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Justin Hanvey

The World's End (2013)

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SO HAPPY!!!!

I'm re-watching Spaced this month, and I cheered when a certain supporting cast member showed up behind the bar here.

And Rosamund Pike too? This has the makings of a top-tenner.

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It does look like a lot of fun, doesn't it.

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The premise is a bit different than what I had imagined, but man, that looks wonderful. I rarely go to the theater these days, but I'll make a point to see this one.

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So... anybody have any questions for Pegg, Frost, or Wright? :)

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So... anybody have any questions for Pegg, Frost, or Wright? smile.png

Is Ant-Man ever coming out?

What about a Spaced reunion? You know, with special guest Doctor Who. (Seriously, though, have Pegg & Frost even been asked to write a Doctor Who episode?)

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Is Ant-Man ever coming out?

What about a Spaced reunion? You know, with special guest Doctor Who. (Seriously, though, have Pegg & Frost even been asked to write a Doctor Who episode?)

I don't think so... but Pegg starred in a Doctor Who episode.

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I'll be seeing this tonight, with Wright, Pegg, and Frost showing up afterwards for a Q&A. The occasion: the first Alamo Drafthouse for the DFW area is opening next month, and this is their first big event. They've had a few parking lot screenings, but this is the first movie they'll have shown inside the theater. I'm pretty excited. Even though Alamo originates from Texas, I've never been to one. And of course, there's the special Q&A to be pumped about. Writing about it for the Dallas Observer.

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Beginning next week at my favorite theatre....

NewBeverly_zps6a6c3227.jpg

 

 

We are super stoked to announce that Edgar Wright will be returning to the New Bev on August 9-22 for a festival of films leading up to the release of his new film, The World's End!!

 

You'll know more when I know more.

Edited by John Drew

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Beginning next week at my favorite theatre....

NewBeverly_zps6a6c3227.jpg

 

 

We are super stoked to announce that Edgar Wright will be returning to the New Bev on August 9-22 for a festival of films leading up to the release of his new film, The World's End!!

 

 

 

And the line up includes.....

 

 

12 Steps To Annihilation

I’ve curated three seasons of ‘The Wright Stuff’ at LA’s fabulous New Beverly Cinema since 2007, showing both my favourite films and, occasionally, classics I’ve never seen.

Now, to get you in the mood for the North American release of ‘The World’s End’ on Aug 23rd, I have put together 12 stepping stones to our new movie. The films are all great and all wildly diverse, but you will see some of the seeds of their influence in our new movie.

Starting this Friday, here’s my ‘The World’s End Is Nigh’ season. I won’t be able to be present at all of these movies, but I can vouch that all of these doubles will be solid gold. Enjoy!

 

“One Crazy Night”

Fri-Sat, Aug 9-10: Book Soon!

after_hours_ver2-195x300.jpgAFTER HOURS

1985, USA, 97 min.

Directed by Martin Scorsese

Written by Joseph Minion

Starring Griffin Dunne, Rosanna Arquette, Teri Garr, John Heard,

Catherine O’Hara, Linda Fiorentino, Verna Bloom, Tommy Chong,

Cheech Marin, Will Patton, Dick Miller

Fri: 7:30 pm; Sat: 3:00 & 7:30 pm & into_the_night-193x300.jpg

INTO THE NIGHT

1985, USA, 115 min.

Directed by John Landis

Written by Ron Koslow

Starring Jeff Goldblum, Michelle Pfeiffer, Dan Aykroyd,

Bruce McGill, David Bowie, Richard Farnsworth, Vera Miles,

Irene Papas, Clu Gulager, Kathryn Harrold, John Landis

Fri: 9:35 pm; Sat: 5:00 & 9:35 pm

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

I’m especially fond of the all-in-one-night movie and here are two cult classics of the sub genre that were both released in 1985. Scorcese’s ‘After Hours’ is better known than John Landis’ excellent ‘Into The Night’ but they both feature classic quirky leads in Griffin Dunne and Jeff Goldblum, along with incredible supporting casts. A dream double bill.

“Rock & Roll All Nite”

Sun-Mon, Aug 11-12: Book Soon!

american_graffiti_ver1-197x300.jpgAMERICAN GRAFFITI

1973, USA, 112 min.

Directed by George Lucas

Written by George Lucas and Gloria Katz & Willard Huyck

Starring Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Paul Le Mat,

Charles Martin Smith, Cindy Williams, Candy Clark,

Mackenzie Phillips, Wolfman Jack, Bo Hopkins,

Harrison Ford, Suzanne Somers

Sun: 2:50 & 7:30 pm; Mon: 7:30 pm & dazed_and_confused_ver2-202x300.jpgDAZED AND CONFUSED

1993, USA, 102 min.

Written and directed by Richard Linklater

Starring Jason London, Rory Cochrane,

Wiley Wiggins, Adam Goldberg,

Matthew McConaughey, Parker Posey,

Milla Jovovich, Ben Affleck

Sun: 5:10 & 9:50 pm; Mon: 9:50 pm

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Two more all nighters in the form of George Lucas nostalgic look at ’62 and Linklater’s buzzy 70′s time capsule. The 1990 opening of ‘The World’s End’ was designed as a potted version of such rites of passage movies, so I can’t think of a better youthful double bill.

“We Are The Robots”

Tue-Wed, Aug 13-14: Book Soon!

westworld_ver2-195x300.jpgWESTWORLD

1973, USA, 88 min.

Written and directed by Michael Crichton

Starring Yul Brynner, Richard Benjamin, James Brolin,

Norman Bartold, Alan Oppenheimer, Victoria Shaw,

Dick Van Patten, Steve Franken

7:30 pm & terminator_ver2-210x300.jpgTHE TERMINATOR

1984, USA/UK, 107 min.

