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Peter T Chattaway

The Age of Adaline

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Katherine Heigl to star in 'Age of Adaline'

Katherine Heigl will get to live every movie star's dream of never growing old in "The Age of Adaline," an epic love story that Lakeshore Entertainment and Sidney Kimmel will co-finance and co-produce.

Mills Goodloe and Sal Paskowitz wrote the script, centering on a young woman, born at the turn of 20th century, who is rendered ageless after an accident. After years of a solitary life, she meets a man who might be worth losing her immortality. . . .

Hollywood Reporter, May 12

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Katherine Heigl Out Of 'Adaline'

EXCLUSIVE: Katherine Heigl this morning withdrew from Adaline, the Lakeshore/Kimmel Entertainment-produced film that was to begin production in March. Word has circulated that there was some acrimony involved, but both Lakeshore and the actress' camp deny this. Heigl just adopted a daughter, and wasn't ready to go back to work.

The role will be re-cast, immediately. . . .

Mike Fleming, Deadline.com, November 15

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'Elegy' Director Boards Fantasy Romance 'Age of Adaline' (Exclusive)

Spanish director Isabel Coixet has signed on to direct The Age of Adaline, a fantasy romance being made by Lakeshore Entertainment, Sydney Kimmel Entertainment and Anonymous Content. . . .

Coixet is known for her pensive romantic dramas such as 2003’s My Life Without Me, which starred Sarah Polley and Mark Ruffalo, 2005’s Secret Life of Words, with Polley and Tim Robbins, and 2008’s Elegy, which starred Penelope Cruz and Ben Kingsley.

She also directed The Map Sounds of Tokyo, a thriller featuring a mostly Japanese cast which was not released in the U.S. . . .

Hollywood Reporter, May 14

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Our first update in over two years... and it looks like the film is actually made now, but with a different director and lead actress than any of the previous reports indicated:

 

- - -

 

Lionsgate Dates ‘The Age Of Adaline’

Blake Lively starrer The Age Of Adaline will open wide on January 23, Lionsgate announced today. The romantic drama from director Lee Toland Krieger tracks a 29-year-old woman (Lively) who stops aging after an accident and embarks on a series of incredible adventures throughout the 20th century until she meets a man who forever alters her isolated life. Adaline will face off against Universal’s thriller The Boy Next Door on the January date. Harrison Ford, Michiel Huisman, Ellen Burstyn, Amanda Crew, and Kathy Baker also star in the pic scripted by J. Mills Goodloe and Salvador Paskowitz with revisions by Allison Burnett. . . .

Deadline.com, August 15

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Who's playing the young Harrison Ford here? (And apart from River Phoenix and all the other "young Indiana Joneses", how many other actors have played a young Harrison Ford?)

 

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I noticed him during the trailer and thought... wow. That's the most impressive bit of casting for physical resemblance to an older actor I can think of. If that guy is a good actor, I think we have our Indiana Jones replacement.

 

I've been watching Agents of Shield, and the guy they've got playing "Young Ward" doesn't look anything like "Adult Ward" to me. Not at all.

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Who's playing the young Harrison Ford here? (And apart from River Phoenix and all the other "young Indiana Joneses", how many other actors have played a young Harrison Ford?)

 

 

Not really an actor playing a young Harrison Ford, but I just read this last night and found it interesting.  Some behind-the-scenes moments from the 2007 restoration of Blade Runner...

 

Another visible error occurs when Deckard (Harrison Ford) visits the artificial snake merchant, Abdul Ben-Hassan (Ben Astar). During this scene Deckard’s lip movements do not synchronize with the dialogue that he is speaking, and at the end of the scene his mouth moves but Ben-Hassan’s voice is heard. In the Workprint cut of the film, this was not an issue, due to the fact that the dialogue wasn’t changed until after the Denver and Dallas sneak previews. The producers of Blade Runner decided that the existing dialogue needed to be changed as it didn’t provide enough insight into their character’s motivations.

 

Hoping to find the original dialogue that matched the scene in the Domestic Cut, the restoration team combed through all of the audio elements that Ford and the voice actor filling in for Astar had recorded in post-production. The team was unable to locate the matching elements. Although the idea of digitally replacing Ford’s head was discussed, it was decided against, as this would mean drastically altering his performance.

 

The team determined that if it was acceptable to replace (Lee) Pulford’s head with (Joanna) Cassidy’s, then it would be acceptable to replace Ford’s mouth with his own, as the goal was to keep as much of the original performance as possible. However Ford was unable to participate, and a different solution was found, utilizing Ford’s own son, Ben as a replacement for his father’s mouth. Coincidentally, Ben was the same age as his father when Blade Runner was shot, and his lower facial features also matched his father’s. Ben was brought in to read the dialogue from the film in front of a green screen where his chin, mouth and lower face were recorded and subsequently superimposed upon the footage of his father.

