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Mr. Arkadin

Movies You Love That Are Not Loved By Everyone Else

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No joke: I loved Tombraider when I first saw it in the cinema. I haven't seen it since, but I had a riot. I was a little obsessed with the game at the time, too, which may have had an effect on my response to the film.

I also thought Beowulf was great, though I'm also unsure about critical response to this so it may have been widely acclaimed. Somehow, I doubt it.


"There is, it would seem, in the dimensional scale of the world a kind of delicate meeting place between imagination and knowledge, a point, arrived at by diminishing large things and enlarging small ones, that is intrinsically artistic" - Vladimir Nabokov

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I'm fairly certain that there are other people who like The Fountain, but I'm not sure anyone else I know who would place it in the SF pantheon along with films like 2001 and Stalker.

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I don't know anyone who likes Watchman as much as I do.

Edited by Scott Derrickson

In eternity this world will be Troy, I believe, and all that has passed here will be the epic of the universe, the ballad they sing in the streets. -- Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson

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I'm fairly certain that there are other people who like The Fountain, but I'm not sure anyone else I know who would place it in the SF pantheon along with films like 2001 and Stalker.

I like it a lot, though I wouldn't go quite that high.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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The best Tom Hanks film - The Burbs.

This is definitely something I need to watch again and soon. It is actually a perfect suggestion.

So, with all the current love for The Burbs will we have to delete all posts from this thread?


...the kind of film criticism we do. We are talking about life, and more than that the possibility of abundant life." -M.Leary

"Dad, how does she move in mysterious ways?"" -- Jude (my 5-year-old, after listening to Mysterious Ways)

[once upon a time known here as asher]

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I don't know anyone who likes Watchman as much as I do.

The movie from 1986 directed by Shankar Nag? Or the Zack Snyder movie?


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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The best Tom Hanks film - The Burbs.

This is definitely something I need to watch again and soon. It is actually a perfect suggestion.

So, with all the current love for The Burbs will we have to delete all posts from this thread?

Possibly. I had no idea that anyone other than my immediate family loved this film. You learn something new every day.

I'm sure this one won't be met with the same acceptance as The Burbs, but I really like the film Sahara - the Matthew McConaughey, Steve Zahn film. I just have a lot of fun watching that movie even though I realize it is not really that great.


"The greatest meat of all. The meat of friendship and fatherhood."

The Blue Raft - Are you ready to ride?

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-Despite its overly schematic screenplay, I love "Akeelah and the Bee" because (a). I love the lead performances, (B) I can get into weepy sentimental scenes if the actors are on, and, ©, I was once a runner-up in the state spelling bee. Akeelah understands what it felt like for me to be good at something nerdy, but she shows that you can be cool while doing it! (I don't think anyone hated this movie, but I doubt many others ran out to buy it as soon as it was released.)

-I feel like I need to boldly uphold "The Passion of the Christ" as a great film, especially now that even the portion of the demographic that once rightly praised it will forget about it for the next 10 years given Gibson's embarrassing behavior. Let's pray for some restoration to happen in this man's life.

Edited by Brian D

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I don't know if I love it, but I watched Memoirs of an Invisible Man yesterday and was pleasantly surprised. (I've been playing catch-up with all of the John Carpenter-directed movies I haven't seen, even the bad ones.) It was not great by any means, but solidly enjoyable.

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-Despite its overly schematic screenplay, I love "Akeelah and the Bee" because (a). I love the lead performances, (B) I can get into weepy sentimental scenes if the actors are on, and, ©, I was once a runner-up in the state spelling bee. Akeelah understands what it felt like for me to be good at something nerdy, but she shows that you can be cool while doing it! (I don't think anyone hated this movie, but I doubt many others ran out to buy it as soon as it was released.)

-I feel like I need to boldly uphold "The Passion of the Christ" as a great film, especially now that even the portion of the demographic that once rightly praised it will forget about it for the next 10 years given Gibson's embarrassing behavior. Let's pray for some restoration to happen in this man's life.

