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Disney Buys Marvel Entertainment


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Okay...this statement intrigues me:

John Lassiter met with key Marvel executives recently to talk about the potential of combining Marvel with Pixar. Everyone was very enthusiastic.

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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The geek in me is intrigued: I'd be interested to see what Pixar, with both their technical excellence and focus on storyline and character, could do with some of Marvel's titles.

Edited by opus

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
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Dang! I wanted to see a Pixar version of SUPERMAN...

In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."
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The geek in me is intrigued: I'd be interested to see what Pixar, with both their technical excellence and focus on storyline and character, could do with some of Marvel's titles.

Considering they made a better Fantastic Four Film than either live action film...

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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What do you do when you have a "Beast Redundancy"?

Edited by opus

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
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  • 2 weeks later...

Marvel films tend to be PG-13 (if not R, a la the Blade and Punisher movies). Pixar films are required to be G or PG (hence Andrew Stanton's John Carter of Mars will be a Disney or Touchstone film, NOT a Pixar film). The only PG film that Marvel has made, as far as I can recall, is ... the second Fantastic Four movie. And everyone agrees that Pixar has already bettered that franchise with The Incredibles.

So, I'd take these Marvel-Pixar cross-over stories with a grain of salt.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
Opus, Twitter, Facebook

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Marvel films tend to be PG-13 (if not R, a la the Blade and Punisher movies). Pixar films are required to be G or PG (hence Andrew Stanton's John Carter of Mars will be a Disney or Touchstone film, NOT a Pixar film). The only PG film that Marvel has made, as far as I can recall, is ... the second Fantastic Four movie. And everyone agrees that Pixar has already bettered that franchise with The Incredibles.

So, I'd take these Marvel-Pixar cross-over stories with a grain of salt.

Marvel super-hero movies tend to be PG-13. Marvel has a lot more to choose from, and plenty of kid friendly material that could be mined. Marvel is not exclusively super-heroes. It is what they are most famous for. Pixar and Marvel guys have been talking. That is a pretty wide open field.

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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Disney Faces Rights Issues Over Marvel

Heirs to the comic book artist Jack Kirby, a creator of characters and stories behind Marvel mainstays like

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 6 months later...

A Supersized Custody Battle Over Marvel Superheroes

Last September in a prelude to a lawsuit, Mr. Toberoff — using a provision in copyright law that, under certain conditions, gives authors or their heirs the right to regain ownership of a product after a given number of years — sent 45 notices of copyright termination to Marvel, Disney and other studios. The notices expressed the family’s intent to regain copyrights to some of Mr. Kirby’s creations as early as 2014. By Mr. Toberoff’s calculation, as much as 88 percent of Marvel’s film earnings have been what he calls “Kirby related.”

Marvel and Mr. Toberoff entered settlement talks. But on Jan. 8, Marvel surprised the Kirbys with a lawsuit seeking to invalidate the notices — stunning Mr. Toberoff, who figured Disney, having just written a huge check for Marvel, would settle. His foes thought otherwise.

“We took the initiative because we have a very strong legal position,” said James W. Quinn, a Marvel lawyer. “There is no question that Kirby was a great artist. But that’s not the law.”

The family has since filed a lawsuit against Marvel and Disney. Aside from seeking dismissal of Marvel’s lawsuit, Mr. Kirby’s children accuse the company of depriving the Kirby estate of credit — and thus profits — from movies like “X-Men Origins: Wolverine,” which took in $373 million at the global box office. Mr. Quinn dismissed this claim as frivolous. . . .

The dispute is also emblematic of a much larger conflict between intellectual property lawyers and media companies that, in Mr. Toberoff’s view, have made themselves vulnerable by building franchises atop old creations. So-called branded entertainment — anything based on superheroes, comic strips, TV cartoons or classic toys — may be easier to sell to audiences, but the intellectual property may also ultimately belong in full or in part to others.

