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John Drew

The Walking Dead

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Last season, I thought they didn't know what to do with the kids. But I didn't think they would kill both of them off(?) in the first episode.

The Horde sequence at the beginning was great, while the rest of the episode dragged a bit. With the arc of the episode, though, it should have felt like that.

[edit]

Morgan : Rick

Diane : Dale Cooper

Edited by Tyler

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Is anyone else bothered by crucifixes in Protestant churches?

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That has come up a lot on the web sites I have been frequenting...even from people who are not Christians of any stripe.

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Is anyone else bothered by crucifixes in Protestant churches?

I watched the episode last night (thanks to AMC, for streaming it from their site), and laughed every time they showed this.

For the most part, I liked the episode. It had a lot of the same problems that plagued the first season (dialogue! pacing! acting!), but there were some bright spots. And some of the set pieces were just incredible. The highway scene in particular was great.

I also liked seeing Daryl take a few steps toward actually becoming a real character.

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Is anyone else bothered by crucifixes in Protestant churches?

Ha. As a Lutheran Christian, I'll posit that they stumbled into a Lutheran church. ;) Seriously, though, was there anything on-screen to signify the denomination? We're presuming that it wasn't from a pro-crucifix tradition because the design of the church resembled the sort of smallish, country church that'd normally be Baptist or non-denominational or Pentecostal, particularly in the south, right?

Hey, the show's fairly clumsy with everything that doesn't involve the zombies themselves, so the odds are that they just fudged it for dramatic effect. It's a lot less direct to complain to a couple of sticks, would be the world's thinking. It's up to us to take it to the next level and ask whether these appropriations of symbols, placed in this context, has anything of larger theological import to say. For example, nobody ever sets a "yell at/cry to God" scene like this inside one of those modern megachurches with its worship space indistinguishable from a lecture hall or capable of doubling as a basketball court.

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Ha. As a Lutheran Christian, I'll posit that they stumbled into a Lutheran church. ;) Seriously, though, was there anything on-screen to signify the denomination? We're presuming that it wasn't from a pro-crucifix tradition because the design of the church resembled the sort of smallish, country church that'd normally be Baptist or non-denominational or Pentecostal, particularly in the south, right?

There was a sign outside the church that said it was Southern Baptist ("Bikers Welcome!").

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It's a lot less direct to complain to a couple of sticks, would be the world's thinking. It's up to us to take it to the next level and ask whether these appropriations of symbols, placed in this context, has anything of larger theological import to say.

:D Yes, it might say a great deal about how symbols are received by the larger culture. A similar crucifix plays a prominent role in Leap of Faith, BTW.

For example, nobody ever sets a "yell at/cry to God" scene like this inside one of those modern megachurches with its worship space indistinguishable from a lecture hall or capable of doubling as a basketball court.

Not a megachurch, but IIRC the church in Cool Hand Luke was rather unadorned. Pretty sure it didn't contain a crucifix.

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There was a sign outside the church that said it was Southern Baptist ("Bikers Welcome!").

Ah, my bad.

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Just caught up with this show--what with only six episodes, made for a good week's viewing during my treadmill time. And then was pleased to see AMC offering up the premiere on the website. I found it really compelling, but even as I read through the thread, where people comment on the writing, I find myself going back and seeing that for such a tension filled show, it does go for long chunks of time of down time. The possible undercurrent of tension between the group of survivors seems almost too under-toned.

But, Ed Jenner? What was on the nose about that? I missed it.

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But, Ed Jenner? What was on the nose about that?

This.

Edited by mrmando

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Oh, that type of Lost reference. I was racking my brain trying to come up with a character on Lost named Jenner. I came up with a rat from NiMH.

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Is it s a bad sign that getting chased by zombies and hiding from them felt anticlimactic? It's not the first time that's happened, and I'm sure it won't be the last.

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And I didn't quite get that. Plan A was to run? Run where?

The era of quality television is over. The zombies ate it.

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And I didn't quite get that. Plan A was to run? Run where?

The era of quality television is over. The zombies ate it.

I think plan A was the walkers would still be distracted by the flares after they got the supplies from the trailer, so they could slip away without being noticed. Not like that's all that satisfying, though.

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If mopey other cop guy [Googles name] Shane really does turn into a zombie, I think I'd be okay with that.

