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2001: A Space Odyssey

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2001: A False Flag Odyssey

I'm not sure that I buy a lot that is in this essay, but I will say that the author of this break down of the symbolism of 2001 sure has put a lot of time into it, and it makes for an interesting read.

It's way off-base insofar as it reads Kubrick's actual intentions. Kubrick's intentions with 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY are not some nebulous, ambiguous void; despite his dislike for interpreting his own work, he nevertheless did enough of that in interviews and conversations that his ideas regarding 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY are available to any curious reader, provided said reader is not afraid of a little research.

Of course, Kubrick designed 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY in such a way that a singular interpretation would never cover all the bases, and that it could support different readings. But nevertheless, I'm always inclined to react against interpretations of his work that treat them as puzzles to be solved, using minutae as the keys to reading the film (a good deal of scholarship surrounding THE SHINING and EYES WIDE SHUT has made far too much of far too little).

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Good heavens, yes. If a sizable percentage of the claims about references made in 2001 to classic myth, general history, and philosophy are true, then Kubrick was the smartest man or most educated that has ever lived.

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Film School Rejects imagines how the 2001 trailer might look if it were made today.

Unfortunately, they're off the mark. There are way too few Inception-style blares.

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I think their point is that's how the trailer would look today, not how it should look.

But that trailer is about as far off what 2001 really is as that trailer that makes Shining into a romantic comedy.

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A 70mm print of this film is playing at the Cinerama theatre in Seattle three times, I think, this month, and I'm giving some thought to going. (Saturday September 21 would probably be my best bet.) Anyone want to join me there, tempt me with your presence, etc.? (Maybe I should start an A&F Meet-up thread?)

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Richard Brody @ New Yorker:

The New York Philharmonic’s live performance last Friday night of the music to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey”—played in sync to the movie projected on a screen suspended over the orchestra—proved to be surprisingly revelatory. Any shift of context has a way of refocussing attention. I’m reminded of the delightful shock of first seeing a movie on VHS, which turned out to be very different from watching a movie broadcast on television, because it offered the possibility of manipulation: freeze-frame, slow motion, fast-forward, and rewind. So it was on Friday: Kubrick’s movie, which I hadn’t seen since college and always recalled with slight derision for its dated paranoid bombast, came to immediate life, as if it were a painting stripped of darkened varnish and rendered contemporary again. It was the music that effected this change, starting with the excerpt from Ligeti’s “Atmosphères.” Employed as an overture, it immediately sets a very high bar for the artistic originality required for the movie not to wither and shrink from the screen in full public view. . . .

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The Movie That Influenced Kubrick’s 2001  .  Which is of course further proof.

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Which is of course further proof.

 

Only 1 in stock! Act now!

 

 

 

 

I bought one for a friend who moved to Canada awhile back.  It's fun.

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The British Film Institute cut together this trailer for their November re-release of 2001.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfF0vxKZRhc

 

Don't know why, but for some reason my favorite image from this particular trailer comes at the 1:05 mark, when the kettle drum is struck for the second time during Thus Spake Zarathustra.  It may be the most dramatic moment in the history of cinema for retro furniture.

 

2001bfi_zpsb8627a34.jpg

Edited by John Drew

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Last year I caught a showing of this film at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica. All I can say is this film is handmade for the big screen, and whereas parts of it seemed dated to me when first watching it in a home environment, the big screen version in a dark theater, with a real sound system, was engrossing and magnificent, and felt shockingly fresh and current. Can't even imagine what it must have been like to witness this film when it first came out in 1968. I don't experience that kind of cinematic magic and wonder very often. 

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Last year I caught a showing of this film at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica.

 

They show it several times a year, but there is the possibility we were at the same showing.  I've often wondered how many times my path may have unknowingly crossed paths at the movies with other A&Fer's.

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