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Link to our thread on the 2003 short film of the same name.

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Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu Attached to Direct Warner's 'The Revenant' (Exclusive)

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu is attached to direct Warner Bros.' "The Revenant," a revenge story set in the 1800s, an individual close to project confirmed to TheWrap.

The director of "Biutiful" and "Babel", Inarritu gravitates toward foreboding, character-driven stories. And this qualifies.

In "The Revenant," a fur trapper is mauled by a bear. The captain of his ship tries to carry him back to civilization, but the terrain is impossible, and he can't do it. So the captain hires two men to stay behind and bury him after he dies.

Instead of making his last days comfortable, the men rob him and leave to die alone in the cold. He survives and heads off to seek his revenge. . . .

TheWrap.com, August 17

Leonardo DiCaprio, Sean Penn Wanted Men For New Regency’s ‘The Revenant’

EXCLUSIVE: Now that New Regency closed a deal to fully fund the Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu-directed The Revenant, the Biutiful helmer has set his sights on Leonardo DiCaprio and Sean Penn to play the two leads in the screen adaptation of the Michael Punke novel. I’m told they’ve met with Inarritu, but that if this cast materializes it would mean starting next fall. In the Mark L. Smith-scripted drama, DiCaprio is being courted to play 1820s frontiersman Hugh Glass, who hires on to a fur trapping expedition and is so badly mauled by a bear that he’s unable to be transported back from the wilderness. He hires two men to stay behind. Expecting him to die, they rob and abandon him instead, leaving him helpless. When he recovers, he is hellbent on revenge. Inarritu wants Penn to play one of the men who left him for dead. . . .

Mike Fleming, Deadline.com, November 4


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Variety:

 

 

After taking his time in figuring out what his next film will be, Leonardo DiCaprio has decided to go with New Regency and Fox’s “The Revenant” as that next pic, with Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu set to direct.

 

DiCaprio and Inarritu have been attached to the project for awhile but could not find the time to fit it into their schedules. The idea is to get the film into production this fall.

 

Pic is based on the Michael Punke novel centering on a 1820s frontiersman on a path of vengeance against those who left him for dead after a bear mauling. Mark L. Smith and Inarritu penned the script.

 

We have an old, unrelated thread (2004) about a film titled The Revenant.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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I'm surprised the article mentions nothing about the Richard Harris film Man in the Wilderness, which was also based on the story of Hugh Glass.


Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Tom Hardy joins the cast.

Apparently, we did have a 2011 thread for this film.

Edited by John Drew

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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I believe the word you're looking for is "Ahem." :)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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As with so much Innaritu — looks visually astonishing, but gives me the sense that the look will feel show-offy and expose an undercooked screenplay. I hope I'm wrong.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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The Hollywood Reporter details how the shoot has become a "living hell," according to some crewmembers.

 

Shooting was supposed to end in March, but will now go through August (on a movie opening on Christmas). A lot of the trouble comes from decisions to only shoot using natural light, and to use a single-shoot-stitching technique similar to Birdman.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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I just noticed this film has the exact same roll out dates as Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful 8.  Limited release on Christmas Day, followed by a January 8th wide release.  When is the last time two studios have released head to head Westerns?  Going back 30 years, Pale Rider and Silverado came close, but their release dates were separated by two weeks.

Edited by John Drew

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Let's see, Wyatt Earp and Maverick each came out within a month of each other during the summer of 1994. In 1993, you had Geronimo: An American Legend and Tombstone debuted within two weeks of one another. Dances with Wolves and Quigley Down Under hit screens about a month apart from each other in the fall of 1992.

 

Going back a ways, John Wayne took a graceful final bow when The Shootist opened in May '76. In August of that same year, Clint Eastwood took the reigns with The Outlaw Josey Wales. (Talk about a changing of the guard!)

 

I reckon not since Buchanan Rides Alone (Columbia) squared off with The Fiend that Walked the West (Fox) on August 1st, 1958 did we see a showdown like the one we'll see on December 25th. Yessir, that'll be a weekend to remember!

