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Tyler

Movies Everyone Except You Loves

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Disney's Winnie-the-Pooh films.

Films by Martin Scorsese. Highly technically accomplished, visually arresting films about soulless bastards.

Edited by mrmando

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Highly technically accomplished, visually arresting films about soulless bastards.

I dunno. Owl, maybe. Maybe. But that seems to me a pretty harsh judgment of Eeyore and Piglet.

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The Flowers of St. Francis.

I know everyone here raves about it but I only liked it. Maybe one day I will watch it again and change my mind but not any time soon. It took me 4 months and the rest of my nexflix DVD by mail membership to watch it.

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Saving Private Ryan - Used to love this during my Spielberg fanboy days. Now I can't stand to watch it. After the Normandy sequence, it takes a nose-dive.

First time back in this thread in a while. (The scars I received for disliking The Wizard of Oz were slow to heal.) I think this about Saving Private Ryan is absolutely true. Now, the Normandy sequence actually doesn't propel the plot at all; nothing happens in that is required to make the rest of the story intelligible. Further, in its depiction of combat, it is 180° out of phase with the rest of the movie. Now, here's my question: If the Normandy sequence had been omitted from Saving Private Ryan entirely, would anyone even remember the movie, much less regard it as great?

Edited by bowen

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Bellflower

Anything by Tarkovsky

Having seen the former last night, and now seeing it grouped with the latter, is head-spinning. :) I realize you're not drawing comparisons, but ... head-spinning.

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Bellflower

Anything by Tarkovsky

Having seen the former last night, and now seeing it grouped with the latter, is head-spinning. :) I realize you're not drawing comparisons, but ... head-spinning.

Oh gosh, I just watched Bellflower with one of my roommates this week. I was physically throwing things at the end of the movie. We were both so angry. If that's what the movie was going for: BRAVO.

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Anything by Tarkovsky

[GASP] BLASPHEMY! We burn the heretic at dawn.

Seriously though, I find differences in aesthetic wildly fascinating. I adore Tarkovsky, is there something specific you can point to that you have a distaste for, or is it a purely visceral, involuntary reaction type deal? Do you like Dreyer, Bresson or Ozu?

I have a severe allergy to all things feature length Disney animation.

Edited by Pair

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The most provocative titles I can think of at the moment:

The Two Towers.

As much as I love the trilogy as a whole, I've never been able to get into the second film. None of it works for me until the last forty-five minutes (of the extended edition) or so. After a half dozen viewings, I think I've identified the problem: Where the Fellowship of the Ring had a clear narrative thread (and, incidentally, a great halfway point), The Two Towers simply doesn't. It follows at least two or three (depending on whether you consider the Pippin and Mary thread 'major) major threads for the entirety of the film. And while individual scenes work (they're well written, acted, edited, scored, etc.) the whole thing just doesn't come together for me. It never has, and I fear it never will.

Fellowship is actually my favorite of the three, and Two Towers is probably the Tolkien book that I think offers the most goods that the film can't.

Also (this might just antagonize Overstreet), I couldn't force myself to watch more than half of The Fisher King. It's just . . . Robin Wililams being Robin Williams. You know? I think I turned the film off when he starts talking about shitting as an ecstatic spiritual experience.

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Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill, and Reservoir Dogs. Really, almost anything by Tarantino. His movies feel like technically well-made YouTube mashups. He gets praised for his dialogue and scripts, and I just don't see why waxing eloquently about a Big Mac is considered good writing.

Raging Bull. I love much of what Scorcese has done over the years, but I really struggle appreciating characters who constantly abuse and scream at each other.

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The most provocative titles I can think of at the moment:

The Two Towers.

I can be a little more provocative than that. After a recent viewing of THE LORD OF THE RINGS flicks, I found all three of 'em to be pretty lackluster, if not outright lousy.

Edited by Ryan H.

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The most provocative titles I can think of at the moment:

The Two Towers.

I can be a little more provocative than that. After a recent viewing of THE LORD OF THE RINGS flicks, I found all three of 'em to be pretty lackluster, if not outright lousy.

I'm curious, Ryan, is there a comparable film from the last decade or so that you find superior?

To me, Fellowship still looks like the best big budget adventure fantasy in an age dominated by cluttered CG nightmares.

Edited by Nathaniel

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The most provocative titles I can think of at the moment:

The Two Towers.

I can be a little more provocative than that. After a recent viewing of THE LORD OF THE RINGS flicks, I found all three of 'em to be pretty lackluster, if not outright lousy.

I'm curious, Ryan, is there a comparable film from the last decade or so that you find superior?

To me, Fellowship still looks like the best big budget adventure fantasy in an age dominated by cluttered CG nightmares.

If by "comparable film" you mean "big budget adventure fantasy" as your second comment implies, then, no, I don't think there's another big budget adventure fantasy that is better than LORD OF THE RINGS from the last decade or so, unless there's one slipping my mind. The big screen has often struggled with epic fantasy, and the efforts of the last decade have been very disappointing indeed (in no small part because they have often forced these films--LORD OF THE RINGS included--to fit the "Hollywood blockbuster" model, rather than letting them be something more unique). I do think we've seen big epic films from the past decade that are better than LORD OF THE RINGS, but none with a fantasy component.

Edited by Ryan H.

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The most provocative titles I can think of at the moment:

The Two Towers.

I can be a little more provocative than that. After a recent viewing of THE LORD OF THE RINGS flicks, I found all three of 'em to be pretty lackluster, if not outright lousy.

NOW YOU'VE TAKEN IT TOO FAR. lol.

