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The Sorcerer's Apprentice

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhKvNn7WLKg

May I see a version with *just* the Alfred Molina scenes please?

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Nick Cage is in a contest with himself for most trailers with the most booming bass sounds of the decade. I counted six in the first 34 seconds. This is always a very bad sign.

OOOH! Love the Depeche!!

I heard that one live. Freaking rocked.

Edited by Persona

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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I refrained from starting a thread for this trailer, but oh well, it has now been deemed A&F-worthy after all. :)

FWIW, link to my most recent blog post on the film, which dates back to May of this year. It links back to an even earlier post, which links back to an even earlier post, etc., etc. I'm mildly surprised that I never posted any of those news links to A&F, but oh well.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Not surprising....

The Hollywood Reporter

A tired relic of summer-movie cliches, clearly beaten to death by far too many credited writers -- and only a sorcerer would know how many "contributions" came from producers, the star and other hands -- "Apprentice" lurches from one been-there-done-that sequence to another.

Variety

The magic here feels machine-made and depressingly state-of-the-art; apart from the obligatory sequence paying homage to the symphonic poem made famous in "Fantasia" (complete with brooms, buckets and Paul Dukas' familiar music), its sole purpose is to deliver the sort of action-oriented pyrotechnic displays that will presumably dazzle an audience into submission.... the lack of imagination on offer is genuinely dispiriting.

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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I must say, this movie may have the most romantic scene involving Tesla coils ever filmed.

So how many Jerry Bruckheimer productions have touched on Arthurian legend, now? This... King Arthur... anything else?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I must say, this movie may have the most romantic scene involving Tesla coils ever filmed.

They've always played a big part in my fantasies. Oh, that's TMI, huh.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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I just realized that the gap in time between Nicolas Cage's Oscar-winning performance in Leaving Las Vegas (1995) and today is almost DOUBLE the gap in time between Leaving Las Vegas and Raising Arizona (1987).

Gad, I feel old.

But anyway. Cage's Oscar win was, paradoxically, sort of the beginning of the end, for him, as a serious-but-offbeat actor. Within months of his Oscar win, he starred in his first Jerry Bruckheimer production (1996's The Rock), and after that it became all about the big paycheques, seemingly.

Oh, and Darrel, thanks for the laugh. Your secret's safe with me, at least. ;)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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But anyway. Cage's Oscar win was, paradoxically, sort of the beginning of the end, for him, as a serious-but-offbeat actor. Within months of his Oscar win, he starred in his first Jerry Bruckheimer production (1996's The Rock), and after that it became all about the big paycheques, seemingly.

That seems a bit harsh. He did some lesser box office target films like Capt. Corelli's Violin, Lord of War, The Weatherman, Windtalkers and Matchstick Men. I'm not suggesting those are of the quality of the films you mentioned, but I think he sometimes does things that try to be more than just paycheck films.

Oh, and Darrel, thanks for the laugh. Your secret's safe with me, at least. ;)

Glad to help.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Darrel Manson wrote:

: That seems a bit harsh.

Fair enough; I've certainly enjoyed his work in films like Adaptation. And to be sure, Cage seems to be something of a workaholic who is happy to appear in a wide range of movies. But, I dunno, whether high-budget or low-, he sure does seem to star in a lot of dreck.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I have to say I'm mystified at the hate this one is getting. So far the only people I know who liked were me, my dad and, um, Prairie Miller. (Oh, hey, there's another one: Matt Pais.)

But I DID like it. Not only is Molina a lot of fun in his juiciest role since Doctor Octopus, I liked the writing. Yes, even with all 57 (or whatever) credited screenwriters. The dialogue has a goofy sense of humor and wit, like Molina's complaint to Baruchel after emerging from a decade-long stint of captivity inside a mystic artifact where he had exactly one thing to read for a decade. Like Molina's sidekick's wisecrack when they're trying to get information about Baruchel from a college administrator, which is now my favorite Star Wars allusion in another movie.

I like that Baruchel's character is a nerd who actually has an interest, instead of a Potteresque blank slate. And that the girl has a completely different interest. And that he's able to take an interest in her interest while impressing her with his interest -- twice.

I like the stunt with the Magic Marker and the school bus window that he does in the third grade field trip, and the note that he passes the pretty classmate, which is probably better than two-thirds of all pick-up lines even in the movies.

And yes, Peter, that's a great scene with the Tesla coils. It's just so offbeat, so not what you expect in a popcorn blockbuster. I was charmed and entertained.

