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Peter T Chattaway

Inside Out

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Links to our threads on 'Pixar: The studio, its history and process' (Jun 2009 ff.) as well as the upcoming films Cars 2 (2011), Brave (2012), Monsters University (2013), The Good Dinosaur (2014), Finding Dory (2015) and Dia de los Muertos (in development).

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Exclusive: Tom McCarthy on Pete Docter’s Next Pixar Film – “Amazing” & “Ambitious”
I was able to talk with Tom briefly after the Q & A and I asked him if he’s working on the story with Pete Docter on Pete’s next unannounced Pixar film and he said No. He said he recently visited Pixar to screen Win Win and did spend some time with Docter. Tom went on to say that Pete has some “Amazing” and “Ambitious” ideas and plans for his next Pixar film and he had a “really hard time wrapping his brain around them” because they were really out there. Sounds like it’s progressing nicely!
Pixar Talk, March 22

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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ComingSoon.net reports:

Disney•Pixar announced two new films at the D23 Expo in Anaheim, California today. . . .

The second project, directed by Pete Docter and produced by Jonas Rivera, is described as follows: "From director Pete Docter comes an inventive new film that explores a world that everyone knows, but no one has seen: inside the human mind." It's coming May 30, 2014.

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Docter's picture showed up on IMDB because today's his birthday. I didn't know he is a Pixar character himself.

Don't think it's just that one picture. Docter is one odd looking dude.

In fact, if anything, that picture doesn't show him at his oddest looking.

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Pixar Times:

When Pete Docter first announced the project at the D23 Expo in August, he said the driving force of the film was the question, “What is going on in people’s heads?”. In the interview with Charlie Rose, John Lasseter elaborates on that (the video can be seen here, with the following quote starting at 52:29):

Pete Docter, from Monsters, Inc. and Up, is doing a new film that takes place inside of a girl’s mind and it is about her emotions as characters, and that is unlike anything you’ve ever seen.

So now we know that the character whose thoughts we will be privy to is a girl (if she is a main character she would be another big female protagonist for Pixar!) and her emotions will have roles in the film. It sounds like her emotions will be embodied by fully-realized characters and will help to visually and creatively explain how the mind works through acting out their personalities. Still having a difficult time figuring out how this film will function? You’re not alone, but I continue to be fascinated by the premise.

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The Next Film From The Director Of Up And Monsters Inc. Is Called The Inside Out – At Least For Now

We’ve now heard that the film is on the verge of getting an official title and that title is almost certainly going to be The Inside Out.

That title hasn’t yet been cleared, but it’s the one Pixar want. Barring any problems with getting the name okayed, we can probably expect it to be announced soon.

Incidentally, once my source told me this title, I Googled around to see if I could find any mention of it. I found one.

Seems that the title was used just this week by Stefano Bethlen, Disney’s head of distribution in Italy, when speaking to Primissima.

That’s enough corroboration for me, so there we go. Pete Docter’s next is The Inside Out – at least for now.

Bleeding Cool, December 2

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I was thinking of the Peter Gabriel song. And he's sung in Pixar movies before...

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A few more details from the Disney D23 expo:

 

When a young girl moves to San Francisco, she is unhappy in the Disney-Pixar "Inside Out." We see her emotions Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling), Fear (Bill Hader), Joy (Amy Poehler) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith) in her emotional headquarters. What happens when Joy and Sadness leave and Anger, Disgust and Fear are left in charge? Expect an appearance of the train of thought.

It's starting to sound something like The Phantom Tollbooth.

Edited by Rushmore

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Ed Catmull on The Braintrust:

 

To get a clearer sense of how candor is delivered at Pixar, I want to take you inside a Braintrust meeting. This one followed an early screening of a Pete Docter film, then known as The Untitled Pixar Movie That Takes You Inside the Mind. [it's now called Inside Out, and is scheduled for release in 2015.] As Braintrusts go, this was a crowded one, with about 20 people at the table and 15 more in chairs against the walls. Everyone grabbed plates of food on the way in and, after a little small talk, got down to business.

 

Earlier, before the screening, Pete had described what they'd come up with so far. "What's inside the mind?" he asked his colleagues. "Your emotions--and we've worked really hard to make these characters look the way those emotions feel. We have our main character, an emotion called Joy, who is effervescent. She literally glows when she's excited. Then we have Fear. He thinks of himself as confident and suave, but he's a little raw nerve and tends to freak out. The other characters are Anger, Sadness--her shape is inspired by teardrops--and Disgust, who basically turns up her nose at everything. And all these guys work at what we call Headquarters."

 

That got a laugh, as did many scenes in the 10-minute preview that followed. Everyone agreed that the movie had the potential to be, like Pete's previous film Up, among our most original and affecting. But there seemed to be a consensus that one key scene--an argument between two characters about why certain memories fade while others burn bright forever--was too minor to sufficiently connect audiences to the film's profound ideas.

