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I've been keeping an eye on this one; the reviews I've seen have been very good indeed (some have compared it to Scott Pilgrim vs. the World if Scott's main influences were French New Wave. In my book, that's a plus).

BTW, the director is Richard Ayoade, a.k.a. Moss from The I.T. Crowd.

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  • 4 months later...

Rather liked this film, though I wasn't surprised to see that the only two names I recognized in the "Thank You" credits were Michael Cera and Harmony Korine!

Interestingly, it is a film set in Wales that begins with a title card that starts, "Dear Americans..." Since I was sitting in a Canadian theatre among fellow Canadians, I wasn't quite sure what to make of that.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 month later...

Wow. What a great surprise. Lots of Ashby, Godard, a crucial Melville reference.

The only thing I had an issue with at first is with the voiceover. It is hysterical and wise in its own way. But given its cadence, I kept envisioning: Moss.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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It really isn't. As it turns out, Moss is a genius. I can't think of a debut feature I have liked so much for a few years.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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I posted a quick review here. This seems to be on my top ten for the year so far.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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I posted a quick review here. This seems to be on my top ten for the year so far.

I seemed to have missed whatever brief window this movie had in Alabama. I guess I'll have to wait for the DVD. But your review guarantees (if it weren't already a sure thing) that I'll be checking it out ASAP.

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Like I said, I may be out to lunch. But I was really drawn into it. Every now and then a film like this comes along that I have a strong reaction to, but no one else really does (e.g. Secret Lives of Dentists, Mad Max). So I apologize in advance if you find it a waste of time.

"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

I finally got to see this tonight. I loved it. Some of the parallelism between the boy and his father seemed a little forced, and the ending might have gotten a bit too close to a stereotypical (albeit wonderfully rendered) "happy ending," but on the whole I found myself grinning all the way through it--and laughing out loud several times. There were a couple of film-gags (like a certain fade-out about a third of the way into the movie--or perhaps halfway) that I found particularly funny, for whatever reason.

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  • 1 month later...

I liked the teen angst parts a lot more than the parental angst parts, but that could be because I'm closer to that stage of life. I liked the movie quite a bit overall, although I was expecting more of a comedy because I only know Ayoade from his work on The IT Crowd. I suppose that's not the movie's fault, though.

Paddy Considine's hair is one of the most frightening things I've seen in a movie this year.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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  • 2 months later...

This is one of those rare films where I didn't know where I arrived the final scene thinking "This scene is going to determine whether I cheer or grumble." Really... everything depended on how they resolved this story.

I cheered. Great ending.

And for those who enjoyed it... I think you'll enjoy this too.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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  • 2 months later...

Watching it now. This makes the THIRD wildly original film I've seen this weekend. Why was I under the impression that this movie had been considered somewhat of a disappointment? Maybe I tracked box-office reports and confused those with critical assessments of the film.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Watching it now. This makes the THIRD wildly original film I've seen this weekend. Why was I under the impression that this movie had been considered somewhat of a disappointment? Maybe I tracked box-office reports and confused those with critical assessments of the film.

I think it did have some marketing issues, so far as it had marketing at all. Personally, since it came from Richard Ayoade, of The IT Crowd, I was expecting it to be a straightforward comedy, and it's really something different from that. It has humorous moments, but it genuinely cares about its characters in ways a typical comedy wouldn't, which dampens the humor, although it makes it deeper in other ways.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

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Full disclosure: The film lost me a bit in the last third, right after I posted. But I've had some distractions in the past half hour -- some self-imposed, some not.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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