Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Tyler

Movies Everyone Except You Loves

Recommended Posts

Braveheart.

Gladiator.

Etc.

Yep. Definitely. You're certainly not alone there. I'm trying to keep an open mind about Robin Hood, but the teaser-trailer has effectively flatlined my interest in it.

Edited by Overstreet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd like to point out that I win, in the sense of being most out of step with mankind at large.

Hey! Get me out of last place. I voted with NBooth for The Princess Bride, that should put us in 13th place. (It's better than last)

I find The Wizard of Oz extremely grating. First and foremost because of the performances, which are all completely bizarre. It starts, I think, with Judy Garland, who at 17 is playing a character who was about 8 in the original story. Consequently, there is no way she can make her part believable (or even recognizable as a human being) and doesn't even try. Everyone else, having actual fantasy characters to play, feels they have to go beyond her, and the result is a veritable competition in wild, over-the-top, inauthentic, camp "acting". The genre of music is also utterly without appeal to me. Finally, it concludes with the painful it-was-all-a-dream ending (which was not in the book). I know the rest of mankind loves the movie, but I have never for a moment understood why.

Did you see this and make this decision when you were, like, six, or have you had a deprived childhood?

Edited by Persona

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find The Wizard of Oz extremely grating. First and foremost because of the performances, which are all completely bizarre. It starts, I think, with Judy Garland, who at 17 is playing a character who was about 8 in the original story. Consequently, there is no way she can make her part believable (or even recognizable as a human being) and doesn't even try. Everyone else, having actual fantasy characters to play, feels they have to go beyond her, and the result is a veritable competition in wild, over-the-top, inauthentic, camp "acting". The genre of music is also utterly without appeal to me. Finally, it concludes with the painful it-was-all-a-dream ending (which was not in the book). I know the rest of mankind loves the movie, but I have never for a moment understood why.

Sure. But it has flying monkeys. This alone vindicates the greatness of the movie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm trying to keep an open mind about Robin Hood, but the teaser-trailer has effectively flatlined my interest in it.

What's so terrible about the trailer is ... the title. It looks like a trailer for anything but Robin Hood. Every shot seems to proclaim "We've never heard of Robin Hood and have no idea whatsoever what a movie called Robin Hood should be like!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke with Stephen Lawhead about this recently. I asked him what he thought about the slow rollout of the movie. He just shook his head and said something along the lines of, "You know, you'd think that, if they wanted to make a movie about the 'historical Robin Hood', they'd talk to the experts on that subject. I've been researching this for several years. Why don't they call me?" (Don't get me wrong: He said this very humbly, and I couldn't help but agree with him.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd like to point out that I win, in the sense of being most out of step with mankind at large.

Only on the basis of low statistical sampling. You managed to hate the one most universally loved movie, but I contributed four titles to your list of 23. Still, I'm a distant second to benchwarmer, who has five titles to my four, with three titles more popular than any of mine, and whose #4 and #5 picks are more popular than my #3 and #4, respectively.

I spoke with Stephen Lawhead about this recently. I asked him what he thought about the slow rollout of the movie. He just shook his head and said something along the lines of, "You know, you'd think that, if they wanted to make a movie about the 'historical Robin Hood', they'd talk to the experts on that subject. I've been researching this for several years. Why don't they call me?" (Don't get me wrong: He said this very humbly, and I couldn't help but agree with him.)

I predict this movie is going to be about as apropos of the "historical Robin Hood" as Fuqua's King Arthur was of the "historical King Arthur."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a historical King Arthur?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a big one: NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN. A film of remarkable technical accomplishment, but otherwise, isn't all that. The Coens have gotten away with cheating the audience of payoff elsewhere, but here it's a wrongheaded move that deflates what could have been a masterpiece.

Edited by Ryan H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Truly spoken by a fellow believer who really wanted to see There Will Be Blood get the Oscar win.

(Personally, I thought they should have tied.) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terms of Adul, uh, Endearment

Just watched this awful claptrap with my wife and was totally flummoxed. Who likes this film? Seriously.

Oh Brother Where Art Thou

I think most people who say they like that movie are only remembering the soundtrack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shawshank Redemption

The Godfather (I) (I love II, just not I).

Juno

North by Northwest

The Squid and the Whale

Igby Goes Down

I'm with you on The Squid and the Whale. I didn't know there's actually anyone who likes Igby Goes Down, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you see this and make this decision when you were, like, six, or have you had a deprived childhood?

That the performances were weird is evident to anyone who is watching; even children can tell that much. How old do you think Dorothy is supposed to be in the movie? 8? 12? 16? The movie is every bit as weird and strangely conceived and performed as Benigni's Pinocchio, except that one is a universally-loved family classic and the other is a universally-reviled bomb.

And careful about casting any stones. Never forget: You are a Princess Bride hater.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been fond of The Wizard of Oz. I crept out of my room and watched it over a babysitter's shoulder one night without her knowing I was there. When the flying monkeys showed up, I went back to my room, scared out of my wits. I've watched the film a few times since then, but never really enjoyed it much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to point out that I win, in the sense of being most out of step with mankind at large.

