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Tyler

Awake

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Awake is a cop show with a twist--following a serious accident, Michael Britten (Jason Isaacs) sees his life split in two: in one half, his wife is alive and his son died in the accident, and in the other, the son is alive and the wife died. Britten and his therapists (B.D. Wong in one half, Cherry Jones in the other) can't figure out which half is real and which is a dream.

I know from Twitter that Anna, Lauren, and I are watching; any other fans out there?

And for Chattaway: The series uses different color palettes to distinguish between the two realities. One is mainly teal, and the other is primarily orange.

Edited by Tyler

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I liked the pilot, but the development (or non-development) in the second episode had me thinking this show won't have legs.

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I liked the pilot, but the development (or non-development) in the second episode had me thinking this show won't have legs.

Did you watch all the way to the end? The scene with the Laura Innes character definitely hinted that there's more going on than just the procedural angle.

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So far I've only seen epi. 1. Has a Life on Mars feel to it.

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Tyler wrote:

: And for Chattaway: The series uses different color palettes to distinguish between the two realities. One is mainly teal, and the other is primarily orange.

Augugugugugugugugugugh!

Or however they used to say it in the Charlie Brown comic strips.

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Did you watch all the way to the end? The scene with the Laura Innes character definitely hinted that there's more going on than just the procedural angle.

Sure. But I'm mighty skeptical that the conspiracy they hint at is actually going to turn out to be an interesting one.

Tyler wrote:

: And for Chattaway: The series uses different color palettes to distinguish between the two realities. One is mainly teal, and the other is primarily orange.

Augugugugugugugugugugh!

Or however they used to say it in the Charlie Brown comic strips.

AWAKE is not *really* teal-and-orange. The alleged "teal" is more of a gray-blue, and the alleged "orange" is more of a beige-gold.

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Tyler wrote:

: And for Chattaway: The series uses different color palettes to distinguish between the two realities. One is mainly teal, and the other is primarily orange.

Augugugugugugugugugugh!

Or however they used to say it in the Charlie Brown comic strips.

AWAKE is not *really* teal-and-orange. The alleged "teal" is more of a gray-blue, and the alleged "orange" is more of a beige-gold.

Ooooooooooo....!!! Someone must own the fancy 120 Crayola Crayon set.... :P

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Awake is a cop show with a twist--following a serious accident, Michael Britten (Jason Isaacs) sees his life split in two: in one half, his wife is alive and his son died in the accident, and in the other, the son is alive and the wife died. Britten and his therapists (B.D. Wong in one half, Cherry Jones in the other) can't figure out which half is real and which is a dream.

I know from Twitter that Anna, Lauren, and I are watching; any other fans out there?

{waves} I was a fan of Kyle Killen's Lone Star, which lasted about three episodes, so I have to see how this shapes up. Plus, great cast!

And for Chattaway: The series uses different color palettes to distinguish between the two realities. One is mainly teal, and the other is primarily orange.

Oh, come on. Check your TV settings. Ryan H is righter--cold blue for one reality, a sort of warm glow over the other one, but it doesn't say "orange." Is there some problem males have with color perception, beyond the known greater tendency to red/green color-blindness? :)

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I stuck with this show to the end, even after I knew it was getting cancelled. The finale was tonight, and it came within one minute of being a really good season. But then the big resolution was that everything that had happened in the whole show (i.e. both halves of Michael's reality) was all a dream, within a dream (or something like that). So instead of making a decision (of which reality was "real") and figuring out the consequences of that, it copped out and said that neither of them were.

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Or there's another explanation? Allen Sepinwall interviews Kyle Killen (Spoilers if you haven't watched the finale)

I still think it's brilliant.

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If I'm understanding Killen's interpretation, it's that the final scene wasn't Britten "waking up" from the dream(s), but him descending into or creating a deeper level of dream, ala Inception. Is that what you got from it? The way the colors from the red and green world blended together in the final scene meant that he was waking up and leaning his combined fears from both dreams (that either wife or son had died) were just his unconscious, and that now he was finally back in the real world.

The reason that's so unsatisfying for me is that it means nothing in the entire season (the crash, the police conspiracy, everything) mattered since it didn't really happen. The "deeper in" explanation is better, but it still doesn't give me enough of an idea of what actually pushed Britten into the dreamscapes.

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