Peter T Chattaway

The Leftovers

36 posts in this topic

I read recaps of this show throughout its first season, but have yet to see anything other than the premiere episode. I was gratified to see that the program took hold with a smallish following of viewers and critics.

 

On that note, Alan Sepinwall has selected The Leftovers as the year's best TV program.

 

When it comes to my top pick, you could argue that other shows had fewer flaws, made more narrative sense, and/or were more fun to watch. But no work of art in 2014 resonated with me more deeply than HBO’s “The Leftovers.” When books are adapted for TV or the movies, they’re often made more accessible, more conventional, less dark and less dense. But Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta went the opposite way in adapting Perrotta’s novel about an unconventional Rapture that sends the survivors into an emotional turmoil. This was a show that plunged its audience right into the broken world alongside all the poor saps stranded in a reality that no longer makes any sense, some trying to go on as before, some going to extremes in violent religious cults like the Guilty Remnant.
 

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‘Leftovers’ Shakes Up Supporting Cast For Season 2 As Series Moves To New Locale

EXCLUSIVE: The Sudden Departure event at the heart of the mythology of freshman HBO drama The Leftovers is spreading to the cast. I have learned that a large portion of the fourteen regular cast members in Season 1 — virtually all in supporting roles —  won’t be returning in Season 2 as the series is undergoing a creative reboot, moving the setting from the fictional town of Mapleton, New York to a new location.

Deadline.com, December 6

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I'm more than a bit behind (on the last episode of Season 1), and not having read the book, I really didn't know what I was signing up for.  But wow, I think this show is superb, the best show to deal with the psychological ramifications of traumatic loss since Six Feet Under or perhaps ever.  I don't know if this is what Perotta and co were attempting, but the town and its people serve as a powerful metaphor for the different ways of coping with loss.  The chief and others try to act normal but barely hold onto sanity, the Guilty Remnant acknowledge everything has lost its color/savor, the traditionally faithful find that their answers don't compute, and so on.  Definitely not easy watching, but emotionally insightful and resonant stuff.

Silly me, I went in expecting a secular Left Behind, but this is something so much better.  If Season Two maintains this high level, I'll have to write about this.

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On November 18, 2015 at 3:46:31 AM, Andrew said:

I'm more than a bit behind (on the last episode of Season 1), and not having read the book, I really didn't know what I was signing up for.  But wow, I think this show is superb, the best show to deal with the psychological ramifications of traumatic loss since Six Feet Under or perhaps ever.  I don't know if this is what Perotta and co were attempting, but the town and its people serve as a powerful metaphor for the different ways of coping with loss.  The chief and others try to act normal but barely hold onto sanity, the Guilty Remnant acknowledge everything has lost its color/savor, the traditionally faithful find that their answers don't compute, and so on.  Definitely not easy watching, but emotionally insightful and resonant stuff.

Silly me, I went in expecting a secular Left Behind, but this is something so much better.  If Season Two maintains this high level, I'll have to write about this.

I'm caught up on Season 2. I don't want to spoil anything, but it is even better, in my opinion, than season 1, and I loved season 1. It's finding new ways of expanding on exactly what you already love about the show. Damon Lindelof has always been great at presenting mysteries, and always rather unsatisfactory when "solving" them in his narratives. This show gives him a chance to tackle unsolvable mysteries and ask unanswerable questions and then explore the ramifications, and I think it's exactly what he needs to be doing. 

 

Edit: Having just finished the Season 2 finale: You're in for a treat, Andrew. This is one of my favourite seasons of television ever. 

Edited by Scholar's Parrot

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anyone watching season 3? ive been reading lately about the idea of gazing on the image and idea of the crucified christ, as a way of leading to personal transformation. i feel like that is one of the many themes of this show, when dealing with suffering. particularly, im thinking of nora at the end of season 1 and her family.

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This ended last night to wild acclaim, as it should. Leftovers tackled faith, doubt, and mystery unlike anything I've ever seen before (and better than many things I've seen) and I'm surprised more people here didn't watch.

One (non-spoilery) thing I found really interesting was that this final season started on Easter and ended on Pentecost and this was definitely intentional. 

I have the same question as spoon: Did anyone else watch this?

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I have watched the whole thing, as it does speak well at times to issues of faith and trauma. But I just do not respond well to Lindelof screenwriting. He constructs storylines the same way my kids and I decorate our Christmas tree. Keep piling stuff on until it is effulgent. If you look too close, it won't bear up to much scrutiny in terms of proportion, scale, or coherency. But it is pleasant to look at from a distance.

The last two episode prior to the finale are good examples of this, as they veered pretty wildly away from any and all plotting undertaken in Seasons 1-3.2 in an overt attempt to set up for a hugely meaningful finale. And Lindelof certainly delivers on that. But as a counter-example, something like Rectify does more heavy lifting with far less.

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My wife and I loved this (Season 1 > 3 > 2).  The final season is batshit crazy but iresistibly watchable.  I couldn't tolerate Lost, nor the source material for this show, but yeah, this worked for me.  Terrific finale; the entire third season explores the desperate things that people will believe to make grief and the brevity of life bearable, but credibly keeps an open mind as to the objective veracity of some of those beliefs.  As Iris Dement's opening tune states, they're willing to let the mystery be.

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