Jump to content
opus

Criterion sale at Barnes & Noble

Recommended Posts

opus   

Barnes & Noble is selling all Criterion titles, including Blu-Ray titles, for 50% off (60% off if you're a Barnes & Noble member).

I just picked up Au Hasard Balthazar, Brazil, Ikiru, Harakiri, and the Seven Samurai box set myself and I'll probably make another purchase when I get my next paycheck.

Get out your credit cards...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you imagine my disappointment when I found out B&N did not have the Criterion version of Armageddon available? Can you?!?!

Edited by Baal_T'shuvah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dang, Yesterday I was thinking, "Why do I have all those DVDs? I don't watch them. Maybe the 'buying movies' season of my life is behind me."

And now this, just as I expect a little extra cash in my pocket. That won't happen until the end of the month, though. Any idea how long the sale runs? I didn't see an end date on the site, but maybe I missed it.

It could be time to dip into Kaurasmaki. I've never seen any of his films, but a 3-film box set for $20 is a hard offer to resist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
opus   

The sale ends 8/2/09.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Combine with this coupon (expires the 15th, must be used in-store) and, if you've a B&N membership for 10% off, one could walk away with, say, Ingmar Bergman: Four Masterworks or Eric Rohmer's Six Moral Tales for about $34 + tax. Or Wings of Desire, Diary of a Country Priest, Days of Heaven, The Last Days of Disco, or Double Life Of Veronique for $13.50 . Or 10 Years Of Rialto Pictures for $50 & change. Etc., etc., etc....

Here's the coupon for B&N members.

Edited by du Garbandier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Combine with this coupon (expires the 15th, must be used in-store) and, if you've a B&N membership for 10% off, one could walk away with, say, Ingmar Bergman: Four Masterworks or Eric Rohmer's Six Moral Tales for about $34 + tax. Or Wings of Desire, Diary of a Country Priest, Days of Heaven, The Last Days of Disco, or Double Life Of Veronique for $13.50 . Or 10 Years Of Rialto Pictures for $50 & change. Etc., etc., etc....

Here's the coupon for B&N members.

I missed this the last time it happened, and now they start it up again just after the nearest B&N to me phased out its music and video section. ::pinch::

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Combine with this coupon (expires the 15th, must be used in-store) and, if you've a B&N membership for 10% off, one could walk away with, say, Ingmar Bergman: Four Masterworks or Eric Rohmer's Six Moral Tales for about $34 + tax. Or Wings of Desire, Diary of a Country Priest, Days of Heaven, The Last Days of Disco, or Double Life Of Veronique for $13.50 . Or 10 Years Of Rialto Pictures for $50 & change. Etc., etc., etc....

Here's the coupon for B&N members.

I missed this the last time it happened, and now they start it up again just after the nearest B&N to me phased out its music and video section. ::pinch::

If it's too far to the next closest store, current 15% and 10% off online codes are listed here (for B&N members only, though).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to du Garbandier's coupon, I just got 50% off -- and then 25% off of that -- on both Solaris, and ... THIS!

EAHvol1_try5.jpg

I am a very, very happy boy.

Edited by Overstreet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Persona   

Thanks a lot, Jeffrey. Now I am both broke and jealous...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's mine is yours, Stef. Come out to Seattle sometime, and watch to your heart's content. I remember that you have a few things in *your* collection that caused me to stumble sigh in admiration.

Edited by Overstreet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing about these multi-movie sets is that they're often bare-bones -- they don't include any of the bonus features that come with the stand-alone editions of the same movies. And while that might not be a big deal with a typical DVD's bonus features, Criterion bonus features are usually something else. So, buyer beware.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, and yet... I don't know about you, but I can get the deluxe versions of any of these from my local library and watch the extras.

I rarely watch extras or listen to commentaries on a film more than once. Extras are nice, but what I value most about Criterion editions are their meticulously cleaned-up versions of the film itself. If I can add six Criterion features to my collection for the price of buying one of their features-with-extras, I'll take it.

Edited by Overstreet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent about 45 minutes last night paging through the entire Criterion catalog at BN.com. I'm not sure it's every single Criterion title that's still in print, but I think it was 300-plus, maybe just shy of 400 titles.

I'm happy to report that, although I loved looking over the list of amazing films, I've finally hit a point in my life where I no longer feel like I have to own these movies. It's great to know they're out there, and that I can track them down when/if needed, but not once in reviewing the titles did I think, "Oh, man, I'm ordering that one ASAP!"

Part of the reason I reviewed the selection is that my wife is returning today from a visit with her parents, and I've been promised that they're sending along a belated birthday gift for me. In the past, they've been known to give Barnes & Noble gift cards. But if I receive one, I'll put it toward a book or CD on my list.