“Any young lawyer starting out today could turn what he’s doing into a real profit center,” Paul Goldstein, who teaches intellectual-property law at Stanford’s law school, said of Mr. Toberoff’s specialty.

Mr. Goldstein said cases like the one involving Marvel are only the tip of an iceberg. A new wave of copyright termination actions is expected to affect the film, music and book industries as more works reach the 56-year threshold for ending older copyrights, or a shorter period for those created under a law that took effect in 1978.

Mr. Toberoff is tackling what could be one of the most significant rights cases in Hollywood history; it’s certainly the biggest involving a superhero franchise. Unlike his continuing fight with Warner Brothers over Superman, Mr. Toberoff’s rights-reclamation effort against Marvel involves dozens of stories and characters from about 240 comic books. . . .

IN many ways, the Marvel case is simple. It turns on whether Mr. Kirby was working as a hired hand or whether he was producing material on his own that he then sold to publishers. The Copyright Revision Act of 1976, which opened the door to termination attempts, bans termination for people who delivered work at the “instance and expense” of an employer.

Mr. Toberoff and Marvel disagree on the circumstances under which Mr. Kirby created or co-created the trove of characters. . . .

If [stan] Lee is called to testify about Mr. Kirby, his testimony could be complicated by an expanded business relationship with Disney. On Dec. 31, Disney announced that it had paid $2.5 million to increase an already existing stake in POW Entertainment (for Purveyors of Wonder), a company in which Mr. Lee is now a principal and the chief creative officer. POW develops new characters and stories for use in comic books, films, digital media and elsewhere. At the time, Disney said the investment was meant to obtain Mr. Lee’s help in mining the Marvel library. . . .

New York Times, March 19

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 year later...

Jack Kirby Estate Vows to Appeal Loss in Marvel Copyright Lawsuit

As we've reported, the Kirby estate is attempting to terminate early copyright grants of more than 45 lucrative characters, including such Marvel cash-cows as Thor and the Incrideble Hulk. The estate in September sent notices of termination to Marvel and its licensees Sony (Spider-Man), Fox (X-Men), Universal and others.

Marvel then hit back with a lawsuit in New York federal court that claims Kirby's creations were "works for hire" and thus not subject to termination. The two sides then filed summary judgment motions, and in a ruling released on Wednesday, the court sides with Marvel. . . .

Hollywood Reporter, July 28

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 years later...

The next step in "Marvel takes over the universe" includes a 4-series (and another miniseries) deal with Netflix.

 

 

Beginning in 2015, Netflix will start launching four live-action series over multiple years: "Daredevil" (blind lawyer who uses his extraordinary senses to fight crime), "Jessica Jones" (superhuman who couldn't cut it as a hero works as a PI), "Luke Cage" (ex-con with indestructible skin) and "Iron Fist" (wealthy martial artist with the ability to make his fist like unto a thing of iron). Netflix has committed to at least 13 episodes of each, followed by a miniseries about The Defenders, a Marvel title that has had many incarnations — most frequently involving the Hulk, Dr. Strange, Namor and the Silver Surfer — but essentially functions as a banner under which any collection of loner heroes (including Cage, Iron Fist and Daredevil at various points in its history) coming together to handle problems they can't deal with alone. The press release describes this version of The Defenders as "a dream team of self-sacrificing, heroic characters."

Essentially, it sounds like Marvel is trying to do a TV version of what it did in the movies with "Avengers": introduce the players one by one in solo vehicles, with each project laying the groundwork for the next one, until they all come together as a team. These are four characters with shared history in the comics — at present, Cage and Jones are married and have a kid (and I live in hope that the nanny, Squirrel Girl, will somehow find her way into one of these shows) — and who have powers that should be cheap and easy to portray on television: super strength for Cage and Jones, Daredevil's radar sense and Iron Fist's iron fist.
Read more at http://www.hitfix.com/whats-alan-watching/marvel-netflix-to-team-up-on-daredevil-luke-cage-jessica-jones-iron-fist-and-defenders-series#8kOL8lAi32uFf5HY.99

 

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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