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Christian

Worst Films of the Decade

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And one day, when I have kids, I'll be more than tempted to show them the director's cut at age 12 and let that "drugs are bad" message sink in a little more viscerally than a school assembly might.

I think a lot of the rhythms, the over-reliance on techniques associated with commercial videography and the MTV schtick, and the repeated hallowing of the physical paraphernalia of drug abuse actually encourages drug abuse. It is a pro-addiction film at worst, a total celebration of heroin chic at best.

Are there any essays by yourself or others that explore this argument in detail? I'd love to delve deeper.

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I haven't had time to search through the entire thread, but has GI Joe: Rise of the 'Splosions been mentioned, yet?

I think it was just a given. Kinda like Trannies: Revenge of the Limpos.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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I haven't had time to search through the entire thread, but has GI Joe: Rise of the 'Splosions been mentioned, yet?

I think it was just a given. Kinda like Trannies: Revenge of the Limpos.

:lol:

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Now that I think of it, any film with:

Noun colon (abstract motion noun) "of the" (synonym of main noun that is the central bad idea for a movie)

can most probably qualify it for a "Worst Films of the Decade" thread.

Edited by Persona

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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And since it's almost Christmas, there are a number of holiday movies that could be on this list.

Surviving Christmas, Christmas with the Kranks, Deck the Halls, and Four Christmases all deserve to be nominated.

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And since it's almost Christmas, there are a number of holiday movies that could be on this list.

Surviving Christmas, Christmas with the Kranks, Deck the Halls, and Four Christmases all deserve to be nominated.

I could agree with the first three...but Four Christmases was merely mediocre. If we are going to use the term "worst", then mediocre movies should not be nominated.


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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And since it's almost Christmas, there are a number of holiday movies that could be on this list.

Surviving Christmas, Christmas with the Kranks, Deck the Halls, and Four Christmases all deserve to be nominated.

I could agree with the first three...but Four Christmases was merely mediocre. If we are going to use the term "worst", then mediocre movies should not be nominated.

All I can say, is that you are a much more forgiving person than I. By the end of the movie I wanted to throw my shoe at the screen. :)

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The Squid and the Whale is my pick for worst film of the decade according to the standards set here. I hate it with all my being. I hate it like I hate rapini. I hate it like I hate a fraud, which is really what this thing is. And I hate that many of you love it. You people are all screwed up for loving this stench-infested garbage. It is a horrible, horrid, awful film that on the one hand pretends it has something meaningful to say about kids of divorced parents being screwed up, and on the other hand has such farcical ideas as both the dad sleeping with he-and-his-son's roommate, and an almost-pubescent kid who wipes his semen all over public places and drinks beer and hard liquor and not a parent seems to care. Pick one or the other, not all three. I hate the characters, too. There are many reasons to hate this film, but the greatest reason to hate it is that so many of you seem to champion it as an apologetic against divorce -- and a comedic one at that. There's nothing funny in The Squid and the Whale. I loathe every character and every action. I loathe the writing and its cutsie pie "I can get away with this sick sh*t and pretend that is has a point." But there is no point. Oh gee, I guess that final "artsy" shot of the squid and the whale was supposed to make me think. Like I can't think for myself. What a load of crap. And again, gee, let's all talk about it in some pseudo-intellectual coffee house and pretend we're all in the in-crowd, an act that makes us happier when we sleep at night

UGH! :angry:

Edited by Persona

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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The Squid and the Whale is my pick for worst film of the decade according to the standards set here. I hate it with all my being. I hate it like I hate rapini.

You know, I didn't even finish watching "The Squid and the Whale" because the father character, although ably acted by Jeff Daniels, was such an abhorrent character that I found even his fictive presence too much for me to willingly take. And so, yes, in one sense I know what you mean here. But there is a huge difference between portraying negative characters and endorsing their behavior, and I didn't think the film was doing that, and so I can't join you in such a whole-hearted condemnation of the film.

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I didn't say it is endorsing his behavior. I said the whole film is a farce in that it pretends to offer a moral, and that all the religious critics and divorced kids ate it up like minced meat pie. Yeah, have fun swallowing all of that, because no matter how much you don't want to tell the person that made it -- it stinks.

Edited by Persona

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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I didn't say it is endorsing his behavior. I said the whole film is a farce in that it pretends to offer a moral, and that all the religious crtics and divorced kids ate it up like minced meat pie. Yeah, have fun swallowing all of that, because no matter how much you don't want to tell the person that made it -- it stinks.

I must say I am surprised to ever find myself defending "The Squid and the Whale", which was a movie that I couldn't even finish watching, but I didn't think that my reaction to it was a fault in the movie as an object per se, but rather just a bad relation between myself as a viewer and the movie as a thing viewed. The question of why anyone would enjoy a movie about characters who we would never associate with in real life is an interesting one, but not one that I have any answers for. Hannibal Lector, for example, is a far worse character by almost any measure than the father in TSATW, but I thought that through some strange alchemy that Lector was a compelling on-screen character, even though if he was a real person there would be few lengths I would be unwilling to endure to escape his presence.

With regard to TSATW and morality, I didn't think that the point of TSATW was to offer a moral, but to portray characters and their relationships, consciously disagreeable characters in consciously destructive relationships. From this wreckage, one could certainly draw a moral if one is so inclined, but even the parts I saw warranted a considerably more nuanced reception than "And the moral of tonight's story is..." and if you're seeing the movie as a long set-up for such a moral summation, I can see where you would find fault with it. I don't think, however, that such a line of criticism does the movie justice.

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I'll see your "Squid & the Whale", Stef, and raise you a fargging "Revolutionary Road".


