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John Drew

The Walking Dead

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I just re-watched the first episode, and I still don't understand something. Why did Morgan start shooting the zombies when he knew that they would come after him? I didn't get that scene at all.

I think he knew the danger but, IIRC, I think he also mentioned to Rick that the zombies in the neighborhood weren't as prevalent during the day. Also, he was trying to stir them up in hopes that his wife would appear.

A question I had, that may be answered in the comics, do these zombies rest or sleep? That would be something different from other zombie franchises. I refer to the zombies that appeared to be resting in the bus when Rick rides into Atlanta, as well as the zombie in the tank. George Romero zombies seem to be like sharks, always on the move, never "resting". And since I don't consider the "rage" infected humans from 28 days later... to be zombies, the few that seem to be resting in the church in that film would not count as a comparison.

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A question I had, that may be answered in the comics, do these zombies rest or sleep? That would be something different from other zombie franchises. I refer to the zombies that appeared to be resting in the bus when Rick rides into Atlanta, as well as the zombie in the tank. George Romero zombies seem to be like sharks, always on the move, never "resting". And since I don't consider the "rage" infected humans from 28 days later... to be zombies, the few that seem to be resting in the church in that film would not count as a comparison.

It may or may not apply here, but in the comics I recall, the zombies don't sleep, but can be divided between "Walkers" and "Resters." That is, some zombies are significantly more aggressive than others, and some just seem to sit around doing nothing but moaning occasionally. Characters would often find such zombies lying around in hallways of deserted buildings.

One twist I'm particularly interested to see if they keep in the comics is whether:

People come back as zombies whether they are bitten or not. It's a twist introduced in vol. 3 of the comics, which opens up a lot of questions about how the infection works.

But the books are less concerned about the hows and what's of the zombies than the people's reaction to it. I think Kirkman may have flat out stated that he will never completely explain the cause of the virus plague in the books.

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I was pretty upset by last night's episode. Apparently, zombies can smell you, and your smell can be masked by a generous application of zombie guts.

Why didn't anyone ever tell me this? It changes everything.

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I finally watched the pilot on Hulu (thanks for the link, Tyler!) and was smitten enough to order a season pass on Amazon. I won't repeat what others already posted, but it exceeded my high expectations. I've seen some slightly less-enthused buzz surrounding the second episode, but I'm excited regardless to watch when I get home from work.

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I finally watched the pilot on Hulu (thanks for the link, Tyler!) and was smitten enough to order a season pass on Amazon. I won't repeat what others already posted, but it exceeded my high expectations. I've seen some slightly less-enthused buzz surrounding the second episode, but I'm excited regardless to watch when I get home from work.

That's unfortunate, because I really thought it was better than the opener. While I thought the opener was terrific, it didn't actually offer a lot of scares, as far as I was concerned. But the second episode had moments that really got under my skin.

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That's unfortunate, because I really thought it was better than the opener. While I thought the opener was terrific, it didn't actually offer a lot of scares, as far as I was concerned. But the second episode had moments that really got under my skin.

I definitely agree — I thought the pilot was fantastic as far as storytelling goes (and had a lot of genuinely heartrending moments), but "Guts" was really thrilling. They really deviated from the comic in some spots, and for the better:

If I'm correct, the whole segment in the comic focuses on just Glenn and Rick trying to get out of the city after some looting. They were able to get a whole episode out of that plus introduce some of the characters.

Michael Rooker's Merle character was ridiculously over the top, and I feel like they're setting him up for something more.

Actually, the only character introduced with Glenn's raiding party that's in the comic is Andrea, who, well, is a pretty significant character.

Even though the first season is only six episodes, it seems like they're taking their time covering elements from the comic. If you're familiar with the comic —

seems like they'll have the season end with the gang leaving the Atlanta area, and with some of the cast leaving, if you know what I mean.

Edited by Jason Panella

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Anyone see last night's episode, "Tell It To the Frogs"?

I felt like it was a great follow-up to last week's more action-focused episode.

Things I liked:

-Rick's arrival back to camp, which was emotionally complex without getting obnoxious.

-Dale actually getting some screen time.

-Glenn glumly watching as his companions dismantle the Dodge Challenger.

-"Hey now, you better chose your words carefully." "No, I have — douchebag is what I meant."

And even if the Merle situation was telegraphed quite clearly last episode, the cold open for this episode was kind of tense and terrifying. Guess Dale's tool bag came in use, huh?

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The final image of

the bloody cuffs leading to the severed hand

was chilling.

It was a great episode, and like the book, proved it could sustain itself with little zombie presence. It's the people that are driving the story.

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I finally watched the first episode, and besides the geek factor of Lennie James (Jericho), Laurie Holden (X-Files), and music by Bear McCreary (Battlestar Galactica)--although I don't recall a lot of music in the show--I thought the most impressive thing was the way it set a tone with silence and stillness (I could easily see several shots as graphic novel panels).

One thing that puzzled me, though: Since Rick shoots the little girl zombie in the opening scene, we know there were zombies before he got shot, but the world seemed relatively orderly and controlled. When Rick wakes up in the hospital (which totally ripped off 28 Days Later, but I'm okay with that) and starts wandering around, though, the zombie problem seems a lot more advanced than it had been before. Was he out for a really long time? Was I misreading the order of the world at the beginning? Is there some development in later episodes that explains this stuff that I just need to wait for?

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It's a bit of a time trick. The little girl sequence takes place after he is shot and wakes up. He's going to the gas station to get gas for the car and is on his way to Atlanta. Then it jumps back in time to before the zombie invasion when Rick gets shot.

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One tell-tale sign is that Rick has the gas can in the 'intro,' and has the same gas can when he later finds the horse.

