Peter T Chattaway

The Leftovers

31 posts in this topic

Link to our thread on the novel.

Links to our threads on the film version of Little Children (2006) and the book and in-development film versions of The Abstinence Teacher.

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HBO teaming with author Tom Perrotta

HBO is developing a series based on author Tom Perrotta's upcoming novel "The Leftovers."

Hourlong drama explores the Rapture and how the sudden disappearance of loved ones in a suburban town affects everyone left behind. Perrotta, who is writing the pilot, will exec produce with Ron Yerxa and Albert Berger. . . .

Variety, August 9

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And now, it's Damon Lindelof (of Lost fame) co-writing the script with Perrotta, and running the show, if it moves ahead.

Damon Lindelof Teams With Author Tom Perrotta For ‘The Leftovers’ Series At HBO

In his first TV series project since Lost, Damon Lindelof is heading to HBO for The Leftovers, a drama based on Tom Perrotta’s 2011 book, which the two will co-write together. This marks the first foray into cable for the Lost executive producer/co-showrunner and the first project under the rich three-year overall deal he recently signed with Warner Bros TV.

http://www.deadline....opment-writing/

Edited by Stephen Lamb

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Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights, Battleship, Very Bad Things, Hancock, etc.).

Hopefully, working with HBO will encourage his better inclinations and discourage the not so good inclinations that are demonstrated by this list.

It's just too bad that Paul Boyer isn't still around to work as a consultant for this.

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Justin Theroux has been cast as Kevin Garvey, "a chief of police and father of two who is trying to maintain some semblance of normalcy in this new world." And this news comes one day after I catch a screening of This Is the End.

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Guess who:

 

A half-hour ago the U.S. population was 317,947,517 — 2% suddenly disappearing would mean an out-of-the-blue absence of 6,358,950 people. The world population is 7,162,622,670 so a 2% reduction would be roughly 143,000,000. Honestly? There are too many on the globe as it is so a 2% reduction isn’t such a bad thing. How about 10% of the population ascending to Heaven? How about 20%? The more the merrier. As long as I don’t get picked, I mean.

Edited by Christian

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I'm not a huge fan of Hank Stuever's TV writing, but this is superb and makes me want to tune in and check out The Leftovers in two weeks:

 

Whether or not anyone wants to spend the summer staring directly at sorrow and regret, that’s precisely what HBO and the creators of the new drama “The Leftovers” seem to have in mind.

 

There’s nothing warm or welcoming about it, nor is there meant to be. Where the network’s “True Detective” occasionally broke its dolefulness with the slyest, philosophically artful wink at an audience riveted by its mystery, “The Leftovers” grafts more unhappiness onto unhappiness. Where “Game of Thrones” revels in even its most gruesome developments, it exists safely within the bounds of fantasy, so slay away. “The Leftovers” mainly acts as a means to deliver the worst news about human nature.

 

Yet, despite the downer language of this review, the show delivers on an exceedingly intriguing premise, with some of the most beguilingly morose performances delivered this year. It’s a strange but good wallow.

 

Using executive producer and writer Tom Perrotta’s sad and thoughtful novel as a template for a much broader story, “The Leftovers” (premiering June 29) is one of the coldest TV shows I’ve ever seen. It possesses almost no irony, few verbose monologues, a bare minimum of sharp moves, and a style that is conspicuously drab.

 

Watching it produces a numbness that isn’t anything like grief, but more like the tingly approach of a Novocaine local. The tongue can’t help returning to the hurt spot.

Edited by Christian

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Pilot episode to be directed by Peter Berg (Friday Night Lights, Battleship, Very Bad Things, Hancock, etc.).

I had forgotten about Berg's involvement until the credits came up. The first episode is pretty good. The odd music choices are consistently interesting, although I don't know that they're always successful. I had read Anne Thompson's negative review of the first episode before I watched it and was prepared to be let down by the show. Instead, I found it to be, at worst, baffling, but that's kind of the point. I certainly would watch it again if I had HBO. 

