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Creation of Synthetic Life


M. Leary
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Well this has just exploded all over the internet, with just cause.

The gist of it is that a genome was created synthetically, then placed back into living cells. This synthetic cell then proceeded to reduplicate itself biologically.

Sure, it requires existing organic life for this process to occur, but it represents a massive breakthrough in terms of what we can now do technologically with the results of gene sequencing.

Edited by M. Leary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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You'd think the scientists had never seen a horror or sci-fi movie before, otherwise they'd know that this is how it all begins... *cue ominous music*

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
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You'd think the scientists had never seen a horror or sci-fi movie before, otherwise they'd know that this is how it all begins... *cue ominous music*

Right now, somewhere in a petri dish there lies a robot cell. I bet if you look through a microscope there is a little red light blinking where the cell eye should be.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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Link to NPR's Radio Lab podcast about "Famous Tumors." The last story in the hour is about a woman whose tumor revolutionized a lot of modern medicine.

Are they talking about the HeLa cell line? If so, there is a great book out on her story, along with musings on the ethics of cell lines in general. I deal with the practical ethical concerns posed by cell lines pretty often, and it is always stunning to see that even the government agencies tasked with providing ethical guidance for these emerging forms of data collection are still at a bit at a loss in terms of how to deal with them. Theories of personalized health care based on genome databases are even creepier. Bothered by Facebook privacy issues? It gets geometrically worse than that.

Edited by M. Leary

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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Vatican calls synthetic cell creation 'interesting'

Rome, Italy (CNN) -- The Vatican had praise Saturday for this week's announcement that scientists had created the world's first synthetic cell, calling it an "interesting result" that could help cure disease.

In an article Saturday, the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano called it "important research" and "the work of high-quality genetic engineering." But it said the scientists who created the cell had not created life, just "replaced one of its motors."

The response may appear to mark a turn for the Vatican, but in fact the church does not officially oppose genetic engineering as long as the science avoids embryonic stem cells, cloning or anything else that fiddles too much with the re-creation of human life. . . .

CNN, May 22

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Vatican calls synthetic cell creation 'interesting'

Rome, Italy (CNN) -- The Vatican had praise Saturday for this week's announcement that scientists had created the world's first synthetic cell, calling it an "interesting result" that could help cure disease.

In an article Saturday, the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano called it "important research" and "the work of high-quality genetic engineering." But it said the scientists who created the cell had not created life, just "replaced one of its motors."

The response may appear to mark a turn for the Vatican, but in fact the church does not officially oppose genetic engineering as long as the science avoids embryonic stem cells, cloning or anything else that fiddles too much with the re-creation of human life. . . .

CNN, May 22

This makes no sense.

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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