 

Midway down the table, Brad Bird shifted in his chair. Brad joined Pixar in 2000, after having written and directed The Iron Giant at Warner Bros. His first movie for us was The Incredibles, which opened in 2004. Brad is a born rebel who fights against creative conformity in any guise. So it was no surprise that he was among the first to articulate his worries. "I understand that you want to keep this simple and relatable," he told Pete, "but I think we need something that your audience can get a little more invested in."

 

Andrew Stanton spoke next. Andrew is fond of saying that people need to be wrong as fast as they can. In a battle, if you're faced with two hills and you're unsure which one to attack, he says, the right course of action is to hurry up and choose. If you find out it's the wrong hill, turn around and attack the other one. Now he seemed to be suggesting that Pete and his team had stormed the wrong hill. "I think you need to spend more time settling on the rules of your imagined world," he said.

 

Every Pixar movie has its own rules that viewers have to accept, understand, and enjoy understanding. The voices of the toys in the Toy Story films, for example, are never audible to humans. The rats in Ratatouille walk on four paws, like normal vermin, except for Remy, our star, whose upright posture sets him apart. In Pete's film, one of the rules--at least at this point--was that memories (depicted as glowing glass globes) were stored in the brain by traveling through a maze of chutes into a kind of archive. When retrieved or remembered, they'd roll back down another tangle of chutes, like bowling balls being returned to bowlers at the alley.

 

That construct was elegant and effective, but Andrew suggested that another rule needed to be clarified: how memories and emotions change over time, as the brain gets older. This was the moment in the film, Andrew said, to establish some key themes. Listening to this, I remembered how in Toy Story 2, the addition of Wheezy helped establish the idea that damaged toys could be discarded, left to sit, unloved, on the shelf. Andrew felt there was a similar opportunity here. "Pete, this movie is about the inevitability of change," he said. "And of growing up."

 

This set Brad off. "A lot of us in this room have not grown up--and I mean that in the best way," he said. "The conundrum is how to become mature and become reliable while at the same time preserving your childlike wonder. People have come up to me many times, as I'm sure has happened to many people in this room, and said, ‘Gee, I wish I could be creative like you. That would be something, to be able to draw.' But I believe that everyone begins with the ability to draw. Kids are instinctively there. But a lot of them unlearn it. Or people tell them they can't or it's impractical. So yes, kids have to grow up, but maybe there's a way to suggest that they could be better off if they held on to some of their childish ideas.

 

"Pete, I want to give you a huge round of applause: This is a frickin' big idea to try to make a movie about," Brad continued, his voice full of affection. "I've said to you on previous films, ‘You're trying to do a triple backflip into a gale force wind, and you're mad at yourself for not sticking the landing. Like, it's amazing you're alive.' This film is the same. So, huge round of applause." Everyone clapped. Then Brad added, "And you're in for a world of hurt." . . .

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This set Brad off. "A lot of us in this room have not grown up--and I mean that in the best way," he said. "The conundrum is how to become mature and become reliable while at the same time preserving your childlike wonder. People have come up to me many times, as I'm sure has happened to many people in this room, and said, ‘Gee, I wish I could be creative like you. That would be something, to be able to draw.' But I believe that everyone begins with the ability to draw. Kids are instinctively there. But a lot of them unlearn it. Or people tell them they can't or it's impractical. So yes, kids have to grow up, but maybe there's a way to suggest that they could be better off if they held on to some of their childish ideas.

 

This reminds me of Dan Roam, author of Back of the Napkin. I saw him speak at a conference about how we all think we can't draw, but how we all drew (well or poorly) as children, and how we might recapture the ability to communicate visually as adults.

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New synopsis:

 

From the tepuis of South America to a monster-filled metropolis, Academy Award®-winning director Pete Docter has taken audiences to unique and imaginative places. In 2015, he will take us to the most extraordinary location of all – inside the mind of an 11-year-old named Riley.

Growing up can be a bumpy road, and it’s no exception for Riley, who is uprooted from her Midwest life when her father starts a new job in San Francisco. Like all of us, Riley is guided by her emotions – Joy (Amy Poehler), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith). The emotions live in Headquarters, the control center inside Riley’s mind, where they help advise her through everyday life. As Riley and her emotions struggle to adjust to a new life in San Francisco, turmoil ensues in Headquarters. Although Joy, Riley’s main and most important emotion, tries to keep things positive, the emotions conflict on how best to navigate a new city, house and school.

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New synopsis:

 

Like all of us, Riley is guided by her emotions – Joy (Amy Poehler), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), Disgust (Mindy Kaling) and Sadness (Phyllis Smith).

 

One positive emotion and four negative ones?

 

Do we need Disgust in addition to Fear and Anger? Is Disgust even an emotion?

 

If we have Fear, why not Courage or Curiosity?

 

What about Pride and Guilt?

 

What about Love?

 

Seems like an odd lineup.

Edited by SDG

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Reminder:

Pixar-Fact_o_114310.jpg

Of course, that guarantees nothing. But at this point, I'm still inclined to trust.

Edited by Overstreet

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Color me intrigued.  Don't quote me on this, but IIRC, from a neuroanatomical and neurophysiological standpoint, disgust is quite distinct from fear and anger.  I'm curious to see where they go with this.

Edited by Andrew

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