Edited by Nathaniel

"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

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Right now, I'm favoring seeing this ahead of The Hateful 8.

I also just found and ordered a copy of Man in the Wilderness (1971), starring Richard Harris, which is also based on the story of Hugh Glass.  Co-starring John Huston, and directed by Richard Sarafian, who may be best known for his other 1971 film Vanishing Point.

Edited by John Drew

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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Godawa: "The reason I am so impressed with Inarritu is because he is like Terrence Malick with a good story."

You know you're gonna love this review when you see the title is "Oscar Watch • The Revenant: Vengeance is God’s, and God Ain’t No Pacifist."

Happy New Year.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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John Drew said:  

Right now, I'm favoring seeing this ahead of The Hateful 8.

 

Me as well.

 

Overstreet said: 

The Revenant: Vengeance is God’s, and God Ain’t No Pacifist."

 

Maybe Godawa should read the parts that indicate that vengeance isn't compatible with LOVE.  In Hebrews where it mentions vengeance it is directly quoting from a passage in Deuteronomy, where the passage is about the Lord setting the person right for him.  In other words it's ultimately an act of kindness setting the person right, and in context of Romans 1 it comes from a "giving over."  It's not active action.  I've got some good books I'd love to put in some of these folks hands, such as this one.

It's interesting how some of this type of thinking saturates into so much in people's lives including how movies are perceived.

 

 

Edited by Attica

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The Revenant “embraces the totality of life, nature and experience… not like anything I’ve seen before.” Check out the detailed, candid conversation....

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Loved this film and the message it seemed to be heading towards, til the very last action by Leo Dicaprio's character sort of undermines the message entirely. And I'm not even sure if that was unintentional.


"The truth is you're the weak, and I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin Ringo, I'm tryin real hard to be the shepherd." Pulp Fiction

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Godawa's first paragraph:

Quote

Though we don’t have the Oscar nominations yet, I labeled this as one of my 2015 Oscar Watch commentaries because after seeing it, I am confident of two things: 1. The Revenant will receive an Oscar nomination for best picture and best director, and 2. Leonardo DiCaprio will win best actor for his gut wrenching performance as the frontiersman Hugh Glass.

1. I will be shocked if it receives either. EDIT: On second thought, it was nominated for both at the Globes, so maybe it will.

2. That's probably going to happen.

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Evan C wrote:
: I will be shocked if it receives either. EDIT: On second thought, it was nominated for both at the Globes, so maybe it will.

It's also a Producers Guild Award nominee. (It missed out on the Screen Actors Guild "ensemble" award, but then, I'm not sure how much of an "ensemble" there really is in this film: it's largely the Leo show. And Leo *did* get a SAG nomination.)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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This is the film Peter kept bringing up on Twitter/FB about the actors' breath fogging up the camera, yes?

The cinematography is immersive, and the soundtrack is affecting at times. The bear scene was intense. And...that's about it for me. It was an exercise in excruciation. I suppose the performances were solid in a physically-demanding sort of way, but I found myself thinking The Grey is a superior film about a very similar situation, albeit in a modern setting. I can't help but think Iñárritu just adds images (particularly religious ones) for the sake of provocation, but with little-to-nothing behind them in terms of actual ideas.

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DiCaprio and Hardy's character arcs were both so flat and straightforward that I had trouble staying engaged with them. I would have been more interested in a movie about Domhnall Gleeson's Captain Henry. 

Did anyone else laugh when Hugh tauntauned his horse


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

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My biggest problem is that the film is too long by at least half an hour. Lubezki's work is technically impressive, but (I think it was D'Angelo who pointed this out) it doesn't really fit the grueling, grizzly narrative. DiCaprio's work is very good, but his character isn't developed enough, and that's the screenplay's fault. If you thought Hardy was difficult to understand as Bane, he's taken the mumbling with a funny accent to a whole new level, which I primarily found distracting. And the breathing onto the camera lens took me completely out of the story by reminding me that I was watching a film.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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