Only on the basis of low statistical sampling. You managed to hate the one most universally loved movie, but I contributed four titles to your list of 23. Still, I'm a distant second to benchwarmer, who has five titles to my four, with three titles more popular than any of mine, and whose #4 and #5 picks are more popular than my #3 and #4, respectively.

Oh sure, I could have named more movies, but I thought The Wizard of Oz was notable enough by itself.

I can be beaten though: All we need is someone to stand up and say: "Citizen Kane? Long and dull." or "Seven Samurai? Just a rip-off of A Bug's Life."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And careful about casting any stones. Never forget: You are a Princess Bride hater.

The Wizard of Oz trumps The Princess Bride for countless reasons, not least the dynamism of TWoO's female characters versus Buttercup's utter passiveness. (I say that as one who is quite fond of TPB but whose love for TWoO is true.)

Oh sure, I could have named more movies, but I thought The Wizard of Oz was notable enough by itself.

I can be beaten though: All we need is someone to stand up and say: "Citizen Kane? Long and dull." or "Seven Samurai? Just a rip-off of A Bug's Life."

No no, I admit, it's the single boldest stroke in the whole thread.

Edited by SDG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ordet sucks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Wizard of Oz trumps The Princess Bride for countless reasons, not least the dynamism of TWOZ's female characters versus Buttercup's utter passiveness. (I say that as one who is quite fond of TPB but whose love for TWOZ is true.)

I suppose you COULD call the bizarre behavior of the female characters in The Wizard of Oz dynamism, but it isn't the description that comes immediately to my mind.

Seriously: How old do YOU think Dorothy is supposed to be in that movie?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suppose you COULD call the bizarre behavior of the female characters in The Wizard of Oz dynamism, but it isn't the description that comes immediately to my mind.

It's nothing to do with how you would describe it. Dorothy, Elmira Gulch, Aunt Em, Glinda and the Wicked Witch of the West drive the plot. Uncle Henry, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion and the Wizard mostly stand around. Except for the Scarecrow, maybe.

Meanwhile, what does Buttercup do? What is she asked to do? Trust in her Westley to come and save her, otherwise he will fetch her a biff. It's like a sick joke that this story was conceived by a father of two daughters who came up with this story in response to their request for a story about "princesses" and "brides": What father of two daughters is so X-chromosomally challenged that he conflates "princesses" and "brides" into a single character whose job is to stand stock-still in the middle of a whirl of pirates, kidnapping, giants, life-or-death duels, screaming eels, fire swamps, rodents of unusual size, torture, holocaust cloaks, etc., etc? And who doesn't even become a princess, and becomes a bride only offscreen, after the end credits?????? A sick joke, I say.

Seriously: How old do YOU think Dorothy is supposed to be in that movie?

J. M. Barrie answers: "The difference between a Fairy Play and a realistic one is that in the former all the characters are really children with a child's outlook on life. This applies to the so-called adults of the story as well as the young people. Pull the beard off the fairy king, and you would find the face of a child."

Edited by SDG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose you COULD call the bizarre behavior of the female characters in The Wizard of Oz dynamism, but it isn't the description that comes immediately to my mind.

It's nothing to do with how you would describe it. Dorothy, Elmira Gulch, Aunt Em, Glinda and the Wicked Witch of the West drive the plot. Uncle Henry, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion and the Wizard mostly stand around. Except for the Scarecrow, maybe.

Meanwhile, what does Buttercup do? What is she asked to do? Trust in her Westley to come and save her, otherwise he will fetch her a biff. It's like a sick joke that this story was conceived by a father of two daughters who came up with this story in response to their request for a story about "princesses" and "brides": What father of two daughters is so X-chromosomally challenged that he conflates "princesses" and "brides" into a single character whose job is to stand stock-still in the middle of a whirl of pirates, kidnapping, giants, life-or-death duels, screaming eels, fire swamps, rodents of unusual size, torture, holocaust cloaks, etc., etc? And who doesn't even become a princess, and becomes a bride only offscreen, after the end credits?????? A sick joke, I say.

Seriously: How old do YOU think Dorothy is supposed to be in that movie?

J. M. Barrie answers: "The difference between a Fairy Play and a realistic one is that in the former all the characters are really children with a child's outlook on life. This applies to the so-called adults of the story as well as the young people. Pull the beard off the fairy king, and you would find the face of a child."

That's an after-the-fact rationalization. Baum didn't write up a 17-year old Dorothy and then use Barrie's argument as to why she didn't act her age, he wrote up an 8-year old Dorothy. Hollywood then cast a 17-year old in the part, also for reasons that had nothing to do with any argument of Barrie's.

That Buttercup is a weak character in The Princess Bride is indisputable.

But if you claim the right to score points against The Princess Bride for its weak female characters, why cannot I score points against The Wizard of Oz for its weak male characters? I hardly see that you can advance the cause of one movie against the other with this line of argument.

Edited by bowen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...