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Buckeye Jones

Review Haiku

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Sow's ear of a play

Becomes silk purse of a film.

Twigs in place of hands.

Titus

Indeed. And credit to Ron Reed for the first two lines.

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Hard boiled detective

Asks to be or not to be.

Lost like tears in rain.

Shutter Island

nope.

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Hard boiled detective

Asks to be or not to be.

Lost like tears in rain.

Shutter Island

nope.

Dang. One more shot before I go to bed: Witness?

Warmer :)

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Hard boiled detective

Asks to be or not to be.

Lost like tears in rain.

Shutter Island

nope.

Dang. One more shot before I go to bed: Witness?

Warmer :)

Ah, Blade Runner

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Hard boiled detective

Asks to be or not to be.

Lost like tears in rain.

Shutter Island

nope.

Dang. One more shot before I go to bed: Witness?

Warmer :)

Ah, Blade Runner

There ya go.

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SDG   
Elwood says he knows

An invisible giant

Pixelate yourself

Harvey, of course.

It should be noted that in some cases other films the writer was not thinking of may fit a haiku no less aptly than the "right" film. For example, there are probably a number of films that fit "Hard boiled detective" more or less as aptly as Blade Runner. (How about D.O.A.?)

Ideally, the "right" movie should be the key that uniquely unlocks the haiku. (The right movie should make you say "Of course!") However, in some cases it may be just as interesting to find other unexpected keys that do the job just as well.

Edited by SDG

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SDG wrote:

: For example, there are probably a number of films that fit "Hard boiled detective" more or less as aptly as Blade Runner. (How about D.O.A.?)

Hmmm, I dunno. The point of D.O.A. is that the main character is investigating HIS OWN murder and not someone else's -- and in the 1980s version of that film, the main character was a professor, not a detective. I can't remember what the main character was in the 1950s version (or in the 1960s version, which was called Color Me Dead, for that matter).

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SDG   
: (How about D.O.A.?)

Hmmm, I dunno. The point of D.O.A. is that the main character is investigating HIS OWN murder and not someone else's

How does that make it not fit the haiku?

Anyway, like I said, there are probably any number of hard boiled detectives lost in rainy noirs for whom "To be or not to be" is a more or less appropriate maxim. If I knew noir better I could tell you what they were. :)

Yep. Every word in that haiku was taken from a line of dialogue in the film. :)

Oh, sweet. I didn't realize that the last line wasn't just your editorializing. :)

FWIW, my Sabrina haiku is close to that: All three lines allude more or less directly to lines from the film ("the moon is reaching for me"; "you'll miss the boat"; "don't worry, I won't miss the boat"; "I used to watch you ... standing up there in that tree").

Not as neat as yours ... although I do cover more of the plot. :)

Edited by SDG

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Grumpy general

Fights for your entertainment.

Say, moral quand’ry?

Gladiator?

You unleashed it.

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SDG wrote:

: How does that make it not fit the haiku?

Well, either the film features a detective (hard boiled or otherwise) or it doesn't. And I'm pretty sure the remake version doesn't. The original version might, though; I can't remember the profession of the character who investigates his own murder in that one.

: Anyway, like I said, there are probably any number of hard boiled detectives lost in rainy noirs for whom "To be or not to be" is a more or less appropriate maxim.

Oh yeah. There's a lot of existentialism to go around in that genre. :)

: Oh, sweet. I didn't realize that the last line wasn't just your editorializing. :)

Yeah, that last line comes from the scene in which the studio bosses decide to destroy all copies of the movie-within-the-movie to prevent the one character from ever stepping off the screen again. They happen to be sitting inside the movie theatre's office when they make this decision, and as they make it, the movie theatre owner says, "What a shame, it was such a good picture."

: Not as neat as yours ... although I do cover more of the plot. :)

Heh. True, but I think sum up some of the key THEMES, at least. Especially when you know the subtext to those lines, or the contexts in which they appear. :)

Incidentally, I was dying to find some way to use the line "There's no story. Mrs Lubitz likes a story" in my haiku, but everything I could think of used too many syllables. And I didn't even TRY to use "I want what happened in the movie last week to happen this week, otherwise what's life all about anyway?"

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SDG wrote:

: How does that make it not fit the haiku?

Well, either the film features a detective (hard boiled or otherwise) or it doesn't. And I'm pretty sure the remake version doesn't. The original version might, though; I can't remember the profession of the character who investigates his own murder in that one.

: Anyway, like I said, there are probably any number of hard boiled detectives lost in rainy noirs for whom "To be or not to be" is a more or less appropriate maxim.

Oh yeah. There's a lot of existentialism to go around in that genre. :)

FWIW, the last line of Cunningham's haiku - Lost like tears in rain - is about as Blade Runner specific as you can get. Maybe he could have worked in a reference to "Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion." ;)

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SDG   
FWIW, the last line of Cunningham's haiku - Lost like tears in rain - is about as Blade Runner specific as you can get. Maybe he could have worked in a reference to "Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion." ;)
FWIW, "like tears in rain" is also a quote from Blade Runner.

Zing! That does it then.

Sometimes the smallest

will have to journey farthest

to end corruption.

This makes me think of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.

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Sometimes the smallest

will have to journey farthest

to end corruption.

This makes me think of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.

Not the movie I was going for, but a really impressive interpretation. Especially when you think about the kids trying to rally around Mr. Smith, and being thwarted for their efforts. I haven't seen that film in years.

I will say that I wrote this haiku with the idea of seeing what alternate titles might be thrown out, other than the one I'm alluding to.

Edited by Baal_T'shuvah

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opus   

Sometimes the smallest

will have to journey farthest

to end corruption.

Lord of the Rings?

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SDG   
Lord of the Rings?

Oo, good one. That's the first one that sounds like it could actually be it.

Although on second thought I don't know about "fighting corruption."

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Sometimes the smallest

will have to journey farthest

to end corruption.

Lord of the Rings?

That's the one.

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