Unless I change my mind. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overstreet wrote:

: True, and yet... I don't know about you, but I can get the deluxe versions of any of these from my local library and watch the extras.

Assuming the set in question is actually available at the library (surely their Criterion collection isn't all THAT complete), and assuming there isn't a long list of people with holds on the item in question, and assuming the disc hasn't been scratched to the point of unusability (one of the few areas where DVDs are actually kind of inferior to VHS; I don't recall ever having these sorts of problems with the VHS tapes that I borrowed from the library or rented from the video store).

And the "extras" on Criterion discs, in particular, often include archival materials -- such as short films that are unavailable anywhere else -- that go beyond the making-of stuff that we find on typical DVDs. If I were going to buy any of these films at all, I'd like to get the versions that come with some of these affiliated materials. But that's just me, of course.

: I rarely watch extras or listen to commentaries on a film more than once.

And you call yourself a film scholar. ;)

Seriously, I'm glad I have the loaded-up versions of The Last Temptation of Christ (a Criterion disc), The Day the Earth Stood Still (not a Criterion disc, but oh well) and other films, because I have found it very useful in my writing.

: If I can add six Criterion features to my collection for the price of buying one of their features-with-extras, I'll take it.

And that's a fair choice. I just think people need to be aware of the choices they have, instead of walking into one of those choices blindly. Hence I say, "Buyer beware."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overstreet wrote:

: True, and yet... I don't know about you, but I can get the deluxe versions of any of these from my local library and watch the extras.

Assuming the set in question is actually available at the library (surely their Criterion collection isn't all THAT complete), and assuming there isn't a long list of people with holds on the item in question, and assuming the disc hasn't been scratched to the point of unusability (one of the few areas where DVDs are actually kind of inferior to VHS; I don't recall ever having these sorts of problems with the VHS tapes that I borrowed from the library or rented from the video store).

I'm lucky, actually. Our library is very well networked, and when it comes to old films I can usually get them within two weeks. I've never run into a copy that didn't play, although if I did I'm sure they'd replace it. But then, I hear from locals all the time that our library system is pretty extraordinary. It took less than a week for my request for Criterion's new Bicycle Thieves to come in, and it was in pristine condition -- both discs, and the sizable booklet included.

And you call yourself a film scholar. ;)

If I ever call myself that, folks will have good reason to ridicule me. :unsure: I've never taken a single class on film, and the gaps in what I've seen are vast. (I'm glad I finally caught up with Bicycle Thieves.) I might call myself an enthusiast, and maybe even an interpreter. But that goes for everybody else here too.

Edited by Overstreet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing about these multi-movie sets is that they're often bare-bones -- they don't include any of the bonus features that come with the stand-alone editions of the same movies. And while that might not be a big deal with a typical DVD's bonus features, Criterion bonus features are usually something else. So, buyer beware.

A salutary warning. The Essential Art House sets, however, are a little different in that the stand-alone editions are also scaled down. See the individual Rashomon edition, for instance: movie-only and retailing at $20. And since these discs are packaged very differently than the usual Criterions (Criteria?), I would think that the typical buyer stands in relatively slight danger of mistaking them for the full versions. If anything, some perfunctory research would show that a set of six or seven fully loaded Criterion dvds would be vastly more expensive than the current EAH set prices. A number of Criterion 3 and 4 disc sets run at $80-100.

That said, Criterion or the retailers, or both, could perhaps stand to find some way to better clarify the distinctions between editions. Look at their Grand Illusion page. Both editions are listed on the side with their respective prices, but the page's disc information is for the fully-loaded version only. Unless I'm missing something, the EAH edition seems not to have its own separate page. So potentially confusing.

Edited by du Garbandier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overstreet wrote:

: I've never run into a copy that didn't play, although if I did I'm sure they'd replace it.

Assuming the edition you're looking for is still in print, of course.

How a library or video store handles the first three Wallace & Gromit short films might be a good test case, here. There were four editions of those three films, and each one came with different bonus features -- and not just frilly making-of documentaries, but even-shorter films that star the same characters, etc. (What's more, I believe only the very-first edition has the original soundtrack to The Wrong Trousers; the other editions all have soundtracks that were revised for copyright reasons.) The thing is, by the time each new edition came out, the previous edition had gone out of print -- so there'd be no way to replace it, unless the outlet in question made a point of looking for rare or used discs.

I say all this as one who ordered the first edition of W&G from Videomatica.ca, because that was the cover art (front and back) that they had on their website, and was dismayed to find that they sent me the third edition instead. I e-mailed them a complaint, and they said they'd replace the cover art on their website, but so far ... nope.

: I've never taken a single class on film . . .