Looks like my fresh review may be pretty lonely out there on the Tomatometer. :)


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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SDG wrote:

: Not only is Molina a lot of fun in his juiciest role since Doctor Octopus . . .

Hmmm, one of the first things I said to my wife after the screening (and she liked the film too, FWIW) was that I wished Molina had had more to do. I think I might prefer his performance in Prince of Persia, for two inter-related reasons: one, he wasn't the villain in that one, so he was more of a loose cannon and less restricted by the demands of the plot, and two, this meant he got to effortlessly steal every scene he was in. Molina does have some delightful bits in The Sorcerer's Apprentice -- the bit about the reading material was definitely a hoot -- but, I dunno, I felt he was a little more constrained here. (Maybe I'm just reacting to the difference in his costume, here.)

: I like that Baruchel's character is a nerd who actually has an interest, instead of a Potteresque blank slate. And that the girl has a completely different interest. And that he's able to take an interest in her interest while impressing her with his interest -- twice.

This is very nicely put. And you're right, this is definitely one of the script's stronger points.

Jumping to another tangent: Between this and Star Trek: First Contact, we now have at least two films in which Alice Krige plays a villain who disintegrates in the end. Are there any other films like this in her repertoire?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Peter, you say Mrs. C liked it? Does that imply that you didn't? Or aren't you saying?

: Not only is Molina a lot of fun in his juiciest role since Doctor Octopus . . .

Hmmm, one of the first things I said to my wife after the screening (and she liked the film too, FWIW) was that I wished Molina had had more to do. I think I might prefer his performance in Prince of Persia, for two inter-related reasons: one, he wasn't the villain in that one, so he was more of a loose cannon and less restricted by the demands of the plot, and two, this meant he got to effortlessly steal every scene he was in. Molina does have some delightful bits in The Sorcerer's Apprentice -- the bit about the reading material was definitely a hoot -- but, I dunno, I felt he was a little more constrained here. (Maybe I'm just reacting to the difference in his costume, here.)

Heh. I won't contest that minute for minute Molina might have been more entertaining in Prince of Persia. But I think I can still claim this as the juicier role, even if the individual bites are less juicy, just because there are so many more bites. :)

With Prince of Persia, as good as Molina was, I felt frustrated by the smallness of his role and the wasteland of non-entertainment he was stranded it. I even found myself wondering if I was making more of his performance than it deserved just because it was the only thing worth watching. Watching this movie, I almost feel like I'm getting the deferred enjoyment of his Prince of Persia performance now. :D

Jumping to another tangent: Between this and Star Trek: First Contact, we now have at least two films in which Alice Krige plays a villain who disintegrates in the end. Are there any other films like this in her repertoire?

Wow. A vintage Chattaway observation. Wonderful!

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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SDG wrote:

: Peter, you say Mrs. C liked it? Does that imply that you didn't? Or aren't you saying?

What I told her on the ride home was that I reacted to this film much the same way I often do to romantic comedies: The opening scenes, in which all the characters are introduced, are fairly loose and so they're kind of fun and amusing, too; but as the movie moves along, and especially as it moves into its third act, the formulae imposed by the genre take over and a lot of the fun goes out of the movie for me. In romantic comedies, you always get a break-up followed by a reunion in the last 15-20 minutes, and of course these things are always handled rather earnestly and seriously compared to the rest of the movie; similarly, in a centuries-spanning duel of the fates such as this movie imagines, the last 15-20 minutes are necessarily filled with special effects and a lot of sound and fury. So, to make a long answer short, I liked the early scenes better than the later scenes, and I liked them because they brought a certain humour to the film.

: With Prince of Persia, as good as Molina was, I felt frustrated by . . . the wasteland of non-entertainment he was stranded [in].

Ha!

(Incidentally, one of the reasons I love When Harry Met Sally... so much is because, unlike so many other romantic comedies, it manages to make even the break-up and the reunion funny, and in a way that is still quite heartfelt and still feels utterly true to the characters.)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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FWIW, my wife liked the movie too. (I'm not saying about me yet.)


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Now that my review is up, I say I enjoyed it, but mildly so. SDG is right that there is some nice writing at various points. And the revisioning of original Sorcerer's Apprentice was very good. But I also found it a bit disappointing. If I'd wanted to be snarky I'd have said something about it being one of the few action films lately that wasn't made in 3D (not that I'm a fan of 3D) but then it really couldn't have been made in 3D since there was no depth in the story to start with.

Certainly there is a good deal of room here for examination of what it is to be a messiah when you really don't want to be or about the interaction of magic and science and art. There are a few little hints at those things along the way, but I kept thinking that those explorations were cut away through the various rewrites.

