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MattPage

Eggs

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I eat three a morning most days. I like 'em pretty much any way, but scrambled is best. Fried is a little easier. Poached can be great, but I've never figured out how many minutes, exactly, to leave them in. My poached eggs are often too hard or too soft.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Ah, a favorite subject.

Currently, when I have the time I like to fry 1/2 inch slices of polenta in about oil until pretty well done, then fry two eggs just slightly past over-easy. I smear ricotta cheese on the polenta slices, and then top that with the two eggs. It is incredible.

Otherwise, I like a three minute egg with good salt and rye toast. When scrambling, I use a little bit of salt, and pepper in the mixture, cook that on very low heat while working them back and forth with a spatula (no stirring). Then when they are about 3/4 done I splash heavy cream in the pan and blend that in. Only way to go.

And then there is the glorious scotch egg. Get some good hearty sausage and some hard-boiled eggs. Case the eggs in about 1/4 inch of the sausage, then roll that in cornmeal. Then bake 'em. Caution: Do not buy these from petrol stations in the UK. Those are not good.

Edited by MLeary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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Why do you add milk to eggs? My mother did this for years when I was child, "to add volume" she explained.

Is this just a tactic to make food go a little further? I've never felt the need to add milk to my eggs.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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My mother taught me to add milk as well--not a lot. "Volume" just means that it makes the resulting scrambled eggs a bit fluffier and cohesive, rather than that mess you tend to get without it. But you should make eggs the way you like them.

Boringly, I don't care for runny yolks in any form, so fried eggs must be "over well" for me, and someone else can have the poached ones. Ew. I boil my eggs for 15 minutes. A covered-dish supper without devilled eggs is not a real covered-dish supper.

That's all I know about eggs.


There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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I get eggs from my mom's farm, free range, brown or green. I too add milk to my scrambled eggs, and fry them in a tbsp of butter. My cholesterol is 110. B)

I prefer to fry an over hard egg in the same pan I've just fried sausage in, but the kiddo's reject the extra bits. More for me I guess.

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Why do you add milk to eggs? My mother did this for years when I was child, "to add volume" she explained.

Is this just a tactic to make food go a little further? I've never felt the need to add milk to my eggs.

I thought the classic guidance was one tablespoon of milk per egg so that the final scrambled egg will have a less toothsome texture and a richer flavor. Adding a heavier cream at the end has the additional benefit of slowing the cooking process exactly when you want and adding a significant boost in flavor. The difference in texture is remarkable.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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Eggs are one of my favorites. We have free range chickens so get fresh eggs when we can get to them before the dogs do. Over easy or scrambled with bacon or pan sausage and picante sauce is good. I have also gotten pretty good at making omelettes. And of course, breakfast tacos are great: crumbled sausage, diced potatoes and onions, garlic, jalapenos, some fried corn tortilla strips, cheese and eggs wrapped in a flour tortilla.

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Fried on toast with a skiff of ranch dressing, tomato slices, crescents of red onion, and banana peppers, under a thin layer of cheese (I'm still experimenting with different kinds.)

Or scrambled with smoked salmon, capers, and cheese.

MLeary... the polenta idea sounds incredible. I'm going to try that.

Edited by Overstreet

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Scrambled. Easy to do. :)

We also use this toaster-on-steroids--toasts the muffins and cooks the eggs (scrambled) all at the same time.

Egg salad is also a favorite--based on the fact I made egg salad from a dozen eggs yesterday and it was gone today. 8O


I like to say that I practice militant mysticism. I'm really absolutely sure of some things that I don't quite know.~~Rob Bell April/09 CT

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Sunnyside up w/soft yolk (I live dangerously). I prefer to fry them in the pan the sausage/bacon/New Jersey pork roll was just fried in and with a touch of salt and ground white pepper. Omelets are cool too. I've taken to using water with eggs for fluffiness. Milk doesn't seem to cause eggs to fluff as much and water seems to blend with the eggwhite well, while milk and cream often leave a watery residue that does not congeal.

I've experimented with a banana omelet that containes mascarpone cheese or the fake variety (equal parts sour cream and softened cream cheese) mixed with mashed banana, a sprinkling of granulated garlic, white pepper, salt and a half teaspoon of sugar. No one likes it but me. Most won't even try something called a banana omelet (with or without knowledge of the garlic [for savory counterpoint]).

Edited by Rich Kennedy

"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Usually scrambled. Poached (medium to hard) is ok, especially in Bennies. Had Scotched eggs as an appitizer at a

British pub restaurant a while back - quite nice.

My wife has been battling to find a way of doing shirred eggs that turns out the way she likes - it a trial. The yoke gets hard and the white is still gelatinous most of the time.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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while milk and cream often leave a watery residue that does not congeal.

Indeed. Adding it towards the end of the cooking cycle helps with this, as the cream/milk does not have long enough to shuffle off any residue.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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For omelet fans, if you're ever in Sedona, take in the Coffee Pot Restaurant (with a great name for the obviously named Coffee Pot Rock). 101 omelets, including PB&J, or you can have them make one special if there's nothing there you like.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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I should also note that my favorite way to have eggs is French Toast.

15-20 year ago, I'd often have eggs by putting them in a blender with orange or apple juice.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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while milk and cream often leave a watery residue that does not congeal.

Indeed. Adding it towards the end of the cooking cycle helps with this, as the cream/milk does not have long enough to shuffle off any residue.

This would be for scrambled eggs, I presume? Logistics would really get in the way for an omelet, I think.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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