"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

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I didn't say it is endorsing his behavior. I said the whole film is a farce in that it pretends to offer a moral, and that all the religious crtics and divorced kids ate it up like minced meat pie. Yeah, have fun swallowing all of that, because no matter how much you don't want to tell the person that made it -- it stinks.

I must say I am surprised to ever find myself defending "The Squid and the Whale", which was a movie that I couldn't even finish watching, but I didn't think that my reaction to it was a fault in the movie as an object per se, but rather just a bad relation between myself as a viewer and the movie as a thing viewed. The question of why anyone would enjoy a movie about characters who we would never associate with in real life is an interesting one, but not one that I have any answers for. Hannibal Lector, for example, is a far worse character by almost any measure than the father in TSATW, but I thought that through some strange alchemy that Lector was a compelling on-screen character, even though if he was a real person there would be few lengths I would be unwilling to endure to escape his presence.

With regard to TSATW and morality, I didn't think that the point of TSATW was to offer a moral, but to portray characters and their relationships, consciously disagreeable characters in consciously destructive relationships. From this wreckage, one could certainly draw a moral if one is so inclined, but even the parts I saw warranted a considerably more nuanced reception than "And the moral of tonight's story is..." and if you're seeing the movie as a long set-up for such a moral summation, I can see where you would find fault with it. I don't think, however, that such a line of criticism does the movie justice.

You are absolutely right about this. And that is how many, many people see the film. And that is the biggest fault I can find in it, is that there are people who like it for said moral, that they have been duped to believe in one when none exists.

I'll see your "Squid & the Whale", Stef, and raise you a fargging "Revolutionary Road".

How dare you. Revolutionary Road is brilliance personified. Plus, there is a small part by one character in RR that has less than ten minutes screen time, that is worth everything else one doesn't like about the rest of the story and film. This must. be. admitted to.

Edited by Persona

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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How dare you. Revolutionary Road is brilliance personified. Plus, there is a small part by one character in RR that has less than ten minutes screen time, that is worth everything else one doesn't like about the rest of the story and film. This must. be. admitted to.

I find some artistic similarities between Squid and Revolutionary Road, but Mendes' film is far more irksome to me. Yeah, I know. The American Dream is a rotting, maggot-ridden lie, American Beauty Redux, without the humor. Gotcha. More naked Kate Winslet, please.

"The things we enjoy are channels through which the divine glory strikes us, and those who love and delight in any good thing may yet learn to love God." --Gilbert Meilaender

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Babe: Pig in the City is a misunderstood near-masterpiece. ::box2::

I think we have a new contender for most misguided family film since Babe: Pig in the City. Which doesn't mean the new film isn't marvelous in some ways. It's just ... so ... weird.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Christian wrote:

: I think we have a new contender for most misguided family film since Babe: Pig in the City. Which doesn't mean the new film isn't marvelous in some ways. It's just ... so ... weird.

Assuming you're referring to the movie that I think you're referring to ... I can't help wondering if calling the film a "family film" might, itself, be a bit misguided. Is it actually INTENDED as such?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Christian wrote:

: I think we have a new contender for most misguided family film since Babe: Pig in the City. Which doesn't mean the new film isn't marvelous in some ways. It's just ... so ... weird.

Assuming you're referring to the movie that I think you're referring to ... I can't help wondering if calling the film a "family film" might, itself, be a bit misguided. Is it actually INTENDED as such?

I think that's an excellent question. It's an assumption on my part. Is it fair to say that the Babe sequel was promoted as a family film? In that case, there was an earlier film with an established audience. In this case, the team behind the film has a record of ... well, depends on what one means by "family entertainment," I suppose.

Also, FWIW, the crowd I saw it with was full of young kids. One of those Saturday-morning screenings that the PR company reserves for "family" films.

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Christian wrote:

: Is it fair to say that the Babe sequel was promoted as a family film? In that case, there was an earlier film with an established audience.

Exactly.

: In this case, the team behind the film has a record of ... well, depends on what one means by "family entertainment," I suppose.

It's an interesting question, since (if you're referring to the film I think you're referring to), the PREVIOUS films made by this team were based on a Disney theme-park attraction ... but were also the first PG-13 films released under the Disney label.

: Also, FWIW, the crowd I saw it with was full of young kids. One of those Saturday-morning screenings that the PR company reserves for "family" films.

Yeah, same here. I just chalk that up to the assumption everyone makes that "animation" equals "family fare", except perhaps in extreme or obvious cases like the South Park or Beavis & Butthead movies.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Yeah, same here. I just chalk that up to the assumption everyone makes that "animation" equals "family fare", except perhaps in extreme or obvious cases like the South Park or Beavis & Butthead movies.

So the question comes down to whether the audience interested in seeing this film (at least at the preview screening) is interested in it because they just assume that it's for them, or in some part because the studio behind the film has actively marketed to that segment via certain TV shows, cable channels, etc. that capture the same audience. If I watched more shows like those, or had cable, I might be more confident of the answer.

FWIW, the film I'm referring to -- which I DARE NOT NAME until opening day!!! -- has several reviews of it posted on the Internet, and one of them ends with this:

But what animated children’s movie that you can think of has a character shout, “Go to Hell!” at a villainous snake? It doesn’t matter that the snake ... answers “Where you do think I came from?” Fitfully amusing or not, the whole demented enterprise ... comes into question when you’re that tone-deaf about what’s appropriate for children.

So that reviewer, at least, was working on the same assumption I was working on, although that doesn't make him correct.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I don't really get invited to previews (except if it's a Bible film and I beg) so I can just say it. And given how frustrating these last few posts are for those who are not in the know I'm gonna.

They are talking about Rango.

Matt

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My kids loved Babe: Pig In the City. We got to bond over weeks of nightmares.

:lol:


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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