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SDG

Things kids say

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The other day my wife took our 6-year-old son on a shopping trip to buy a present for my sister's baby shower. My sister isn't due for another couple months, so my wife told our son that we didn't know what the baby wanted because he was still inside his mommy -- to which our son responded, "He wants OUT!"

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opus   

Ian talking to his baby sister: "I'm your baby sister! I love you, son!"

And then there's this exchange between Renae and Simon:

Renae: Simon, I love how your brain works.

Simon: Yep, my brain works pretty well!

Renae: It sure does.

Simon: My brain also helps me go really fast.

As a former editor, Renae was quite pleased that he used "well" instead of "good".

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Audrey, pointing at my MacBook Pro: "Your computer has an apple on it. It's an apple."

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Audrey trying watermelon for the first time: "It's tastes like a balloon."

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opus   

A few nights ago, while putting Ian to sleep:

Ian: "What's that for?" (Pointing to my wedding ring.)

Me: "That's my wedding ring. I wear it to remind me how much I love Mommy and to show others that I love Mommy."

Ian: "Oh…"

Me: "Someday, when you marry a pretty lady, you'll wear a wedding ring, too."

Ian: "Yeah, when I marry Mommy."

Me: "You can't marry Mommy because I'm already married to her. You'll need to marry another pretty lady."

Ian: "Like Rowan's mommy." (Rowan is one of his buddies at church.)

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opus   

Simon: "Did you know that dirt is God's poop?"

huh.png

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opus   

Methinks my son might have a future in writing praise and worship choruses.

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SDG   

Recently I introduced my children to their first episode of "Pinky & the Brain" in an "Animaniacs" episode. I can't recap four-year-old Catie's subsequent musings verbatim, but she was much struck by the theological implications of Pinky and the Brain's plans to take over the world. Because the world is ruled by God. Not Pinky and the Brain.

This apparent tension caused her to briefly entertain the notion of God not being in "Pinky & the Brain." Then she decided that even though they don't see Him, He is there, because He's "in every world."

Throughout all this I made no comment at all. I just sat listening to her work it out.

On another note, during a recent family rosary, after the opening prayers for faith, hope and charity, I asked the younger kids a pop quiz question: What are faith, hope and charity? (These are known as the theological virtues.) Nine-year-old Anna, trying to recall my Sunday catechism classes at church, asked, "The … geological virtues?"

Edited by SDG

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You all are so spiritual. :P

Overheard at the dinner table recently:

Eric (4): I am cuter than Dominic.

Me: (3X): You guys are both cute!

Eric: Well, Dominic is like 100 cute. But I am infinity cute.

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SDG   

Last night after Christmas Eve Mass, we were doing our evening family devotions for Advent, and I was reciting the nativity stories from Matthew and Luke. (I memorized them years ago so that I could recite them without looking down at the Bible, to maintain eye contact with the kids.)

"But as he considered this, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, saying…"

Interrupting me, 4yo Catie interjected, "He thought it was a dream. But it was real."

"Well," I said, "it was really an angel, but it was a dream too. We have dreams about things that aren't real. But Joseph had a dream with a real angel in it."

Parsing this in the sci-fi / superhero vocabulary available to her, Catie assimilated this: "Angels can phase into dreams."

* * *

This morning, Catie's Disney Princess Magic Learning Computer asked her, "Have you always dreamed of being a princess?!"

"No," she answered matter-of-factly. "Course not."

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SDG wrote:

: Parsing this in the sci-fi / superhero vocabulary available to her, Catie assimilated this: "Angels can phase into dreams."

That's awesome.

She's only four, you say? Sigh.

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SDG   
That's awesome.

She's only four, you say? Sigh.

Well, Catie does take after her big sister Sarah in pretty crazy language skills…but in Sarah's case, at least, that's part of a package deal that also includes Asperger spectrum symptoms and sometimes-debilitating OCD, among other things. Some of the others have OCD leanings as well. Remains to be seen how it will all work out in Catie's case.

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Hey, my four-year-old's autistic too, but he got one of the more inarticulate forms of autism. (It was only a few weeks ago that he started to say "okay". And one of the reasons his interventionists encourage him to use that word is because saying "yes" is too difficult for him.) Not that I'm comparing or anything, sigh.

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Russ   

Just a few hours ago:

My wife Ali: "Is daddy going to help you put together your Sponge Bob legos?"

Our 2 3/4 year-old Daisy: "Yes...daddy...loves...legos."

Daisy's got a working diagnosis of childhood apraxia of speech, so a spontaneous and uncoached multi-word phrase is, like, the best thing ever.

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M. Leary   

Darren, after 10 pages, I think this one wins... Read it yesterday and am still laughing at the image.

This thread is bittersweet for me. I have a near three year old boy who has a speech issue we have struggled with for a long time now. He is very gross motor intelligent, very talkative, and very pastoral over other kids. But the poor kid just can't talk. His words are hard to understand. He tries to tell us jokes, tries to comfort his older sister when she is upset. I know his mind is a whirlwind of first experiences and brilliantly juvenile connections - we just can't hear them!

He is going into an intensive occupational therapy program next month. Maybe he can contribute to this thread in a year or so.

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Darren H   

Best of luck, M (and Russ, too). I can imagine how frustrating that must be. Our best friends' older daughter has a speech issue, too, and I try to remind myself of this whenever Rory's constant barrage of talking begins to get on my nerves. Joanna and I realized recently that the hardest part of parenting for us is that we're both deeply introverted, so having a hyper-verbal, ridiculously precocious kid just wears. us. out. Joanna and I have always said (only half-joking) that the secret of our marriage is a two-story house. That we created a cuddly, attention-starved social animal is a wonderful Cosmic joke!

Edited by Darren H

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SDG   
Best of luck, M (and Russ, too).

and Peter.

Joanna and I realized recently that the hardest part of parenting for us is that we're both deeply introverted, so having a hyper-verbal, ridiculously precocious kid just wears. us. out.

I'm not deeply introverted, but I'm somewhat introverted, and we have one hyperverbal kid—as in, never stops talking ever—who is our only confirmed extrovert in seven kids, who wears us out too. So I can definitely relate to that.

Edited by SDG

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SDG wrote:

: I'm not deeply introverted, but I'm somewhat introverted, and we have one hyperverbal kid—as in, never stops talking ever—who is our only confirmed extrovert in seven kids, who wears us out too. So I can definitely relate to that.

FWIW, on the Myers-Briggs scale, I'm apparently borderline extrovert/introvert, though I tilt extrovert. But as far as my children go... Well, it just so happens that my one non-autistic child, i.e. my daughter, never stops talking herself, and is always narrating her life (after she was toilet-trained, she'd go to the bathroom and we'd hear her voice come from behind the door, announcing "It's coming out!!"), and she has a habit of answering every single question even when it's very clear that the question was directed not at her but at one of her brothers. So we're always telling her to back off, shush, leave it alone, etc. Makes things a little crazy.

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Darren H   

I'm getting some work done while Rory "takes a nap" in her room next door. She's been completely alone in there for over an hour but hasn't stopped talking and singing for more than 10 seconds at a time. It's remarkable, really.

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Further proof that parents don't need to entertain their kids, be their best friend, etc.

And proof that nap time is a very good thing.

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