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Perhaps I can be an extra in one of those Batman movies that I do not enjoy!

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http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11095/1137149-348.stm

"Ye Darke Night Riseth"-- that's the working title, I believe-- is trading in the City of Big Shoulders for another locale.

Tom Hardy is pretty awesome. I wish he was playing that naked convict pugilist guy in this one.


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How can you not enjoy a Batman movie.

How can you not enjoy a Batman movie, I say again.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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How can you not enjoy a Batman movie.

How can you not enjoy a Batman movie, I say again.

Really?? Oh man, I just watched the first Batman (Burton, Keaton) with my boys. So disappointing! Oh man, so very disappointing. Wish I would have introduced them to the Batman saga differently. Oh well, I can still hope that by watching all of the Batman movies they will become discerning film watchers.


...the kind of film criticism we do. We are talking about life, and more than that the possibility of abundant life." -M.Leary

"Dad, how does she move in mysterious ways?"" -- Jude (my 5-year-old, after listening to Mysterious Ways)

[once upon a time known here as asher]

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Thom said:

:Really?? Oh man, I just watched the first Batman (Burton, Keaton) with my boys. So disappointing! Oh man, so very disappointing.

I've heard many people say something similar about that movie. Ironically I remember it being a huge hit when it was released.

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How can you not enjoy a Batman movie.

How can you not enjoy a Batman movie, I say again.

Really?? Oh man, I just watched the first Batman (Burton, Keaton) with my boys. So disappointing! Oh man, so very disappointing.

Isn't that a little harsh? True: Keaton is dreadful, and Nicholson is way over the top; but Burton's set design is enthralling, Elfman's score is great, and I actually like the origin twist towards the end.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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How can you not enjoy a Batman movie.

How can you not enjoy a Batman movie, I say again.

Really?? Oh man, I just watched the first Batman (Burton, Keaton) with my boys. So disappointing! Oh man, so very disappointing.

Isn't that a little harsh? True: Keaton is dreadful, and Nicholson is way over the top; but Burton's set design is enthralling, Elfman's score is great, and I actually like the origin twist towards the end.

I remember it as being almost like an Arthouse version of Batman. Very stylistic, even to the point of being style over action.

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I don't think I've ever heard a Tim Burton film compared to an Arthouse production before...

I like it, especially if you apply it to some of his other works. Style is a key factor in Burton's most successful films. It's also the biggest problem in his worst films.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Attica wrote:

: I've heard many people say something similar about that movie. Ironically I remember it being a huge hit when it was released.

Yes, it was the first movie to gross $100 million in ten days. It was *huge*. It was also one of the first films to be priced-to-sell as soon as it came out on video -- and it came out only six months or so after it played in theatres. (This was in 1989. E.T., a 1982 film re-issued in theatres in 1985, came out on video in 1988. Return of the Jedi, a 1983 film re-issued in theatres in 1986, came out on video in 1987 or thenabouts. *That* was how studios handled top-ten-grossing-movies-of-all-time, at the time.)

And yet, despite the film's wild popularity -- and despite the fact that I bought a lot of the tie-ins -- I didn't like it at all. And I didn't like it for the same reason that I bought all the tie-ins: I was an 18-year-old who had just gotten into comic collecting, and I was a big fan of the Batman comics of that era in particular. And the movie was *nothing* like the Batman comics of that era. The disparity was all the more disappointing because Sam Hamm, one of the screenwriters on the movie, had written a brilliant three-part storyline for the comics that reached its climax in Detective Comics #600. So I pretty much blamed the movie's lameness on Tim Burton.

But, y'know, a collector's gotta collect, so.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I've loved Batman for years and I've never cared for any of the movies...except Mask of the Phantasm which was more of an extended episode from The Animated Series. Comics and the the TV shows just tell much more interesting stories than any of the movies. Nolan's films in particular take a lot from the comics but often end up being much worse than the originals he is pulling from.

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Peter T Chattaway said:

And yet, despite the film's wild popularity -- and despite the fact that I bought a lot of the tie-ins -- I didn't like it at all. And I didn't like it for the same reason that I bought all the tie-ins: I was an 18-year-old who had just gotten into comic collecting, and I was a big fan of the Batman comics of that era in particular. And the movie was *nothing* like the Batman comics of that era.

Nope. It wasn't anything like the comics of that era. But by the time the film came out I had pretty much moved out of my comic book stage. I do remember that I liked it at the time. I think that the film was very much a product of the 80's and an end part of an era that was soon to die. It was strange and campy, and it wasn't long into the 90's that I remember the tide turning against it.

But for a year or two it was all of the rave.

I revisited the film several years ago, and I could hardly believe how little of action there was in it for an action film, nevermind one about the Batman. Keaton could barely move in that costume. But I did find that while not really being a good Batman film it did have a unique enough vision that I found it to be interesting enough for its style.

So if I was to look at it through the lense of being a superhero film, then it's a dud. But if I was to look at it through the lense of a studio film which is a different enough vision to almost be an arthouse film about a famous Superhero, then it's a brave film.

Burton, of late, has been criticized for rehashing the same old thing. But ironically, I think that the "same old thing" that he might be rehashing was quite unique and brave for him to make in its time. Batman being one of them. For good or ill he went against what one would expect from the comics and it paid off for him. Mind, many people might have taken to this particular movie because of their affection for the earlier campy T.V. series, instead of the comic books.

Edited by Attica

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Burton, of late, has been criticized for rehashing the same old thing. But ironically, I think that the "same old thing" that he might be rehashing was quite unique and brave for him to make in its time. Batman being one of them. For good or ill he went against what one would expect from the comics and it paid off for him. Mind, many people might have taken to this particular movie because of their affection for the earlier campy T.V. series, instead of the comic books.

Can you image a "quirky" director like Burton being given the reigns of a tent pole superhero franchise now? Genre and heavily stylistic directors, sure. I think Whedon and Nolan in their own ways have done amazing work with superhero franchises. But I get the "arthouse" reference here.

This makes me envision a Wes Anderson Spider-man or even better, Fantastic Four film. I think that would be pretty spectacular.


"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

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Darryl A. Armstrong said:

:Can you image a "quirky" director like Burton being given the reigns of a tent pole superhero franchise now?

Not a chance :) . Mind. Ang Lee's HULK might have had some of this, and it wasn't that long ago. But it bombed, which of course would kill that idea for awhile.

:This makes me envision a Wes Anderson Spider-man or even better, Fantastic Four film. I think that would be pretty spectacular.

Fantastic Four would be interesting. It would probably flop, but at least it could be a well made flop, not like those successful stinkers that were released.

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I remember really liking Burton's Batman at the time... but a revisiting when they released the special editions DVDs a few years back was not so favorable with the film.

The documentaries were quite top notch (I have the film set on blu-ray or all the docs) with the special editions. I even became sympathetic to Schumacher. The four films of that Batman franchise era are really a stellar example of how marketing and toys can overtake a film to insane levels.


"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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