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Six-Day Creation


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Many of those you list also believed in a six day creation.  Is that required too?  I'd also include in your list Mohammed.  Does that add to your position?

I believe what the Bible states. Six days. But that depends on what you mean by "day". In my father's "day" (not 24 hours), that might have meant something different. And I do think understanding Gen 1 as poetry may be valid -- but that doesn't mean it's a fib, just that it's a different style of writing with different (but not wide-open) rules for interpretation.

My understanding is that even the literal meaning of the Hebrew there can be taken to mean "age" or "eon" -- which makes sense, especially since the sun (which has something to do with that 24-hour period and evenings and mornings and such) wasn't around for all six days.

Having a view of scripture that agrees with scripture is required, I'd say -- it's all God-breathed, etc.

Ah, and they accuse us liberals of trying to finesse scripture. Day is day. Can it be read other ways? Yeah, but the basic reading is day.

I affirm Genesis 1 as true. I don't accept it as factual. There's a difference.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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Yom can be used in a variety of ways, but just as our common use of day is a 24-hour period and is basically understood as such unless it obviously doesn't fit or unless it plays into a figure of speech. Also keep in mind that the way it is stated in Gen. 1 is "And it was evening and it was morning Day 1... And it was evening and it was morning the second day..." The intent of the word in Gen. 1 certainly seems to be simple. Occam's razor may apply, even if it complicates things.

A foreign movie can't be stupid.

-from the film
Armin

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: I agree with you that generally the most straightforward interpretation is the best

Its a nice handy rule, but I'm not sure it fits as easily as we all wish it did. The most obvious rendering of a given text, may be very different in a culture from 3000 years ago, in another part of the world - particularly when you start takin into account that the translation of any given word is not a perfect fit etc.

As George Caird said if someone says "I'm mad about my flat", we need to know a bit more to know whether he is an american who is angry about a puncture, or a briton who is very enthusiastic about his apartment.

Also been reading a bit of Tom Wright this week, and he talks about as well as the literal non-literal distinction we also need to consider whether the thing being referred to literally or metaphorically is concrete or abstract. (A bit of a tangent but I found it interesting)

Matt

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I have nothing more to add on the discussion of the biblical narrative, but I do have a few thoughts about the science of this debate. Hopefully, this post will be more than semi-coherent, as I'm still working out some of these ideas for myself. As a college student, I found evolutionary teaching to be very threatening, feeling that I had to cling tenaciously to a literal 6-day creation, a young earth, and all of the other stuff that Gish, Morris, and company were teaching.

Only more recently have I come to believe that it's a deeply flawed approach to try and impress modernistic, scientific standards on a premodern, non-scientific narrative. Now it seems to me that, rather than old earth/young earth or creation vs. evolution, the real 21st Century contention is between a nihilistic and atheistic worldview vs. one in which a loving Creator/Savior is working behind (and in) the scenes. Scientific thinking is constantly in a state of flux, too much so for me to want to put all of the eggs in one theoretical basket. That being said, I do think those who believe in a young earth and literalistic reading of the Genesis account have much more of an uphill battle, in attempting to explain the fossil record, astronomy, and physics with a vocabulary that doesn't include the words 'hundreds of millions of years ago.'

To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

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Hugh Ross has been a big influence in my thinking here (along with Bill Dembski). Ross is an old-earth proponent, and he says when people ask him "Don't you believe in the Biblical account of creation?" he responds, "Which one?" He says there are many accounts of creation in the Bible, and taken together they represent an artful, comprehensive account; taken separately, they are incomplete and misunderstood.

Quoting from the FAQ Section:

Now...I'm not a Hebrew exegete.  But I will tell you that two of the best-known exegetes of the Old Testament in the American evangelical community are Gleason Archer at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Walter Kaiser at Gordon Conwell. Walter Kaiser and Gleason Archer are respected in the entire United States as being faithful expositors of the Old Testament. Both of them know eight to ten Old Testament languages, and they both have spent their entire lives in Hebrew exegesis.  Both of them believe the days of Genesis are...vast, unspecified periods of time, and are in no way required to be literal twenty-four hour days.

Another article on what the Bible says in various places about the Big Bang.

"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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