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Knight of Cups (2015)

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Showblitz breaks the news:
 

Christian Bale and Cate Blanchett are both set to star in two upcoming Terence Malick films, both of which will be launched to buyers at the American Film Market being held this week in Santa Monica, Variety's Diana Lodderhose was first to report. The first, LAWLESS, will topline Ryan Gosling, Bale, Blanchett, Rooney Mara and, as Variety first reported, Haley Bennett (MARLEY & ME). Malick’s second pic, KNIGHT OF CUPS, will star Bale, Blanchett and Isabel Lucas (IMMORTALS, TRANSFORMERS: REVENGE OF THE FALLEN.) Both pics are currently in pre-production and will shoot back-to-back in 2012. Details of the two plots are being kept under wraps but both titles will be separate narratives.


Do we have a thread for this already?

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Links to our threads on Badlands (1973), Days of Heaven (1978), The Thin Red Line (1998), The New World (2005), The Tree of Life (2011), To the Wonder (2012) and Lawless (????).

Tyler wrote:

: So, who finally showed Malick it doesn't take 10 years to make a movie?

You say that as though The Burial, Lawless and Knight of Cups had actually been COMPLETED already.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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So, about that title...

Should be fun to see what all the Christians who went gaga over The Tree of Life do with THIS.

Indeed.

Ha! I had no idea. When I first saw this title yesterday, I thought it sounded idiotic. I knew it had to mean something. I just wasn't sure what.

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So Knight of Cups is about the movie business? Hmmm, wonder if this will figure into the semi-autobiographical trend we've already seen in Tree of Life and To the Wonder...

- - -

Terrence Malick’s producers: ‘He wakes up every day with thousands more ideas.’

SG: We recently finished shooting Knight of Cups, which is about the LA movie business. Our untitled film, the one set against the music scene in Texas, will begin shooting in a few weeks. It was called Lawless but we agreed to give that name to John Hillcoat.

Christian Bale ia a lead in Knight of Cups and has a supporting role in the untitled film, and both are set in the contemporary world. We’ll edit them simultaneously and FilmNation is on board both. We consider FilmNation partners on all of Terry’s films going forward. . . .

Screen Daily, September 4

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Tucker   

as with any Malick film in production or waiting for release, I am so curious

 

I do wonder, however, as to the depth and richness of this film and Lawless (or I should say "Untitled Terrence Malick project"). His other films took years, and the "making of" featurettes tend to point to lot's of research, painstaking production/post-production, etc. I wonder how Knight of Cups will hold up to his previous films given that is comes quickly on the heels of TO THE WONDER (which also was a quick release and which I loved) and is in production at the same time as his next film.

 

btw, anyone here attend Dr. John O'Callaghan's lecture on THE TREE OF LIFE and St. Augustine's Confessions? (http://augustinemalick.weebly.com/)

Edited by Tucker

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Tucker   

it's a couple years old now, but just found this clip. Notice Malick in the tan, wide-brimmed hat and light colored pants, and the olive vest.

 

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"The Lowdown on Terrence Malick's Three New Films":

... Banderas, in an interview with Collider, has possibly the best and fullest description of Malick's new way of working:

 

"I remember when I got to the set in the morning, [Terrence] called me and said, 'Antonio, I'm sorry I didn't send you the script. You know why I didn't send you the script?' I said, 'No.' He said, 'Well, there is no script. We are just working as we go. I am creating the movie as I go. I have a central character and I have certain ideas, and I put him in different situations of life. The guy just tries to be a sponge and suck up everything he sees because he's an artist. So, I'm shooting a lot of things, and I don't know what I'm going to edit because I have a movie where, if I put together the whole entire thing, it might be as long as a week. But, I invite you to play. Feel free. You have this [9-page] monologue. You can start the monologue in the middle, if you want. I'm going to shoot it in different locations, in this party that we have over here. We're going to shoot it in the pool, in the hall, in this dancing scene, in the garden. So, you just relax and enjoy acting. If you even have any idea, please just throw it out.' " ...

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SDG   

That confirms my suspicions regarding Malick's current filmmaking process.

It's all kinda slice of Malick, isn't it?

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And I don't see any problem at all with a method like that. Artists in all kinds of media collect resources, then sit down to see what they've got, and "edit." Cinema is a cumbersome medium for that kind of work, but hey, if you're Malick, you can afford to work that way. And I like what he finds when he gets into the editing room and starts looking to see what emerges.

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And I don't see any problem at all with a method like that. Artists in all kinds of media collect resources, then sit down to see what they've got, and "edit." Cinema is a cumbersome medium for that kind of work, but hey, if you're Malick, you can afford to work that way. And I like what he finds when he gets into the editing room and starts looking to see what emerges.

I don't mean to suggest it's a "wrong" method. I do think such a strongly improvisational approach to filmmaking has unique risks, but it can also lead to unique rewards. Edited by Ryan H.

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Improvisation is about spontaneous performance without much as it relates to specific preparation, and the word also can imply an absence of resources one might expect in order to produce a solution.

 

Malick's films work quite well for me precisely because he is absolutely prepared--and in a very specific theological sense, I suspect--to have all the "resources" he needs when he turns the camera on. You might even say there is a sense in which this is the very subject of his filmmaking.

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I don't find all (or even most) of the moments/images Malick discovers through his process to be compelling, and I'm rarely satisfied with the way in which he stitches discrete moments together into a feature film.

That said, I wouldn't say that those issues stem from an "absence of resources," per se.

Edited by Ryan H.

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Joel C   

I don't find all (or even most) of the moments/images Malick discovers through his process are compelling, and I'm rarely satisfied with the way in which he stitches discrete moments together into a feature film.

That said, I wouldn't say that those issues stem from an "absence of resources," per se.

I would say if there are actual issues, they probably stem from a massive overabundance of resources, though personally I find his "stitching" to be more cohesive than you do. 

 

This is an interesting discussion, because as a composer, especially when working with first-time production teams, the great angst of post-production almost always seems to be getting to picture lock. A lot of people in post are on hold until there is a completed, locked edit, and multiple times this year, my start date has been pushed back because of edits that weren't completed in time. 

 

I can't even begin to imagine what "picture lock" looks like for Malick. No wonder it takes him decades to produce films. I usually end up deeply appreciating what his process produces, but still. This is why, where most films have one editor, Malick has five.

 

And yet, like many, many other people in the film industry, I would drop everything immediately to work on a Malick film. Which is probably why he knows he can have the kinds of conversations with his cast and crew that he had with Banderas.

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I keep thinking back to the junket for The New World, and how Wes Studi said he barely ever heard the word "cut" -- the only way he knew he could stop acting was when one of the camera crew yelled "rollout!", meaning that they had used up all ten minutes of film in the cartridge.

 

I shudder to think of what acting on a Malick film would be like if he's switched to digital cameras (which can record hours at a time).

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