I do pity you, though.

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I do think we've seen big epic films from the past decade that are better than LORD OF THE RINGS, but none with a fantasy component.

Do tell. I'm just trying to get a feel for your cinematic values here.

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FWIW, my fondness for both Two Towers and Return of the King has diminished considerably since they opened. Fellowship remains fairly high in my estimation for pulling off some of the most difficult parts of the epic brilliantly, but it has some sequences that I'd be happy never to see again.

Still, they're all far superior to the Star Wars prequels and that lamentable fourth Indiana Jones film.

Edited by Overstreet

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FWIW, my fondness for both Two Towers and Return of the King has diminished considerably since they opened. Fellowship remains fairly high in my estimation for pulling off some of the most difficult parts of the epic brilliantly, but it has some sequences that I'd be happy never to see again.

Still, they're all far superior to the Star Wars prequels and that lamentable fourth Indiana Jones film.

Never felt the desire to revisit TT or RoTK even once. I went back to Fellowship and continue to feel indifferent. (Still better than Magnolia, I guess.)

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Guys. These things you say.. they cut deep.

LotR is like my first love, ever since my appreciation for the films surpassed my appreciation for the novels... and I'm still overwhelmed with fascination every time I re-visit the series. I still consider it to be, without doubt, the greatest achievement in cinematic storytelling on a large scale.

..I recently watched Clockwork Orange for the second time recently and pretty much hated even more then I had the first time. I've actually never been able to really appreciate anything by Kubrick. Someone please tell me what they see in his work, besides his high standard for technical perfection..?

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..I recently watched Clockwork Orange for the second time recently and pretty much hated even more then I had the first time. I've actually never been able to really appreciate anything by Kubrick. Someone please tell me what they see in his work, besides his high standard for technical perfection..?

I'll let Ryan field this one. :)

One more note on The Lord of the Rings. Even though I do find the whole trilogy exceptional--a directorial feat of enormous energy and visual brilliance--I have to admit that its huge popularity was also a matter of fortuitous timing. The moment of LotR has perhaps passed, but it was a sensational moment, and one that fulfilled a collective need.

Edited by Nathaniel

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...ever since my appreciation for the films surpassed my appreciation for the novels...

Oh dear. The film's various betrayals of the novels are - and have always been - my primary complaint against them, even when I was in love with all three. Jackson's films cheapen, misunderstand, and actively contend with Tolkien's original stories. They get so much right, but that only makes the great deal that they get wrong hurt so much more.

But we have whole threads devoted to this subject.

Edited by Overstreet

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...ever since my appreciation for the films surpassed my appreciation for the novels...

Oh dear. The film's various betrayals of the novels are - and have always been - my primary complaint against them...

I know. But as heretical as my seemingly hasty dismissal of Tolkien's masterpiece may be, I was always capable of fully separating film from book. When I sit down to revisit the novels, I'm whisked back to the fantasy world I created in my mind back when I was ten. When I watch the films, I'm able to appreciate them in a fully different light.

..I've actually never really experienced any kind of major disorientation from films that differ from their literary predecessors. Except for The Lorax. That one gets under my skin.

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..I recently watched Clockwork Orange for the second time recently and pretty much hated even more then I had the first time. I've actually never been able to really appreciate anything by Kubrick. Someone please tell me what they see in his work, besides his high standard for technical perfection..?

Great mood/atmosphere for one. Not a coincidence, in my view, that he was drawn to filming Nabokov. I don't argue with people who don't care for Kubrick. I just feel bad for them.

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..I recently watched Clockwork Orange for the second time recently and pretty much hated even more then I had the first time. I've actually never been able to really appreciate anything by Kubrick. Someone please tell me what they see in his work, besides his high standard for technical perfection..?

Great mood/atmosphere for one.

The only atmosphere I experienced was cold, distant, and too bizarre to be taken seriously.

It makes me frustrated, really. I have no idea what it is about Kubrick that I must just be.. missing.

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LotR is like my first love

One of mine as well. As I'm sure it has been for many in our generation, ROTK was the first film I walked out of knowing without a doubt that I wanted to pursue filmmaking. I'll always cherish that, and it's for that reason that ROTK remains my favourite of the bunch (though I'd still consider the FELLOWSHIP EE as the single best version of any of the films). Subsequent visits haven't been as rapturous. The last time I watched them in full ('09, I think) I was surprised by how bland a lot of the camera staging was - just the basic coverage patterns for getting all the performances. That isn't a bad thing at all, but it is hard to go back to once you've seen and loved a film where it seems every shot is crafted with precision and registers on multiple levels of reception. Speaking of which...

..I recently watched Clockwork Orange for the second time recently and pretty much hated even more then I had the first time. I've actually never been able to really appreciate anything by Kubrick. Someone please tell me what they see in his work, besides his high standard for technical perfection..?

I too have found Kubrick difficult to warm to, and it's only since gaining some experience in production that I've grown to enjoy him, almost entirely out of respect for his technical achievements. Over time I've come to love his ability to create such intense moods, if not the actual feeling they evoke (such as CLOCKWORK, which took me about six excruciating hours to watch over one day, but that I can't quite bring myself to condemn). Don't give up yet. Not without giving 2001 a chance.

I do think we've seen big epic films from the past decade that are better than LORD OF THE RINGS, but none with a fantasy component.

Have you seen the full Chinese cut of RED CLIFF? I don't know if I'd put it above the entire achievement of LOTR in my favourite epics pantheon, but it IS a heck of a lot of fun. And unlike Jackson, Woo does lots of interesting things with his camera between battle scenes.

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