I'm with you on both counts. Except that we need to find a word other than "restoration" for what Gibson needs.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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-Despite its overly schematic screenplay, I love "Akeelah and the Bee" because (a). I love the lead performances, (B) I can get into weepy sentimental scenes if the actors are on, and, ©, I was once a runner-up in the state spelling bee. Akeelah understands what it felt like for me to be good at something nerdy, but she shows that you can be cool while doing it! (I don't think anyone hated this movie, but I doubt many others ran out to buy it as soon as it was released.)

I'd rather watch Spellbound (the Jeffrey Blitz documentary, not the Hitchcock movie) four more times before I'd watch Akeelah again.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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-Despite its overly schematic screenplay, I love "Akeelah and the Bee" because (a). I love the lead performances, (B) I can get into weepy sentimental scenes if the actors are on, and, ©, I was once a runner-up in the state spelling bee. Akeelah understands what it felt like for me to be good at something nerdy, but she shows that you can be cool while doing it! (I don't think anyone hated this movie, but I doubt many others ran out to buy it as soon as it was released.)

I'd rather watch Spellbound (the Jeffrey Blitz documentary, not the Hitchcock movie) four more times before I'd watch Akeelah again.

This comparison doesn't get you far, though, because on the one hand Akeelah is brimful of all kinds of sociological, interpersonal and pedagogical goodness that isn't really comparable to anything in Spellbound, and on the other hand Spellbound is doing other stuff that Akeelah doesn't do.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

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I'll definitely have to find Spellbound. One other spelling bee movie that I noticed Roger Ebert loved, but yet does not seem to be loved by everyone else, is Bee Season. I have the impression that I wouldn't be very interested in it, but has anyone seen that?

Edited by Brian D

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It's more often a case of movies I love that have not been seen by anyone else. Do they count?

John Krish's Unearthly Stranger is perhaps the best example of these. George McCowan's The Love War, a forgotten ABC Movie of the Week, would be another.

(This will be my only post until The Management decide I am not a spambot/committing heresy by thought/making inappropriate comments.)

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It's more often a case of movies I love that have not been seen by anyone else. Do they count?

I think so; in any case, I'm adding one in this category.

Last night we watched Devil in a Blue Dress, the neo-noir based on the Walter Mosley novel of the same name. And I really liked it; the atmosphere felt just about right, and Don Cheadle's turn as Mouse was crackling. Thing is, I've never met anyone who has seen this movie (or, if they didn't, never felt it worth enough to comment on).

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Last night we watched Devil in a Blue Dress, the neo-noir based on the Walter Mosley novel of the same name. And I really liked it; the atmosphere felt just about right, and Don Cheadle's turn as Mouse was crackling.

Count me in as a fan. Seen it a few times.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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I think I saw it back when it came out. But that's a while ago.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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For me, Waking the Dead was one of my favorite films for a long time, but no one else seemed to like it or care about it that much. I need to watch it again and reevaluate.

If the thread here is anything to go by... Thirst is another.

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Last night we watched Devil in a Blue Dress [snip] Thing is, I've never met anyone who has seen this movie (or, if they didn't, never felt it worth enough to comment on).

I saw it many years ago. As I recall, Jennifer Beals was quite good. That in itself was a shock.

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Bad Boys

"Loves" is a bit strong, but still...


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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It's more often a case of movies I love that have not been seen by anyone else. Do they count?

John Krish's Unearthly Stranger is perhaps the best example of these.

It's too bad Ambler didn't stick around long enough for me to read this post. I would've liked to have had a conversation with him about Unearthly Stranger. As an example of British sci-fi (a rarefied genre) it has a Nigel Kneale-like intelligence and a charged, sweaty atmosphere. Best line: "Your wife is very beautiful. She’s an alien, isn’t she?"


"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

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Resurrecting this thread because The Avengers was on TV last night and I found myself dropping everything to watch it--even though I own the DVD and the movie was over halfway finished.

It's not a good movie by any means--Fiennes in particular looks like he's sleepwalking--but I've got a very soft spot for it all the same. And I can't think of another action/adventure movie that's this stylish (or, at least, stylish in this particular way):

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