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6 minutes ago, Anders said:

Isn't that what the new American Gods are? The goddess Media in particular, but also gods of the internet and technology and the stock market.

Ah.  You're right.  It's been too long since I've read it, probably shouldn't have commented without checking Wikipedia first.  That is one of the main conflicts of the book isn't it, between the old gods and the new?

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I imagined Wednesday as quite a bit older, but other than that, I'd say this looks like it's keeping right in the spirit and atmosphere of the book.

 

Hm. On looking at the IMDB page, it looks like Laura and Lyesmith are going to have much bigger roles; I wonder what other changes will be made. It still looks really good.

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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[May not be available in Canada]

EDIT:  "The idea of this show is that everybody worships something."

Oh, man. This is going to be so--if I can get David Darkian for a second--talkaboutable. 

Edited by NBooth
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NBooth wrote:
: [May not be available in Canada]

It *is* available. But I don't have enough time/interest for this hour-long video right now. :)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Jeremy Davies is playing Jesus.

The picture at my blog post is of Davies playing Charles Manson in Helter Skelter (2004). He was also on Lost for a few seasons (along with Henry Ian Cusick, who played Jesus in The Gospel of John), and he won an Emmy for a guest stint on Justified. And some people might recognize him from Saving Private Ryan (1998), where he played the more book-ish member of the American squad. I still think of him as the guy who sleeps with his mom in David O. Russell's Spanking the Monkey (1994), though; that was one of the first film reviews I had to assign after I became entertainment editor at The Campus Times.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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So, yeah, that scene with Bilquis is definitely in the pilot. Is it just me or do HBO, Starz, and Cinemax have their own NC-17 style?

There's a lot to like here. Gaiman gave a a video message to SXSW saying he loved the adaptation, and Fuller and Greene said they've messed with timeline a little and tried to bulk up female presences. Pablo Schrieber and Betty Gilpin kinda steal the pilot, and I'm wondering if Shadow is going to become overshadowed by the huge cast of more colorful supporting characters.

Still thinking about: they moved the funeral home scene to a (I think Roman Catholic) Church. I suppose it is understandable for a TV audience to underline themes, but it seemed wrong for the characters and was the one place the first episode made me scratchy. 

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On 9/3/2016 at 9:23 PM, Peter T Chattaway said:

Jeremy Davies is playing Jesus.

The picture at my blog post is of Davies playing Charles Manson in Helter Skelter (2004). He was also on Lost for a few seasons (along with Henry Ian Cusick, who played Jesus in The Gospel of John), and he won an Emmy for a guest stint on Justified. And some people might recognize him from Saving Private Ryan (1998), where he played the more book-ish member of the American squad. I still think of him as the guy who sleeps with his mom in David O. Russell's Spanking the Monkey (1994), though; that was one of the first film reviews I had to assign after I became entertainment editor at The Campus Times.

He's currently on Sleepy Hollow, playing an anti-Christ-like character who's raising the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. I trust our heroes, who are operating out of Washington, D.C., this season, will defeat him.

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

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The first episode is up on Amazon with a Starz subscription. I don't have much to say so far, except that--stylistically--this show feels very much like a continuation of Hannibal; there were several moments that made me gasp in exactly the same way that the older show did at its best.

The music is similarly of-a-piece with Hannibal, but it's cut with a very distinct homage to Badalamenti's work on Twin Peaks. 

Edited by NBooth
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[1] This thread should really be in TV.

[2] I've watched the first episode twice now and I kind of love it. If they keep with how events unfold in the novel, they've planted a few nice bits of foreshadowing here for those with eyes to see.

[3] Inspired by Joel Mayward, I did a spoiler-ish tweetstorm about the small-town stuff in the novel. It starts here. [I liked the book a lot. I found Shadow a bit, um, shadowy and I wasn't too happy with the plot resolution. But there's lots to like in the novel]

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Being completely unfamiliar with the novel and with Bryan Fuller's earlier work, I basically came away from the first episode... unsatisfied. I couldn't have cared less about the barfight, for example, because I simply didn't know these characters well enough to feel invested in them yet. Darn it, when I see a show called "American Gods", I want more of the actual *gods*, y'know? But they haven't even announced themselves as such, yet. Instead we're following this Shadow Moon character, whoever *he's* supposed to be.

