Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Mr. Arkadin

Mysteries of Lisbon (2010)

Recommended Posts

But most of all Ruiz reminds me of Welles in his camera work. And narratively, this is part KANE and part THE SARAGOSSA MANUSCRIPT, which I mentioned above.

Sounds like you will have a field day with Three Crowns of the Sailor, which feels like late period Welles (particularly The Immortal Story) and spins one of the most insanely convoluted narratives in the history of cinema.


"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

Twitter     Letterboxd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But most of all Ruiz reminds me of Welles in his camera work. And narratively, this is part KANE and part THE SARAGOSSA MANUSCRIPT, which I mentioned above.

Sounds like you will have a field day with Three Crowns of the Sailor, which feels like late period Welles (particularly The Immortal Story) and spins one of the most insanely convoluted narratives in the history of cinema.

Oh, I did. It was the first Ruiz I watched and I think it's fantastic.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But most of all Ruiz reminds me of Welles in his camera work. And narratively, this is part KANE and part THE SARAGOSSA MANUSCRIPT, which I mentioned above.

Sounds like you will have a field day with Three Crowns of the Sailor, which feels like late period Welles (particularly The Immortal Story) and spins one of the most insanely convoluted narratives in the history of cinema.

Oh, I did. It was the first Ruiz I watched and I think it's fantastic.

Ah, now I see. It was my first Ruiz as well (I've only seen 3 or 4), and I don't think I ever recovered from it. It certainly colored my reaction to his Proust adaptation. I still don't think Time Regained is a particularly good movie, but it's nevertheless a brave attempt at adapting the unadaptable.


"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

Twitter     Letterboxd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, now I see. It was my first Ruiz as well (I've only seen 3 or 4), and I don't think I ever recovered from it. It certainly colored my reaction to his Proust adaptation. I still don't think Time Regained is a particularly good movie, but it's nevertheless a brave attempt at adapting the unadaptable.

I haven't seen his TIME REGAINED. I've got SUSPENDED VOCATION on queue next from Ruiz.

When I see TIME REGAINED I'm sure my reaction will be coloured by the fact that my supervisor had a funny reaction to my wanting to do some work on Ruiz's films, by stating he didn't think Ruiz's Proust adaptation was very good. I'm not sure, but that might be one of the only Ruiz film he's seen.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, now I see. It was my first Ruiz as well (I've only seen 3 or 4), and I don't think I ever recovered from it. It certainly colored my reaction to his Proust adaptation. I still don't think Time Regained is a particularly good movie, but it's nevertheless a brave attempt at adapting the unadaptable.

I haven't seen his TIME REGAINED. I've got SUSPENDED VOCATION on queue next from Ruiz.

When I see TIME REGAINED I'm sure my reaction will be coloured by the fact that my supervisor had a funny reaction to my wanting to do some work on Ruiz's films, by stating he didn't think Ruiz's Proust adaptation was very good. I'm not sure, but that might be one of the only Ruiz film he's seen.

I remember thinking it was a bit slack and full of overdecorative touches, but it's by no means terrible. It's still probably most people's idea of art house hell.


"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

Twitter     Letterboxd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the film something that can be cut up into more than one sitting, or does that defeat the film's intended effect? I'm wondering how I'm going to carve out the time to watch the DVD once I get hold of it, and am thinking that watching it in chunks might work. But not if that kills the movie's rhythms.

If you're gonna break it up, I would recommend splitting it up into halves. (The film has an intermission.)

I tried. I made it through the first part in two sittings, but it was a bit of a struggle. I gave up the next day, about 15 minutes into Part 2. As I mentioned elsewhere online, I appreciate the elegance of the camerawork here, but the story wasn't of enough interest to keep me watching. I wanted more of the scenes from the men's earlier lives -- when the film had almost a Western vibe, rather than the carefully appointed costume-drama feeling of most of it.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, now I see. It was my first Ruiz as well (I've only seen 3 or 4), and I don't think I ever recovered from it. It certainly colored my reaction to his Proust adaptation. I still don't think Time Regained is a particularly good movie, but it's nevertheless a brave attempt at adapting the unadaptable.

I haven't seen his TIME REGAINED. I've got SUSPENDED VOCATION on queue next from Ruiz.