But you write textbooks! ;)

du Garbandier, thanks for the tip; I didn't realize that Criterion was releasing cheaper, bare-bones stand-alone versions of its various films.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went to B&N the other day and bought the Late Ozu Eclipse set for 35 bucks! I'm very much looking forward to these films. I've only seen Tokyo Twilight and Early Spring from the bunch, but both were wonderful, especially the former.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TBeane, those Ozus are the only titles that gave me serious pause as I browsed through the catalog listings. I have very fond memories of seeing my first Ozu film on Bravo while at college 20 years ago. It was Floating Weeds, which is available from Criterion with a slightly different title. Several years ago, I caught another Ozu film at the Virginia Film Festival and it was marvelous. Trouble is, I can't remember the title -- was it Early Spring? Late Spring? Early Summer? Late Autumn? Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ... and Spring? Wait a minute: That last one isn't Ozu. :)

My Ozu viewing beyond those two films extends only to Tokyo Story, so I'm woefully underrepresented in my exposure to the man many consider the world's greatest filmmaker. My film professor had a license plate that read "Ozu" -- maybe he still has it -- but he never showed us any Ozu films.

Edited by Christian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
KShaw   

I bought Kicking and Screaming, Solaris, and The Double Life of Veronique as gifts.

For myself, The Flowers of St. Francis. (I've never seen it before, though, so I don't know whether I'll want to rewatch it.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyler   

TBeane, those Ozus are the only titles that gave me serious pause as I browsed through the catalog listings. I have very fond memories of seeing my first Ozu film on Bravo while at college 20 years ago. It was Floating Weeds, which is available from Criterion with a slightly different title. Several years ago, I caught another Ozu film at the Virginia Film Festival and it was marvelous. Trouble is, I can't remember the title -- was it Early Spring? Late Spring? Early Summer? Late Autumn? Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ... and Spring? Wait a minute: That last one isn't Ozu. :)

My Ozu viewing beyond those two films extends only to Tokyo Story, so I'm woefully underrepresented in my exposure to the man many consider the world's greatest filmmaker. My film professor had a license plate that read "Ozu" -- maybe he still has it -- but he never showed us any Ozu films.

The other one on the Ozu disk is A Story of Floating Weeds. "In 1959, Yasujiro Ozu remade his 1934 silent classic A Story of Floating Weeds in color with the celebrated cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa (Rashomon, Ugetsu)."

I got the set for Christmas last year, but I've still only watched the silent movie. I really should get around to that sometime, and to watching Tokyo Story again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm happy to report that, although I loved looking over the list of amazing films, I've finally hit a point in my life where I no longer feel like I have to own these movies. It's great to know they're out there, and that I can track them down when/if needed, but not once in reviewing the titles did I think, "Oh, man, I'm ordering that one ASAP!"
I am sooo with you. I paged thru the first few pages of the "Newest releases", and I honestly don't know what I could add to my collection that I already have, and not desiring to double-dip on.

It would help if the Criterion label gave us any indication as to whether a title is going out of print or not. A few years ago, I snagged Hitchcock's _Notorious_ and _Rebecca_, and I'm glad I did: apparently these well-received titles (#1 on EW's top DVD list that year) are no longer in print. Another title not in print, the cult-fave "This Is Spinal Tap", with another commentary track separate from what I have at home. And yet I still see titles that have been there forever.

If it helps others, the last few titles I got, (from last year's sale) include "The Red Balloon" and "Arabian Knights" (for the young 'uns), "Ace in the Hole" and "Eyes Without a Face" for me.

Our DVD collection is pretty much maxed out, almost. I will be getting UP and the "It's Garry Schandling's Show", but that's pretty much it.

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TBeane, those Ozus are the only titles that gave me serious pause as I browsed through the catalog listings. I have very fond memories of seeing my first Ozu film on Bravo while at college 20 years ago. It was Floating Weeds, which is available from Criterion with a slightly different title. Several years ago, I caught another Ozu film at the Virginia Film Festival and it was marvelous. Trouble is, I can't remember the title -- was it Early Spring? Late Spring? Early Summer? Late Autumn? Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ... and Spring? Wait a minute: That last one isn't Ozu. :)

My Ozu viewing beyond those two films extends only to Tokyo Story, so I'm woefully underrepresented in my exposure to the man many consider the world's greatest filmmaker. My film professor had a license plate that read "Ozu" -- maybe he still has it -- but he never showed us any Ozu films.

What film classes did you take from that professor? Did you ever ask why he didn't show you any Ozu?

I haven't seen too many Ozu either, to be honest, but I have yet to see an Ozu that has been in any way disappointing. Early Summer is probably my favorite of his that I've seen, though I couldn't tell you exactly why that is (I've only seen it once and that was a few years ago). There's this really great forward camera movement down an empty hallway that I remember late in the film that makes it for me. That may sound silly, but, it really is an emotional thing to witness. It is by far the most active the camera is all film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×