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It's a bit of a time trick. The little girl sequence takes place after he is shot and wakes up. He's going to the gas station to get gas for the car and is on his way to Atlanta. Then it jumps back in time to before the zombie invasion when Rick gets shot.

Okay. That makes more sense now. Thanks!

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I was pretty upset by last night's episode. Apparently, zombies can smell you, and your smell can be masked by a generous application of zombie guts.

Why didn't anyone ever tell me this? It changes everything.

This helps me a lot since I live in Atlanta. I can't TELL you how many zombies I have to dodge in the course of a day.

Joe

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Loving it so far, especially episode 3. The scene between

Ed, Carol, and Shane (along with the gradual reveals of camp dynamics)

was the most terrifying/fascinating thing I've seen yet, way more so than any old zombie. And Norman Reedus was an inspired casting choice, I must say.

I generally stay away from all scary/horror movies, but this show has got me hooked.

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I was pretty upset by last night's episode. Apparently, zombies can smell you, and your smell can be masked by a generous application of zombie guts.

Why didn't anyone ever tell me this? It changes everything.

This helps me a lot since I live in Atlanta. I can't TELL you how many zombies I have to dodge in the course of a day.

Joe

I'm in Athens about an hour away. Can't remember the last time I saw so much kudzu on screen.

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I've just caught episodes #3 and #4, but I'm enjoying it. I've had zombie ennui lately (zommui?) so I wasn't all that keen on the idea, but I've enjoyed this riff on Romero's world. The conversation in the fishing boat between the two sisters was an awkwardly-handled realization away from being perfect. Apparently, though, there's some lag in the zombie transformation in this iteration; I'm sure I wasn't the only one who while watching that last scene was a bit worried that the comforting sister was about to get her arm chewed off by her newly-dead sibling.

Of course, the bit about the guys fronting as a gang when they were propping up a care home was kinda dumb.

If nothing else, though, this show will end up being the NYPD Blue for people eating human flesh.

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I've just caught episodes #3 and #4, but I'm enjoying it. I've had zombie ennui lately (zommui?) so I wasn't all that keen on the idea, but I've enjoyed this riff on Romero's world. The conversation in the fishing boat between the two sisters was an awkwardly-handled realization away from being perfect. Apparently, though, there's some lag in the zombie transformation in this iteration; I'm sure I wasn't the only one who while watching that last scene was a bit worried that the comforting sister was about to get her arm chewed off by her newly-dead sibling.

Of course, the bit about the guys fronting as a gang when they were propping up a care home was kinda dumb.

Yeah, the Vatos deal was hokey, but oddly endearing. I like how the posturing dropped once Rick and gang figured out what was up. (Also, what WAS Rick's plan to get Glenn back? This was one case where no plan would've been better than one that involved pointing three guns at 40 people with guns.)

The episode was still pretty enjoyable — I especially like how both T-Dog and Daryl actually feel like somewhat believable characters (and not eye-rolling, complaint/slur-shouting archetypes). Also, I dug Pittsburgh native/zombie makeup master Greg Nicotero's brief cameo on screen as

the zombie that takes a big bite out of Amy.

Also worth noting: the episode was written by Robert Kirkman, creator of the Walking Dead comic. Stilted dialogue and plotting aside, not bad for a first attempt — and nice to see how added on to his original plotline from the comics.

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Can't believe I missed Nicotero's cameo! Have you read the comic, Jason (or anybody)? Is it any good?

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Can't believe I missed Nicotero's cameo! Have you read the comic, Jason (or anybody)? Is it any good?

Yes, I read up through six or seven of the paper-bound trade collections (they're at 12 or 13 now). It's very good. It falters from time to time, but I only gave up after my Bleak-o-meter was in the red. The comic is absolutely brutal, but, as it's been pointed out, that's one reason it's compelling. I think I might start it up again; Nezpop, another reader, did a nice job convincing me a few pages back in this thread.

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I didn't like the Vatos thing even before they brought in the nursing home angle, but the ending of the episode just about made up for it.

By the way, will they ever explain what caused the zombie apocalypse, or is it meant to be more like The Road or Time of the Wolf, where the effects are so important the cause is immaterial?

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By the way, will they ever explain what caused the zombie apocalypse, or is it meant to be more like The Road or Time of the Wolf, where the effects are so important the cause is immaterial?

I'm thinking the latter.

As far as I know, the comic doesn't get into it too much; the one character that claims to be a scientist and wants to find a cure is really a high school chemistry teacher. Seems like Kirkman will tackle it some day, but he's happy just dealing with the fallout in the meantime.

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Yeah, there's nothing good that can come from trying to explain it or trace it. I always love how in NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, riffing on the disaster movies of the 50s, there's talk of the plague being the result of some exterrestrial force, complete with cutaways of experts with bad combovers getting out of cars and going into the Capitol. In DAWN OF THE DEAD, the only explanation posited is the voodoo/spiritual one: there's no more room in hell.

Besides, the last apocalyptic comic I read-- Y: THE LAST MAN-- got really stupid when it tried to explain why the plague happened and why it didn't kill everybody.

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Rick talking to Morgan on his walkie reminded me of Agent Cooper recording his notes for Diane.

Noah Emmerich! (He played the CDC guy, whose name is apparently

Dr. Jenner.) I've liked him ever since he played Marlon in The Truman Show. The inside of the CDC fortress looks like the war room from Dr. Strangelove crossed with the hatch from Lost.

Edited by Tyler

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Interesting that that they used the main theme from Sunshine during the evacuation montage; though with a talent like Bear Mcreary composing, I wish they wouldn't waste time on using other scores.

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