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Darryl A. Armstrong

Coverage of the 2011 A&F Top 100

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A blog: "Something’s seriously wrong with this list."

In other words, "This large group of people does not agree with me on one particular film, so I'm giving it a thumbs' down."


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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In other words, "This large group of people does not agree with me on one particular film, so I'm giving it a thumbs' down."

Any publicity is good publicity. Right? :P


"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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Ran across this today by accident. I don't remember seeing it before.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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The Washington Times:

7. “The Passion of Joan of Arc” (1928) — Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent, fascinating and forbidding masterpiece, tells the story of Joan of Arc, a 15th-century French peasant girl who hears voices telling her to lead a mission to throw out the English. Joan, played by Renee Falconetti, faces inquisition, torture and ultimately the stake. Her performance is one of the finest in cinema history. The film is one of the last great silent pictures before the talkies took over. It is the top-ranked film on the Arts and Faith 2011 list.


"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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The Washington Times:

7. “The Passion of Joan of Arc” (1928) — Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent, fascinating and forbidding masterpiece, tells the story of Joan of Arc, a 15th-century French peasant girl who hears voices telling her to lead a mission to throw out the English. Joan, played by Renee Falconetti, faces inquisition, torture and ultimately the stake. Her performance is one of the finest in cinema history. The film is one of the last great silent pictures before the talkies took over. It is the top-ranked film on the Arts and Faith 2011 list.

Also:

5. “The Gospel According to Matthew” (1964) — Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini retells the story of Jesus from the Nativity to the Resurrection based on Matthew’s Gospel. Most of the actor’s were nonprofessionals but the film enjoyed good reviews and is ranked No. 7 in the Arts and Faith’s Top 100 Films.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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From Gray Matters: Navigating the Space Between Legalism and Liberty by Brett McCracken, pg. 148:

... The 2011 Arts and Faith Top 100 Films list is a good barometer of an increasing sophistication in the way Christians value and engage cinema.  The list, voted on by sixty-five professional film writers and lecturers, lifelong cinephiles, seminary students, and ordinary movie fans, celebrates films with overt religious themes (Jesus of Montreal, The Apostle, A Man for All Seasons) but also films with "sublime expression of humane values" (Tokyo Story, Bicycle Thieves), "populist favorites" (It's a Wonderful Life), and "dreamy art-house tone poems" (Wings of Desire).  It's telling that the list is made up of nearly two-thirds foreign language films with only a handful of films from the last ten years.  Christians are increasingly exploring the history and aesthetic accomplishments of cinema, finding in secular and world cinema great truth and beauty with incredible relevance to the life of faith.

McCracken, by the way, writes this right after summing up Ted Baehr's Movieguide's approach to film.  He is using Arts & Faith as a contrast to Baehr.

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I noticed on Steven's write up at Image ( https://imagejournal.org/2011/02/14/reading-the-eternities-the-2011-arts-faith-top-100-films/   ) that 65 was called the new high, but wasn't there over a 100 (or 200) for one of the lists that Alan did (2005 or 6?) I only remember that because I thought it was a big deal that he sent out mass mailers to people not in A&F and I seem to recall getting a personal plea from him to vote because he was at 198 or something and wanted to hit an even 200. Does anyone else remember this, or am I hallucinating?

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