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Darryl A. Armstrong

Coverage of the 2011 A&F Top 100

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Filmsweep Reaction. Even used FB to promote it!

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Soma (from Brazil, this is the link to the translated page).

A blog (Ryan H.).

A blog (Christian Hamaker).

A blog (NBooth).

A blog.

A blog.

ETA:

The Christian Post.

Mundo Gospel (this is the link to the translated page).

Edited by Darryl A. Armstrong

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Wow. They took it very seriously, even bringing quotes from John Piper into their consideration of it.

Hm.

Our Top 25 Horror Films list says:

This year's pick was Horror films

but the Christian Post says:

including a biannual special interest list chronicling the Top 25 Horror Movies

Do they know something I don't know?

As I've mentioned, I think doing Top 25 lists more often than annually would be a great idea. Quarterly would be awesome. But biannually would be better than annually.

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Is that Greg's post in #2 above? Sounds like a press release. Anyway, that post says the t100 will be done every two years, with a genre specific list done every year.

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BTW, I see the Christian Post piece quotes a lot from Jeff's piece, and it uses my piece quite a bit too -- but mostly just mines my piece for info without quoting me or mentioning my piece until the very end. Strange.

I also notice that in paraphrasing me, they get a couple things wrong:

Stanley Kubrick, Alfred Hitchcock, and Orson Welles were new to the list with “Paths of Glory,” “Vertigo,” and “Touch of Evil,”

Uh, no. All I said was that those directors were now represented by those new films. I never said the directors themselves were new to the list -- they aren't, unless you mean only that we didn't have them last year. (We certainly had Kubrick and Welles before. Don't remember if we ever had any Hitchcock, though I know we didn't last year.)

Twice as many English-language films also made the cut

I didn't say our total count of English-language films had doubled. I didn't even try to do a complete count of all English films in this year's list compared to last year's (which would be hard to do since some are bilingual or, uh, nonlingual).

What I did was count the English films among incoming and outgoing films, and I found that we gained more than twice as many English films as we lost. But in principle, that could be true even if we picked up only two or three English films and lost one (though the facts are a bit more notable than that).

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BTW, I see the Christian Post piece quotes a lot from Jeff's piece, and it uses my piece quite a bit too -- but mostly just mines my piece for info without quoting me or mentioning my piece until the very end. Strange.

Yeah, I thought that was really strange too. At first I thought they were relying on last year's intro, and that they'd missed yours. Hmmm....

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Well, although the article is appreciated, I noticed a friend who writes for Moviefone was quoted in it, so I tried to track down her post. I can't say for certain, but I think the article author quoted her post on last year's A&F 100. That's the only A&F-related post of hers I could find at Moviefone, via a Google search, FWIW. I'm not sure she still writes for the site, from what I can see there. (EDIT: Yeah, the quote comes from this article from last year.)

On the front page of Movie City News right now!

Is it worth adding a link within SDG's Top 100 intro to the Top 25 Horror films list? I can see a link to Jeffrey's post on the Top 25 in the upper left of Image's page, but the link isn't embedded within the Top 100 intro. I think it would be cool, given the MCN exposure, if we could highlight the smaller list within the intro for the larger list.

Just a thought.

Edited by Christian

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Well, although the article is appreciated, I noticed a friend who writes for Moviefone was quoted in it, so I tried to track down her post. I can't say for certain, but I think the article author quoted her post on last year's A&F 100. That's the A&F-related only post of hers I could find at Moviefone, via a Google search, FWIW. I'm not sure she still writes for the site, from what I can see there.

On the front page of Movie City News right now!

Is it worth adding a link within SDG's Top 100 intro to the Top 25 Horror films list? I can see a link to Jeffrey's post on the Top 25 in the upper left of Image's page, but the link isn't embedded within the Top 100 intro. I think it would be cool, given the MCN exposure, if we could highlight the smaller list within the intro for the larger list.

Just a thought.

Great idea, Christian. We'll do that.

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Note the headline: Now Christianity Today is publishing the "Most Redeeminging List". Are those movies even more redeeming than the Most Redeeming?

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And in this post we're like a tack-on in the last sentence.

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Note the headline: Now Christianity Today is publishing the "Most Redeeminging List". Are those movies even more redeeming than the Most Redeeming?

Perhaps we should jump way ahead now and create "The Most Redeemalingadingdong List". Anything beyond that would be silly.

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Oh, how I eagerly await the day that this page is no longer blank. :P Arts&Faith contributes to the internet in so many diverse yet excellent ways.

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The Christian Century:

I'm not a fan of horror films of any kind, but Overstreet's reluctance to condemn a whole genre is right on. Horror aside, I try to avoid violent movies--but I weigh this concern against how good I expect a film to be. As Martin Sheen (an outspoken pacifist who's starred in some very good violent movies) puts it in The West Wing, the problem isn't that some movies are too violent, "it's that they suck. They're terrible." I think a lot of better, more challenging films could be just as effective with a bit less explicit violence, but I take Overstreet's point: "explicit" and "gratuitous" aren't synonyms.

This argument of Overstreet's, however, is troubling. In response to the question "shouldn't good Christians avoid depictions of such violence and depravity?" he offers this:

Think about it. What is the central image of Christian faith?

The cross. The blameless Son of God--a truly perfect organism--was nailed to that wooden plank and raised up, naked and bleeding, for the amusement of his scornful community.

What could be more horrific?

We cringe at the thought of our capacity for evil. And that discomfort is useful. It's a distress call. We're compelled to seek a cure for our disease, to seek the reconciliation of a dismembered world.

Hmm. The idea that Christianity's central image is a gruesome crucifixion scene--and that this has positive effects--isn't exactly a consensus position. Margaret Miles argues in the Century that the faith's original symbol wasn't a cross at all. Sarah Sentilles connects the common emphasis on the crucifixion's bloody details with support for torture (though I don't buy how she applies this to poll data). And that's just recently: tension between gory crucifixes and more cerebral depictions--to say nothing of different atonement theologies--has of course existed for centuries.

A "hmmmm" right back at him. I'm not certain I think the cross is the "ideal" central image for Christian faith. I haven't really thought about it. An empty tomb might speak more of hope and victory. But how many people do you see wearing open tombs around their necks, or placing open tombs atop their church steeples?

I'll be very interested if he ever offers an alternative "central image."

Still, I'm glad to see The Christian Century noticing A&F. The first comment is nice to see.

Edited by Overstreet

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