Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Tyler

Tomorrowland (was 1952)

Recommended Posts

Deadline:

Brad Bird has been set to direct 1952, a script that Disney paid former Lost producer Damon Lindelof last year to write. The film, which Lindelof is writing with Jeff Jensen, is a closely guarded secret at Disney, but it’s a big scale tent pole film. I’m not sure if it’s a reference to the year, or a Lost reference. But it has multi-platform aspirations, and the studio hopes it will be the next film directed by Bird, who made the leap from animation to live action feature directing with the blockbuster Mission: Impossible–Ghost Protocol.

Not sure what this means for 1906, the San Francisco earthquake movie that Bird has been attached to for four years. IMDB says it's still in pre-production.

Edited by Tyler

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is almost a joke there about Bird working his way back from 1952 to 1906 by making a film in each decade, all nine years apart. But the math misses by one year, darn it.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nuts, since that would have been a good joke! They would have had to change the title to 1952-Down. :P


That's just how eye roll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Details Emerge on Mysterious Damon Lindelof–Brad Bird Project

Correction by Claude Brodesser-Akner: Apparently I misunderstood my source for this story, who contacted me after it was posted to clarify that while it is true that 1952 is very much in the spirit of Close Encounters (and centers around a Roy Neary-like protagonist), it is not in fact about an alien encounter. . . .

While our sources maintain that the film is not set in 1952, there is an intriguing backstory to the title. We hear that last spring, when Lindelof had a meeting to discuss the project with Disney’s head of production, Sean Bailey, the Disney exec arranged for Lindelof to be given access to one of the studios odder curiosities: a banker’s box of files and documents that had been left moldering in Walt Disney’s personal development lab, WED Enterprises, which later became the studio’s vaunted Imagineering department. The box was originally labeled with the title of the studio’s 1965 comedy That Darn Cat!, which had been crossed out and in its place was written “1952.” . . .

Vulture, New York, October 17


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Starring ... George Clooney?

This may not be as big a risk as hiring Taylor Kitsch, but, still, Clooney's not exactly a big box-office draw. Apart from the Ocean's ensemble trilogy, he has starred in only two other films that grossed over $100 million in North America, both of which came out over a decade ago: 2000's The Perfect Storm and 1997's Batman & Robin, the latter of which remains the lowest-grossing live-action Batman movie since the '60s. And he's made only two other films that scored over $60.7 million, namely 2009's Up in the Air and 2011's The Descendants, both of which climbed over $80 million partly because they had serious Oscar buzz.

In fact, when you look at the *worldwide* grosses, the best he's ever done outside of an ensemble film, a Batman movie, The Perfect Storm or the aforementioned Oscar-buzz movies is $120.2 million. *Worldwide*.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Retitled, according to an update I just received via email:

Disney’s 1952 Officially Titled Tomorrowland

The Walt Disney Studios has announced that its live-action release previously known as 1952 will be titled Tomorrowland. The film will be released domestically on December 19, 2014. George Clooney (The Descendants) is set to star.

Tomorrowland is written by Damon Lindelof and Brad Bird from a concept by Lindelof and Jeff Jensen. Lindelof (Star Trek, Lost, Prometheus) will produce and Bird (The Incredibles, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol) will produce and direct.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Via PTC on Facebook: Is Brad Bird's "Tomorrowland" movie about that "UFOs are real" TV show which Walt Disney Productions almost made back in the 1950s? (Long headlines are long.)

So let's review those clues again. We have a picture of Walt Disney meeting with a senior U.S. military official. We have a blue book. We have a science fiction magazine entitled "Amazing Stories." And we have a mystery box with a "1952" label stuck on its side that's filled with photographs & recordings from the late 1940s / early 1950s.

To borrow a phrase that's heard most every night on "Wheel of Fortune," "I'd like to solve the puzzle, Pat." Based on the evidence in this photograph as well as info that has previously leaked out about this Brad Bird / Damon Lindelof project, I believe that "Tomorrowland" has something to do with Project Blue Book, the program that the U.S. Air Force launched in late 1952 / early 1953 for the investigation of unidentified flying objects.

And to now get really, really specific here, I believe that this upcoming Walt Disney Pictures release (which is due to hit theaters on December 19, 2014) uses a behind-the-scenes story that the late Ward Kimball loved to tell as its jumping-off point. Where -- during the mid-1950s -- the U.S. government supposedly approached Walt Disney and then asked for his help in producing a TV show that would eventually be used to break the news to the American public that UFOS are real.

Which -- I know -- sounds kind of bizarre. But you have to remember that -- back during World War II -- Walt Disney Studios made all sorts of

for the U.S. military. And many of these movies made use of highly sensitive, classified material.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Link to our thread on the Walt Disney Treasures DVD sets, one of which was devoted to Tomorrowland.

