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Peter T Chattaway

Queen of the Desert

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Link to our thread on Lawrence of Arabia (1962), in which Faisal was played by Alec Guinness.

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Werner Herzog Wants to Crown Naomi Watts Queen of the Desert
If he’d simply made Aguirre: The Wrath of God and called it quits ... dayenu. But thankfully, even at 68, Werner Herzog is still at it: Vulture has learned that Herzog’s written a new drama called Queen of the Desert and is in serious discussions with Naomi Watts about starring.
At the center of Queen is Gertrude Bell, a real-life British woman who was alternately a traveler, writer, archaeologist, explorer, cartographer, and political attaché for the British Empire at the dawn of the twentieth century. While only a commoner herself, Bell was nonetheless a kingmaker, helping found the modern states of Iraq and Jordan and installing their first rulers, King Abdullah and King Faisal. . . .
Vulture, New York, February 3


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Ridley Scott is still talking about making his version of this story, as he does the publicity rounds for Prometheus. But Deadline.com reports that the Herzog version is still in play, too, with shooting expected to begin in the fall.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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You know, when I hear rumblings of actors taking on roles that have already been performed in great, iconic performances... like Peter O'Toole's in Lawrence of Arabia...I sometimes wish the new project would go away. I *like* the fact that it's O'Toole's Lawrence I see in my mind when I read about about him.

But now we have Robert Pattinson, and, well, who won't be eager to close the book on O'Toole once we get a glimpse of Pattinson's Lawrence?

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Hmmm. The last time a major actor played Lawrence of Arabia, it was Ralph Fiennes in A Dangerous Man: Lawrence after Arabia (1992). And, hmmm, Ralph Fiennes actually *killed* Robert Pattinson at the end of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, didn't he?

Let the mash-ups begin.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Naomi Watts says the movie may be on hold.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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‘Homeland’s Damian Lewis To Star With Nicole Kidman In ‘Queen Of The Desert’

EXCLUSIVE: Damian Lewis, who has won Golden Globes and Emmys for his work as POW-turned-terrorist Nicolas Brody in Showtime’s Homeland, is near a deal to star opposite Nicole Kidman in director Werner Herzog’s Queen Of The Desert. The UK-born Lewis won’t have to hide his homegrown accent for the feature: He will play Lt. Col. Charles Doughty-Wylie, an unhappily married English war hero who engages in a turbulent affair with Gertrude Bell (Kidman), with whom he exchanged love letters with from 1913-1915 until he was killed in active duty at Gallipoli. Production is scheduled to begin in December. . . .

Deadline.com, October 21

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Looks like I forgot to link to my earlier blog post about James Franco's involvement.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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David Rooney @ The Hollywood Reporter:

 

Werner Herzog's first narrative feature in six years, Queen of the Desert, has no scarcity of the quixotic German auteur's key themes. Tracing the life of British explorer Gertrude Bell, whose unique understanding of Bedouin cultures helped reshape the Arab world in the early 1900s, this is the story of a woman penetrating the boundaries of nature as a refuge from the constricting conventions of society, the rigidity of colonialism and the cruelties of the human heart. Like so many Herzogian protagonists, she loses herself in a landscape of solitude that mirrors her state of mind. So why are all those tired camels onscreen not the only ones groaning?

 

Mainly it's because despite the director's frequently stated mission to liberate the poetry in his material by excavating what he has described as "ecstatic truth," this is a literal, rather flat epic that keeps telling us in voiceovers of its spiritual dimension, without actually generating much evidence of it. The brief but significant appearances of Robert Pattinson as T.E. Lawrence aside, the film seems less likely to draw comparison to David Lean's classic foray into the desert sands than it is to a dated breed of 1980s romantic bio-drama, begging to be redubbed Out of Arabia.

 

Trekking across dunes, salt-crusted planes and rocky terrain for much of the duration, Nicole Kidman shows no sign of ever having spent an hour in the sun or gone a day without a good moisturizer. But she carries the film more than competently, even if she never quite sheds her movie-star baggage. . . .

 

Werner Herzog discusses shooting his first-ever "erotic scene".


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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My dismissive description: Lawrence of Arabia on estrogen. (And T. E. Lawrence is part of the film.)

Just about everyone I heard talking about this at the festival hated it. I found it a bit "meh". It goes the big sweeping epic route--desert vistas, love story, swelling score, great costumes. But the story is probably spread a bit thin trying to cover such a broad time span. It was a bit hard to keep track of all the places she was going and people she was meeting.


A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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I think this film is supposed to be taking place in Arabia, but they obviously filmed it in Morocco. At the 1:35 mark, you can even see the exact same hill with a building on top that I visited two and a half years ago (a picture of which is at the top of my Facebook page; and come to that, my Facebook profile picture was taken at the top of that hill, too).

 


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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