouble with some magic which has consequences for the whole kingdom.

Mark said: "It's all about the relationship between a mother and daughter, and how this young woman has problems with her mother.

"When she has a problem with her mother over marriage, she gets a magic spell to try to stop her mother bothering her with the suitor business.

"But it actually changes her mother into a bear." . . .

Daily Record, June 30

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"When she has a problem with her mother over marriage, she gets a magic spell to try to stop her mother bothering her with the suitor business.

"But it actually changes her mother into a bear." . . .

Daily Record, June 30

Ack. Ack. I wish I hadn't read that. :(

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

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SDG wrote:

: Ack. Ack. I wish I hadn't read that. :(

Because you dislike the story's premise, or because you consider it a spoiler? (FWIW, if the director mentions it without any fanfare in an interview with a journalist a year before the film's release, I figure it can't be THAT much of a spoiler.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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All the previous Pixar films have been scored by Michael Giacchino (The Incredibles, Ratatouille, Up, Cars 2) or the Newman cousins (Randy scored the Toy Story trilogy, A Bug's Life, Monsters Inc. and Cars, as well as the Lasseter-driven The Princess and the Frog for Disney; while Thomas scored Finding Nemo and WALL-E).

But Brave will bring a new composer into the fold. Ladies and gentlemen ... Patrick Doyle, who has scored most of Kenneth Branagh's directorial outings (from Henry V to Thor) as well as Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, among others.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 month later...

Upcoming Pixar has the new extended synopsis that Disney recently released:

Since ancient times, stories of epic battles and mystical legends have been passed through the generations across the rugged and mysterious Highlands of Scotland. In “Brave,” a new tale joins the lore when the courageous Merida (voice of Kelly Macdonald) confronts tradition, destiny and the fiercest of beasts.

Merida is a skilled archer and impetuous daughter of King Fergus (voice of Billy Connolly) and Queen Elinor (voice of Emma Thompson). Determined to carve her own path in life, Merida defies an age-old custom sacred to the uproarious lords of the land: massive Lord MacGuffin (voice of Kevin McKidd), surly Lord Macintosh (voice of Craig Ferguson) and cantankerous Lord Dingwall (voice of Robbie Coltrane). Merida’s actions inadvertently unleash chaos and fury in the kingdom, and when she turns to an eccentric old Witch (voice of Julie Walters) for help, she is granted an ill-fated wish. The ensuing peril forces Merida to discover the meaning of true bravery in order to undo a beastly curse before it’s too late.

Directed by Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman, and produced by Katherine Sarafian, “Brave” is a grand adventure full of heart, memorable characters and the signature Pixar humor enjoyed by audiences of all ages. The film takes aim at theaters on June 22, 2012, and will be presented in Disney Digital 3D™ in select theaters.

A grand adventure full of heart, memorable characters and signature Pixar humor, “Brave” uncovers a new tale in the mysterious Highlands of Scotland where the impetuous Merida (voice of Kelly Macdonald) defies an age-old custom and inadvertently unleashes chaos, forcing her to discover the meaning of true bravery before it’s too late.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 months later...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Hmmm. Looks more like a Dreamworks project than a Pixar project at this point.

So strike up the chorus: "Never trust a Pixar trailer / They're usually far better than trailers let on / Remember Ratatouille and Toy Story 3 / and hope that from Cars 2 they've learned and moved on..."

Edited by Overstreet

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Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Possible spoiler ahead. (kinda / maybe) :unsure:

I find it interesting that there is a bear in the film, which it would seem is what the person turns into, as bears have always been practically non-existent in Scotland (at least to my understanding.)

On a bit of a side note there is a story in the hagiographies of st. Columcille (Latin - St. Columba .... who founded the Iona monastery) observing a huge "monster". Some people swear up and down that he saw the Loch Ness monster, and others say that he obviously didn't..... and what he saw was probably a bear. Which to him could have been an unknown, or at least unusual, creature.

Of course it was probably a giant woodland fairy ::blush::

But anyhow. The fact that they made the choice to put a bear in the film is intruiging. Is this coming from a North American sensibility that doesn't realize this understanding of bears in Scotland (which I kind of doubt), or is the fact that they chose to use a bear an important aspect of the story?

Edited by Attica
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Attica wrote:

: I find it interesting that there is a bear in the film, which it would seem is what the person turns into, as bears of always been practically non-existent in Scotland (at least to my understanding.)

Hmmm, interesting. Hadn`t thought about that before.

FWIW, a quick bit of Googling indicates that bears may have gone extinct in Britain (including Scotland) at some point towards the end of the first millennium A.D., after the Romans left ... but there ARE Scottish fairy tales like `The Brown Bear of Norway`, which concerns a prince who is transformed into a bear by a witch.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Attica wrote:

: I find it interesting that there is a bear in the film, which it would seem is what the person turns into, as bears of always been practically non-existent in Scotland (at least to my understanding.)

Hmmm, interesting. Hadn`t thought about that before.

FWIW, a quick bit of Googling indicates that bears may have gone extinct in Britain (including Scotland) at some point towards the end of the first millennium A.D., after the Romans left ... but there ARE Scottish fairy tales like `The Brown Bear of Norway`, which concerns a prince who is transformed into a bear by a witch.

Yeah that makes sense. I'll near guarantee that they are playing on some of those old fairy tales.

As someone who came from a family of highlanders that immigrated to Canada at the turn of last century, I've spent some time learning about them, and I expect that to a medieval Highlanders mindset the fact that there were once a small amount of bears which went to extinction, would be a perfectly good reason to make up fairy tales about how these bears were really just humans who had been transformed by witches. I would think that for them everything was a perfectly good reason to make up a good fairy tale.

Edited by Attica
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  • 3 months later...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RebelliousPrincess

Hope that the theme will be further explored than it looks like from here. The whole "Oh I'm independent marriage is for wimps!" thing is kind of an easy way to get modern audiences to sympathize with a lead female from a former time... like what they did with Alice's character in Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland. Anyway, I have high hopes still, but they had better do something new with the rebellious princess trope.

I like that she seems to have this cute rapport with her Dad.

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It actually looks pretty good. At least, it's the best thing we've seen from the film thus far.

I, too, worry that the lead character's desire for independence will be cliched and lack nuance, though.

@Timzila

"It is the business of fiction to embody mystery through manners, and mystery is a great embarrassment to the modern mind." (Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners).

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Well, as noted above, it seems this film will be largely about the relationship between the princess and her mother, which suggests that it is the MOTHER, rather than the father, who is trying to push her into an arranged marriage here. This might make it even MORE of a "women's movie" than it would have been if the princess had been rebelling against her father.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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