When I see TIME REGAINED I'm sure my reaction will be coloured by the fact that my supervisor had a funny reaction to my wanting to do some work on Ruiz's films, by stating he didn't think Ruiz's Proust adaptation was very good. I'm not sure, but that might be one of the only Ruiz film he's seen.

I remember thinking it was a bit slack and full of overdecorative touches, but it's by no means terrible. It's still probably most people's idea of art house hell.

Could a Proust adaptation be anything else?

I liked TIME REGAINED quite a bit, though the DVD release is appallingly bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the film something that can be cut up into more than one sitting, or does that defeat the film's intended effect? I'm wondering how I'm going to carve out the time to watch the DVD once I get hold of it, and am thinking that watching it in chunks might work. But not if that kills the movie's rhythms.

If you're gonna break it up, I would recommend splitting it up into halves. (The film has an intermission.)

I tried. I made it through the first part in two sittings, but it was a bit of a struggle. I gave up the next day, about 15 minutes into Part 2. As I mentioned elsewhere online, I appreciate the elegance of the camerawork here, but the story wasn't of enough interest to keep me watching. I wanted more of the scenes from the men's earlier lives -- when the film had almost a Western vibe, rather than the carefully appointed costume-drama feeling of most of it.

200488557-001-dc53a697-a8ed-45bf-a3c7-714612295520.jpg

Edited by Ryan H.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reviving this thread!  I just finished watching this for the first time, encouraged as I was by the enthusiasm of Ryan, Jeremy, and others. 

Impressive...really all I can say since it is almost midnight and our baby just started crying. :)

Anyone ever track down an English version of this novel? 

Also, how have you all found this on repeat views...greater still?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Brian D said:

Impressive...really all I can say since it is almost midnight and our baby just started crying. :)

Anyone ever track down an English version of this novel? 

Also, how have you all found this on repeat views...greater still?

I've seen it four times now and love it as much as ever.

I've not been able to find an English translation of the novel. As far as I've been able to tell, one has never existed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got the perfect extra for a future Criterion release for this film: an English language translation of the novel! That novel has gotta clock in at 800+ pages with this much narrative packed in. So my proposal is a modest one that would take years to carry out. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take it most folks here already know, but just in case: Mysteries of Lisbon is currently streaming as a 6-part miniseries - the first time it's been available in the U.S. in that format.

I wasn't as taken with the film as others here were, but the relative dearth of new releases via streaming has me considering Lisbon again. Still, for $14.99, I'm much more interested in seeing Satantango. I just have to find 7.5 hours over a three-day rental window. That's proved challenging.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Christian said:

I take it most folks here already know, but just in case: Mysteries of Lisbon is currently streaming as a 6-part miniseries - the first time it's been available in the U.S. in that format.

I wasn't as taken with the film as others here were, but the relative dearth of new releases via streaming has me considering Lisbon again. Still, for $14.99, I'm much more interested in seeing Satantango. I just have to find 7.5 hours over a three-day rental window. That's proved challenging.

At least in Canada, Sátántangó is streaming free on Kanopy if you have access through your public or university library.


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Anders said:

At least in Canada, Sátántangó is streaming free on Kanopy if you have access through your public or university library.

I do not, but I appreciate the tip! Part of my hesitancy has been whether, if I rent the movie with a day left in its availability at Filmlinc.org (it's been extended a couple of times, but as of the last time I checked, there was no mention on the site of the movie continuing beyond this Thursday), I'll be granted the full three-day window of rental availability. I admit that it seems unlikely I wouldn't be granted the full window, but streaming through local theaters (or, in this case, not so local theaters) is still new to me. A movie of such length is a multi-day investment. I don't want to pay full price only to be told, halfway through my viewing, that the movie is no longer available on the platform from which I rented it.

Has anyone gone through this? If so, please set my mind at ease. Thanks! (Oh, and sorry for yet another digression from the main thread/discussion, although the length of Mysteries of Lisbon means there may be application for that title as well as for Satantango.)

Edited by Christian

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Christian said:

I just have to find 7.5 hours over a three-day rental window.

Sorry, you're only allowed to watch Satantango projected in 35mm in a single day with one 30-minute intermission. Like I did. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...