Jim Hill asks: "Is Brad Bird's "Tomorrowland" movie about that "UFOs are real" TV show which Walt Disney Productions almost made back in the 1950s?"

Ah, I see Tyler beat me to it. I tried for 10-15 minutes to post a similar excerpt here, but I kept getting an error message about how I couldn't post a certain kind of "image extension" -- this, despite the fact that my post had no images. Ah well.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And as the villain... Hugh Laurie.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exclusive: The secret of Brad Bird's 'Tomorrowland' is not what you think

I've told several filmmakers over the years that the moment they lose control of information is when they send out either scripts or detailed break-downs for the purposes of casting. That sort of thing goes out fairly wide, and even if agencies try to keep things locked down, there are a lot of eyes on those documents.

If I were making something uber-secret in that climate, I would send out break-downs that ask for the right kind of actor for casting while offering up story and character details that are absolutely inaccurate. That way, they'll see the right actors, but if anything leaks, it's misinformation and nothing is ruined.

Do I know for sure if this is the "real" logline description for "Tomorrowland"? Nope. But what I do know is that this is the official description that's being used to help assemble a cast, and it offers the first concrete plot ideas for what we'll see when "Tomorrowland" arrives in theaters in 2014.

"A teenage girl, a genius middle-aged man (who was kicked out of Tomorrowland) and a pre-pubescent girl robot attempt to get to and unravel what happened to Tomorrowland, which exists in an alternative dimension, in order to save Earth."

See what I mean? That's not at all what I expected.

The "Tomorrowland" that they keep referring to in this break-down appears to be a place where science has blown past the world we live in, and when Frank Walker was a young man, he first encountered the promise of Tomorrowland at the 1964 World's Fair. David Nix was there, showing off his own work, and he told Walker to come back when he was older and his inventions actually worked. A girl named Athena saw great promise in 11-year-old Frank, though, and she snuck him into Tomorrowland. Eventually, Frank was discovered by Nix and thrown out, but not before learning that the girl he loved, Athena, was actually a robot.

By the time we meet Frank in the film, he's much older, and George Clooney is set to play the part. Nix is the role that Hugh Laurie is signed for, and by the point the main story of the film kicks in, Nix has been the mayor of Tomorrowland for many years, and he's become rotten, corrupt. Athena, unchanged since Frank was a young man, plays a key role in the film, and the hero is a girl named Casey who has a quick scientific mind that becomes important as the story unfolds. Nix is a guy who values technical accomplishment over creative thinking, and when he throws Frank out of Tomorrowland, he's not alone. Every creative thinker is banished, allowing Nix to focus purely on aesthetics and technical advancement for its own sake.

There's interdimensional travel, human-looking robots, and a quest for revenge on the part of Frank. He is a bitter adult, and the film is not just about Casey's adventure, but also about Frank rediscovering the kid he used to be. It sounds like young Frank actually plays a decent-sized role in the film, so we may see both timelines play out to some extent.

So… if this is in fact a description of "Tomorrowland," what do you think? And before you respond, try not to compare this to the Jim Hill story, which was based on nothing but speculation. It is patently unfair to say, "Well, I thought it was better when it was about UFOs," because it has never been about UFOs. Even so, I'm curious to see how many people get upset because suddenly this is about something totally different than they originally thought. . . .

Drew McWeeny, Hitfix, March 3


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Opening 12/12/14.

Which pushes 1906 out to .. what, 2017 at the earliest?

Which means that if there were ever to be an Incredibles sequel, we couldn't hope for it until some time in the 2020s.

Sigh. My 6yo will be a teenager by then. And my 9yo will be driving.


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's an app for Tomorrowland.

 

 

For months, ever since Disney revealed that its upcoming, epic sci-fi saga would be called Tomorrowland, the studio has teased fans with the contents of an archived box containing a hodgepodge of mysterious items.

On Saturday at D23, Disney’s Comic-Con-like fan gathering, director Brad Bird and screenwriter Damon Lindelof opened it before thousands of onlookers.
The filmmakers unveiled an app that allows everyone to explore the box on its own, and try their hand at unraveling its mysteries. It’s meant to mimic a museum presentation, with audio commentary (narrated by Jensen) and analysis  of its various hidden messages.

 


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The little dance at the 43-second mark is very much like what a Pixar character would do.

 

So, on the one hand, Brad Bird (yay!). And, on the other hand, Damon Lindelof (boo!). Hmmm.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got flashes of Jupiter Ascending in there, though this seems more grounded. I'm surprised they're suddenly showing so much of the plot, too.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'm not sure what to make a Memorial Day Weekend opening. A big moviegoing weekend, sure, but hasn't it been home to the lesser titles in recent years -- the movies that make a quick summer buck but fade early? I realize the "summer movie season" actually starts earlier than Memorial Day Weekend, but I think that, as a holiday-weekend launching point, Memorial Day Weekend releases have done a relatively quick burn. Calling PTC...


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...