 

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Just handed in a review. It's mixed - I shouldn't say yet whether it leans positive or negative - but I wanted to share that this movie led to one of the more heated post-screening discussions among WAFCA critics. If that discussion is a microcosm of broader critical reaction, I suspect some here will like the film, with caveats, while others will express outright disdain over plausibility issues or for certain performers.

 

For now, I'll just add that Harrison Ford still has the capacity to surprise me. I've always liked the guy, but as an actor, I've not been as enamored with him over the course of his career as others here seem to have been. But with 42 and now this, I find myself responding positively to the guy's performances in ways I haven't in years.

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My review:

 

If every major plot development in the film is telegraphed and obvious, the first two acts are nevertheless engaging for their leisurely pace, quite tone, and Blake Lively’s exquisite performance. She portrays Adaline’s age with a slow, deliberate cadence and a refusal to over-emote. “I think your food is burning,” she tells Ellis at his apartment, with a matter-of-fact quietness that conveys someone who has seen too much and feels too stretched to invest energy in life’s little ups and downs.

 

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I was a bit more negative on this film than Ken was, although it's interesting to see that he thinks the movie's strengths are where I see the film at its weakest.

 

In any event, I didn't dislike the film -- a word that would've come close to capturing my reaction an hour into this thing -- but I could tell that the film had, by its end, some impact, even as such heartstrings-pulling came against a voiceover that Spells Out Something The Audience Already Pretty Much Understands. It's stuff like that that had me chuckling and shaking my head at the same time as I felt, well, kind of touched by the movie.

 

So I wondered, as I left the theater, if this was the kind of movie that will linger in the mind and gradually find its audience. The next day, Matt Zoller Seitz, in his three-star review, called the film the new Somewhere in Time -- another romantic film that was laughed at by critics, but which became a favorite on home video. (I vaguely remember this happening when I was a young teen, but I wasn't part of the fan base and didn't see the film until I was in my late 20s and dating my soon-to-be wife, who chose it as our video selection one evening).

 

Now Deadline reports that the film received an A- Cinemascore -- a flaky measuring device for theatrical box-office performance, but one that tells you, I suppose, how word of mouth might go with this film, even if it takes months, or years, to spread.

Edited by Christian

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This has been playing on Prime Video for awhile now, and I just got to it.  I wasn't very impressed.  I didn't know much other than what was in the trailer, which was that she was immortal-lite and was at one time in love with Harrison Ford.  Of course, knowing that, spoilers abound.

 

Abounding spoilers:

Of course, knowing that, then as soon as she let herself get a little close to the rich dude, Ellis, who uncannily looks like the only other famous movie Ellis--you know who I mean, or my respect for your cinemaphile credentials is now sub-zero--anyway, Ellis, of course would turn out to be Harrison Ford's kid.  Ick.  Of course, the movie touched on this a little bit, but not with any real insight other than his character's wife of forty years is upset that Ford, an astronomer named William, is now reminiscing about an old flame he's never talked about who turns out to be the supposed mother of son Ellis's girlfriend.  To be fair, I think for the most part, Ford acquits himself well with the role, but the script is such a hamfisted letdown that had me rolling my eyes from the luminescent hanger ceiling to the quick toss of the keys from father to son:

"Do you love her, son?"  

"Yep, dad, sure do!"  

"Cool, I do too!  She's the one that got away, but maybe the family can reel her in this time!"  Tosses keys.  Cue electricae ex machina.

The Ellis character and the relationship between William and Ellis and Adaline ruined this story for me (the pretentious voiceover didn't help much either).  I just never bought Ellis as a character.  He was flawless--young, rich, erudite, honorable, kind, passionate about first edition books and old boats.  He drove an old Saab for goodness sake.  So the narrative that this too-perfect pretty rich guy turns out to be the only son of the one guy after Adaline's original husband that she fell in love with and caused her to desist dating at all is too much, it's too contrived.  It's also icky!  Not to get all puritanical or whatever, but the dad's cheering on the son for getting together with the girl that got away--its too much to just take straight.  Maybe if you want to get all kind of Sophocles about it, you can bring some real pathos and wrenching drama to it, but nope, Dad's cool!  At least he gets his comet in the end. Why have this be the relationship if you don't want to do something interesting with it?  But nope, Dad's nice--he loves his wife, and gets to give her a good speech.  Adaline's cool--she's really in love with William 2.0 (he does have a nice non-flawed life), and Ellis is cool (he even gets the girl when she begins to age again thanks to the contrivance).  Argggh.  

There's a couple of nice scenes--I like Adaline going through album after album of her cocker spaniels.  I'd think she'd get a little jaded after 30 of them, but what do I know, I'm a cat person.

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