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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1


Peter T Chattaway
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How is Katniss, asked, expected or allowed to "lead," though? I liked the moment in the hospital as she faces up to her celebrity, and the camera capturing her fury at Snow. Other than that, though, she's on a short leash pretty much all the time.

 

 

Isn't that part of the point? I appreciate this series' bleak view of "the power of one": the way that a brave soul can stand up and inspire the oppressed, only to be quickly exploited, burdened with impossible expectations, disallowed the freedom to be human, and employed like a character in someone else's carefully managed campaign.

 

I'm with you on the dam-bombing. But in scenes like the quick tangential plunges into Katniss-free conflict, like the forest scene, I think the abruptness of them makes sense: We share, with Katness, a kind of unsettling distance from the large-scale violence being carried out in her name. I think if the movie expanded its scope to build up these events, we'd have to get to know a lot more characters and spend much more time away from Katniss and Gael and the other lead characters, who barely get enough attention as it is. The first couple of films were about Katniss taking her stand; now we're into watching her stomach the ripple effects. It may not be engaging as a hero story, but I think stories like this that consider the consequences of superhero-type endeavors are sorely lacking in this season of the comic-book saturation of cinema.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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SDG wrote:

: Oh, and speaking of the hydroelectric dam. An attack on a single site brings down all the power in the Capitol? Really? That kind of cartoonish simplicity I'm willing to accept in a Star Wars movie, but I expected something closer to plausibility here.

 

Oh, right, thanks for the reminder: I couldn't believe the Capitol didn't have any sort of back-up power source.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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SDG wrote:

: Oh, and speaking of the hydroelectric dam. An attack on a single site brings down all the power in the Capitol? Really? That kind of cartoonish simplicity I'm willing to accept in a Star Wars movie, but I expected something closer to plausibility here.

 

Oh, right, thanks for the reminder: I couldn't believe the Capitol didn't have any sort of back-up power source.

Really? Doesn't President Snow imply that restoring power was much easier than the rebels realized. He knew that six of them were in the city, and it seemed like Snow allowed the rebels to think that taking out the dam did more damage to the capitol than it did as an attempt to lure them into his trap.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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SDG wrote:

: Oh, and speaking of the hydroelectric dam. An attack on a single site brings down all the power in the Capitol? Really? That kind of cartoonish simplicity I'm willing to accept in a Star Wars movie, but I expected something closer to plausibility here.

 

Oh, right, thanks for the reminder: I couldn't believe the Capitol didn't have any sort of back-up power source.

Really? Doesn't President Snow imply that restoring power was much easier than the rebels realized. He knew that six of them were in the city, and it seemed like Snow allowed the rebels to think that taking out the dam did more damage to the capitol than it did as an attempt to lure them into his trap.

The city goes black, and stays that way at least for hours. Not remotely realistic given the kind of infrastructure capabilities the Capitol clearly has.

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

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But that's it: He immediately makes the "counter-moves" statement. He would have to keep the whole thing dark to make the ruse work and bait the heroes in farther and farther. The film doesn't come right out and say he's doing that, but I assumed it. 

 

Now, it *is* unrealistic that it would all go down in the first place, yes. It's the "staying down for hours" that makes sense to me.

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Overstreet wrote:
: Now, it *is* unrealistic that it would all go down in the first place, yes. It's the "staying down for hours" that makes sense to me.

 

Neither one of those things make sense. President Coin and her cronies should have been suspicious that it stayed down for so long. (I mean, at the very least, there'd be aircraft guarding the borders, right? *They* have alternate power sources -- batteries etc. -- even if the city doesn't.)

 

Remember how Princess Leia said "they're tracking us" because that was "the only explanation for the ease of our escape"? I was *really* surprised that no one in Coin's team said anything like that when the Capitol *let their team go*.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Okay, I can buy that.

 

Then again I have a hard time getting too nitpicky about these plot points in a series about a kingdom that pits its poor against one another to the death for sport. As with Snowpiercer, there's a lot about the initial premise that has me saying "Really?" before I get down to things like the logistics of power outages.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Well, if it's logistics you want, a colleague and I were also discussing how we didn't quite understand how the Capitol could depend on all these different districts for its resources and *then* go around utterly, wantonly destroying individual districts as punishments for this or that offense. I mean, without those districts, *where will it get its resources*!? I mean, there, we're not just talking about "realism", we're talking about the story's own *internal logic*.

 

Mind you, I'm also the kind of viewer who, when watching a film like this, sees the moon in a shot and wonders if any of the characters here have ever thought about the possibility of sending rockets up there... or if they even remember that mankind did walk on the moon at one point... or if this even takes place in the future of our world to begin with.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 2 months later...

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Deleted scene of Peeta and President Snow.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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