I did like the prologue, though.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Delayed reaction here, but I was struck by how the third episode, on the one hand, included a scene in which Mr Wednesday says there is a different Jesus for every ethnic group, and on the other hand, it had a prologue in which a modern-day Egyptian woman meets an ancient Egyptian god who is completely different from her ethnically.

(Complicating matters even more is that the woman in question is officially Muslim, but the god reminds her that she heard stories about the ancient Egyptian gods when she was young. This gets me wondering, will American Gods ever depict Allah? Or -- since Jesus is part of the picture -- will it ever depict God the Father? The Jewish God, even?)

I have never read the novel, so I don't know to what degree it might shed light on any of these questions.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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16 hours ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

 

I have never read the novel, so I don't know to what degree it might shed light on any of these questions.

I have read the novel and have no idea if it might shed light on any of these questions.

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So apparently there are at least *five* different Jesuses in upcoming episodes (starting with tomorrow's) -- and they're not just categorized by ethnicity (or immigration group). In addition to White Jesus, Mexican Jesus, Black Jesus and Asian Jesus, there's a Hippie Jesus as well.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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*** Mild spoilers for the first six episodes. ***

If I were a more fair and balanced person, I'd be paying significant attention to the entire cast of characters. But of course the main reason I'm watching this show (whereas I watch very few TV shows in general) is because I'm mainly interested in the show's treatment of Jesus.

So, to recap:

-- Episode 3 has a scene in which Mr Wednesday talks about the multiple Jesuses.

-- Episode 4 has a flashback in which Laura Moon talks about growing up Catholic and she says she came to believe that Jesus wasn't real.

-- Episode 6 begins with Mexican Jesus helping Mexicans across the Rio Grande and being shot in the heart (sacred heart imagery as the blood stain spreads across his shirt!) by an American with "Thy Kingdom Come" engraved on his gun. Later, Mad Sweeney tells Laura that Jesus Christ is a "friend" of his.

The 6th episode also features a scene in which Laura and Salim talk about praying to "God" -- not "a god" -- for things. This raises the question of where the transcendent monotheistic God stands in relation to all these smaller, personal deities within the universe of this film. It's complicated enough as it is that Jesus himself is one of these smaller, personal deities (indeed, he is *multiple* smaller, personal deities!), and it is not clear to me at all whether the Jesuses of this show are going to be related in any way to the historical Jesus (or if, a la Laura's comment, the series is going to take the view that Jesus never existed historically and is nothing but a mythical character, just like all these other gods).

Incidentally, regarding how the 3rd episode featured an Egyptian woman who looked Middle Eastern and an Egyptian god who didn't, Nature reported the other day on a DNA analysis of Egyptian mummies that showed that "ancient Egyptians shared little DNA with modern sub-Saharan Africans. Instead, their closest relatives were people living during the Neolithic and Bronze ages in an area known as the Levant. Strikingly, the mummies were more closely related to ancient Europeans and Anatolians than to modern Egyptians."

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Many hieroglyphics show white, brown, and black skinned Egyptians. 

As for Jesus the only mention of him in the novel is a passing reference to a man walking down the road. "I saw Jesus walking down the highway" or something like that. That's it. Jesus doesn't get any other mention. Which is why I too am interested in the show's conception. It's very sociologically accurate, all cultures have a different conception of Jesus and often he wears their own skin and cares deeply about things that matter to them. Since the stories central idea is that belief and worship -creates- gods different Jesus' makes total sense. The universe which the novel exists in would probably acknowledge a historical person named Jesus existing but his godhood as a myth people came to believe and create multiple Jesus gods out of. 

As for God..well, if the stories mechanics are at work He exists. I imagine he's one of the more powerful ones as belief and worship equal power in the American Gods universe. The less belief and worship you have the less powerful you are. Or it could be like the multiple Jesus', different versions of God for every different person or culture who believes in Him (or Her!). As the saying goes we tend to make God in our image. That would certainly end up in the same result in the shows universe. 

God exists in other Gaiman stories that explore like the fall of Lucifer and stuff and Gaiman probably considers that somewhat similar in this shows or novels universe.

"The truth is you're the weak, and I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin Ringo, I'm tryin real hard to be the shepherd." Pulp Fiction

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