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Just finished watching the pilot. I'm ready to binge watch down the road if it turns out ok but will not spend an hour a week on this in the meantime.

 

As for the "and Faith" portion of our little pow-wow, I cannot imagine even spending another minute watching this past the baby disappearing scene if you didn't have some sort of appreciation for Jesus and the rapture.

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I finished the novel just a couple months ago, and the show is sticking pretty close to it so far. So much so, in fact, I'm not sure how much I'd get out of watching the whole series. It's not a strongly visual story.

Edited by Tyler

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I was struck by the dog killings, which I hadn't remembered from the book. Turns out the writer latched on to a mention of a dead dog in the novel and built out that element for the series.

 

I don't begrudge anyone dismissing a program based on its first episode, but I like "slow builds" myself and think this program has plenty of elements to keep me watching. Now, I read the book and didn't think it quite worked, but the show may be different.

 

So, I'd keep watching -- if I had HBO, which I don't. :)

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I am not a big fan of the show or the book for reasons recently explained at Filmwell. I think its use of the rapture concept ends up being little more than a gimmick to make the suburban drama stuff seem more compelling.

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Do those of you who have read the novel remember the specifics from last night's episode? I don't, but I wonder, in reading the recap (I've still only seen the first episode of the series), if the POV stuff throws me off and all of this was in the novel, told from an other-than-first-person viewpoint.

 

Anyway, sounds like a pivot episode -- possibly the one that could hook viewers who had been on the fence but were still giving the show a chance. I wonder how many people that group would comprise.

 

EDIT: Indiewire says "in its third episode, the first major departure from the book was made."

Edited by Christian

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Nikki Stafford of NikatNite recaps the latest episode (so, obviously, SPOILERS if you haven't seen it), and highlights some interesting symbolic imagery at the end, FWIW.

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Just learned from this podcast that the third episode was directed by Keith Gordon. That's a big "whoa!" revelation for me.

 

Is the lineup of directors for future episodes posted somewhere? I'll go check IMDB.

 

EDIT: Mimi Leder, Carl Franklin, dang!...

Edited by Christian

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What does it mean to say that someone "directed" an episode of a TV series? Is this like how Golden Age studio directors like Michael Curtiz choreographed everything on set, but left the editing to other people? Or do the "directors" on these TV shows actually oversee the episode all the way through post-production?

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I don't know how much control directors of TV episodes exert -- it probably differs series to series -- but surely you can tell the difference between, say, the Twin Peaks episodes directed by David Lynch and those directed by Mark Frost or others. In that case, Lynch created the show, so maybe it's more of a given that his episodes would show his signature elements .. but then why didn't the other episodes do that if the director's role was in some way minimized/controlled by others?

 

Maybe I'm not understanding your questions.

Edited by Christian

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Some interesting spin here on cross-platform ratings for the show. I'm never sure what to make of such numbers.

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What does it mean to say that someone "directed" an episode of a TV series? Is this like how Golden Age studio directors like Michael Curtiz choreographed everything on set, but left the editing to other people? Or do the "directors" on these TV shows actually oversee the episode all the way through post-production?

 

 

I don't know how much control directors of TV episodes exert -- it probably differs series to series -- but surely you can tell the difference between, say, the Twin Peaks episodes directed by David Lynch and those directed by Mark Frost or others. In that case, Lynch created the show, so maybe it's more of a given that his episodes would show his signature elements .. but then why didn't the other episodes do that if the director's role was in some way minimized/controlled by others?

 

My understanding, based on insider information which I've gleaned from multiple *television show commentaries* (and a very, very small web-series I run), is that a TV director is heavily involved in all three stages of production (of their individual episodes), freeing up the showrunner to keep an eye on the series as a whole.

 

So, while the showrunner is definitely the series' auteur, the director tends to be a bit more involved that the gun-for-hire directors of the studio Golden Age.

 

Is that close to what anyone is talking about?

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