My enthusiasm for this show is waning, and fast.

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I keep hoping that we'll circle back around to Merle and the Lennie James character, to see what became of them ... maybe even to Jim, the guy they left by the side of the road with a loaded pistol.

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"Hercules" at AICN:

Only about 6,630 Americans die each day. How did a handful of decaying corpses awaiting burial (most derived, no doubt, from the very, very elderly) manage to outwit and overwhelm more than 70 million U.S. gun owners, more than 37 million U.S. golf club owners, the 48 million U.S. fireplace poker owners, more than 94 million baseball bat owners, more than 12 million pool cue owners, more than 33 million croquet mallet owners, more than 270 million car owners, more than 25,000 municipal and country police forces, more than 450,000 U.S. national guardsmen, and more than 565,000 U.S. army reservists, to say nothing of more than 560,000 active U.S. army personnel, more than 200,000 heavily armed and armored U.S. Marines, SEAL Teams one through five, 3.2 million South Korean reservists, the Chinese, Indian and Pakistani armies, and the Taliban?

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I keep hoping that we'll circle back around to Merle and the Lennie James character, to see what became of them ... maybe even to Jim, the guy they left by the side of the road with a loaded pistol.

For the former two, I think they will. For the latter, I doubt it.

Spoiler for comic:

I'm amazed that Shane has survived this long on the show, since he was killed off in the FIRST ISSUE OF THE COMIC. I'm guessing they're keeping him around because of the love triangle?

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"Hercules" at AICN:

Only about 6,630 Americans die each day...

Does anyone really need me to quote at length Hitchcock's statements about dull critics with plausibility preoccupations?

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"Hercules" at AICN:

Only about 6,630 Americans die each day...

Does anyone really need me to quote at length Hitchcock's statements about dull critics with plausibility preoccupations?

Call it a preoccupation if you want, but Hercules does go on to explain his question in light of the fact that these characters' lives depend on strategizing against the zombies, and it would be nice if the show made more of an effort somewhere along the way to explain how things tipped in the dead's favour. One of the few appeals of this show is its potential for getting into the practical details of a day-to-day disaster situation and I can't imagine it would have been greenlit if the BS:G remake didn't prove there was an audience hungry for genre fare given the realist treatment. I don't think it's too much to ask for some plausibility, not when TWD is unfolding in an age of television that is celebrated for its slower-paced and more novelistic shows.

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I don't find it that hard to believe. According to Kirkman, the world the story takes place in lacked things like Romero zombie movies, so they are operating in a world where the fight against zombies required a learning curve.

Also, no doubt that the attacks by the initial dead resulted in many more zombies. Fresher zombies were faster zombies. It is hardly implausible that folks might get overwhelmed, especially since shooting deer is not like shooting humans and the large amount of gun owners are not special ops trained, which can result in less accuracy and more danger. And honestly? I cannot see the Taliban successfully beating back zombies.

Being armed is very different from being an effective fighter.

Edited by Nezpop

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Anyone still watching this? I finally got caught up on the last couple episodes tonight. I don't really have much to say about except: Walkers being kept in the barn and fed chickens? Stupid.

I didn't realize that they were splitting season 2 into two chunks until tonight. Apparently, next week is the "mid-season finale" and they'll finish the season in February/March. Probably not a bad idea for them. AMC doesn't want to risk their most popular show being forgotten before next fall, I guess.

So, far season 2 feels more aimless than season 1. Last season they just made trips back and forth to Atlanta. This season they just get into various pickles whilst searching for Sophia. That's it. I'm totally fine with shows that put plot on the back burner in order to explore characters but in order to do that the characters have to be, ya know, interesting. I will say this, Shane is becoming simultaneously more annoying AND more interesting to me.

Regardless of my complaints, this show has some pretty good cold opens from time to time and I've really grown to love the opening theme song and credits.

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Two or three weeks ago I said to my wife, "You know what I really love about my favorite AMC shows? There's a lot of talking and nothing happens. You know what I really hate about THE WALKING DEAD? There's a lot of talking and nothing happens."

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Anyone still watching this? I finally got caught up on the last couple episodes tonight. I don't really have much to say about except: Walkers being kept in the barn and fed chickens? Stupid.

I gave up a few weeks ago. I thought they would go there (blacked-out part), though.

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