Enjoyable, yes. Worthwhile, meh.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Brutal. Not only did this film open behind Inception, which everyone expected, but it's also well behind the second week of Despicable Me. One wonders what this might spell for the future of Jerry Bruckheimer and his relationship with Disney.

If memory serves, this movie was greenlit by the same Disney administration that got the boot last year. Earlier this year, it looked like that gang might have been vindicated by Alice in Wonderland, but now...? Well, Bruckheimer IS producing the fourth Pirates of the Caribbean for Disney, and THAT film will star Alice's Johnny Depp, so I guess Bruckheimer can hang tight for now. But after this, Prince of Persia, G-Force and Confessions of a Shopaholic, Bruckheimer seems to have lost some of his big-screen mojo (at least in North America; Prince of Persia did decent business overseas, but not enough, I think, to warrant a sequel).


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Mrs. CrimsonLine and I saw this film this weekend on Bluray. She didn't like it very much (finding the main character's voice too grating) but I liked it decently well. It's not an amazing film, but it's funny, sweet, and romantic. I don't know. I wasn't expecting much, but I was pleasantly surprised.


In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."

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Mrs. CrimsonLine and I saw this film this weekend on Bluray. She didn't like it very much (finding the main character's voice too grating) but I liked it decently well. It's not an amazing film, but it's funny, sweet, and romantic. I don't know. I wasn't expecting much, but I was pleasantly surprised.

I showed it to my family when it came out on Blu-ray/DVD. Everyone enjoyed it.

I see I never linked to my review.

The first good thing about The Sorcerer’s Apprentice is that it isn’t called The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Oath of the Dragon Ring or The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Nesting Dolls of Doom. Producer Jerry Bruckheimer’s penchant for turning unlikely source material into high-concept supernatural action-comedy-romance popcorn movies with unwieldy, franchise-friendly two-part titles is well established. Already he’s done theme park rides (Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl) and more recently video games (Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time). Now he’s given us what is surely the first-ever supernatural action-comedy-romance popcorn movie based on a classic Mickey Mouse cartoon. I’m trying to think what even unlikelier source material he might turn to next.

If it doesn’t rise to the level of the first Pirates of the Caribbean — for several reasons, among them that there’s no recapturing the bottled lightning of Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow — The Sorcerer’s Apprentice gets right almost everything that Prince of Persia got wrong. It’s nonsense, but it’s entertaining nonsense, just like Prince of Persia wasn’t. The stars are charismatic and likable, and the romantic leads have real chemistry. The special effects are visually splendid. Alfred Molina, the best thing in both movies, gets to be the big bad guy instead of a minor supporting character.

The screenplay, much abused for its multiple writers, is peppered with laugh-out-loud humor and eccentric charm. I love the moment when the villain appears in the hero’s apartment after escaping a ten-year imprisonment during which his afflictions included sharply curtailed reading material. What it was, and his pitiless commentary on it, is a goofy ray of wit that’s not atypical of the movie’s sensibilities. A throwaway line in a scene in which the villain and a sidekick try to get information about the hero from a college administrator contains what is now my all-time favorite allusion to Star Wars in another movie.

...

Dave first made an impression on Becky 10 years earlier on a third-grade field trip by drawing a cartoon on the school bus window in Sharpie so that if you looked out the window with the New York skyline in the background, you’d see an iconic scene from a classic special-effects movie (another nod to the movie’s roots). Later on that field trip, Dave slipped Becky a sly love note that was better than probably two-thirds of all pick-up lines, even in the movies. For third grade, he was quite the character.

...

Despite the one-step title, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice ends with a typically Bruckheimerian after-the-credits tag suggesting sequel potential. I like the movie, but I like it how it is. The world doesn’t need The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Past Merlin’s Circle or The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Dance Magic Dance. If it does well with audiences, that might be in part because, as derivative as it is — and despite an entertaining homage to the eponymous Fantasia sequence — The Sorcerer’s Apprentice isn’t really a franchise film based on something else. Audiences, I think, are ready for new material. That’s what Hollywood should be gearing up to deliver.

So, well. I'm glad it didn't do well enough to demand a sequel, but I think it deserved quite a bit better than it go. Certainly it should have done better than Prince of Persia.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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After watching the film, I went and looked up your review, connecting to it from IMDB. Yours and Ebert's. :)


In case you were wondering, my name is spelled "Denes House," but it's pronounced "Throatwobbler Mangrove."

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