Directed by James Cameron

Written by James Cameron and Gale Anne Hurd

Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Michael Biehn,

Linda Hamilton, Paul Winfield, Lance Henriksen

9:25 pm

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Two terrifying robotic performances in the unstoppable forms of Yul Brynner and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Michael Crichton’s future nightmare still feels extremely plausible and James Cameron’s breakthrough remains one of his very best films. I showed clips of both of these movies to the young actors playing the villains of our movie and they responded with terrifying dead eyed zeal.

“They’re Here Already!”

Thu-Fri, Aug 15-16: Book Soon!

invasion_of_the_body_snatchers-196x300.jINVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS

1978, USA, 115 min.

Directed by Philip Kaufman

Screenplay by W.D. Richter; based on Jack Finney’s novel

Starring Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams, Jeff Goldblum,

Veronica Cartwright, Leonard Nimoy, Art Hindle,

Lelia Goldoni, Kevin McCarthy

7:30 pm & dead_and_buried-197x300.jpgDEAD & BURIED

1981, USA, 94 min.

Directed by Gary Sherman

Screenplay by Ronald Shusett & Dan O’Bannon

Story by Jeff Millar & Alex Stern

Starring James Farentino, Melody Anderson,

Jack Albertson, Dennis Redfield, Nancy Locke, Robert Englund

9:50 pm

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

The most paranoid double bill you’ll see this year. Philip Kaufman’s 1978 San Francisco masterpiece is one of the best remakes of them all and has been a massive influence on both ‘Shaun’ & ‘World’s End’. Gary Sherman’s nightmarish horror has, in New England fishing town Potter’s Bluff, a locale that is a creepy cousin to our Newtown Haven. Be prepared to never trust anyone ever again.

“Friends Reunited”

Sat, Aug 17: Book Soon!

Its-Always-Fair-Weather-Poster-194x300.jIT’S ALWAYS FAIR WEATHER

1955, USA, 101 min.

Directed by Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly

Story and screenplay by Betty Comden and Adolph Green

Starring Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey, Cyd Charisse, Dolores Gray,

Michael Kidd, David Burns, Jay C. Flippen

3:00 & 7:30 pm & big_chill_ver1-190x300.jpgTHE BIG CHILL

1983, USA, 105 min.

Directed by Lawrence Kasdan

Written by Lawrence Kasdan & Barbara Benedek

Starring Tom Berenger, Glenn Close, Jeff Goldblum,

William Hurt, Kevin Kline, Mary Kay Place, Meg Tilly,

JoBeth Williams

5:00 & 9:35 pm

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

These two films are the only features we watched prior to writing the first draft of ‘The World’s End’. One is the startlingly bittersweet Gene Kelly musical reuniting war time buddies in a New York bar ten years after WWII. The latter is the baby boomer classic by Lawrence Kasdan which brings old friends together after a friend’s suicide. Simon Pegg and I would joke that our new film would be like ‘The Big Chill’ if the dead pal was present at his own wake. Both are great, funny and sometimes dark movies.

“Happy End Of The World”

Sun-Tue, Aug 18-20: Book Soon!

last_night-208x300.jpgLAST NIGHT

1998, Canada/France, 95 min.

Written and directed by Don McKellar

Starring Don McKellar, Sandra Oh, Roberta Maxwell,

Robin Gammell, Sarah Polley, David Cronenberg

Sun: 3:10 & 7:30 pm; Mon & Tue: 7:30 pm & mad_max_two_the_road_warrior-194x300.jpgTHE ROAD WARRIOR

1981, Australia, 95 min.

Directed by George Miller

Screenplay by Terry Hayes & George Miller & Brian Hannant

Starring Mel Gibson, Bruce Spence, Michael Preston,

Max Phipps, Vernon Wells, Emil Minty, Virginia Hey

Sun: 5:10 & 9:30 pm; Mon & Tue: 9:30 pm

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Two brilliant future shocks; one pre and one post apocalypse. Don McKellar’s quiet masterpiece is a criminally under-seen film about the last night on Earth. It’s been ripped off a whole lot, including by me. George Miller’s incredible second Mad Max instalment is rightly one of the most sci fi genre’s most influential design classics. A must see double.

“Thrills, Pills & Bellyaches”

Wed-Thu, Aug 21-22: Book Soon!

withnail-and-i-movie-poster-1987-1020244WITHNAIL & I

1987, UK, 107 min.

Written and directed by Bruce Robinson

Starring Richard E. Grant, Paul McGann, Richard Griffiths,

Ralph Brown. Michael Elphick

7:30 pm & twenty_four_hour_party_people-201x300.jp24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE

2002, UK, 117 min.

Directed by Michael Winterbottom

Written by Frank Cottrell Boyce

Starring Steve Coogan, John Thomas, Paul Popplewell,

Lennie James, Shirley Henderson, Paddy Considine, Andy Serkis

9:45 pm

To end the season a double whammy of British hedonism. Richard E Grant gives the finest drunk performance in all cinema (and from a tee totaller too) and Michael Winterbottom’s Madchester opus chronicles the coke and ecstasy laden saga of Factory Records. The former influenced our film in it’s whirlwind of a lead, so much so that some have called our new movie ‘Withnail And I-Robot’. And the music the latter is frequently at the heart of ‘The World’s End’.

See one, see them all. Cheers!

Edited by John Drew

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Heh. Combining Westworld (a story about a theme park that breaks down and attacks the customers, written by Michael Crichton) and The Terminator (robotics by Stan Winston), whaddayaget? Jurassic Park!

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I wonder if any of these "all in one night" movies at The Beverly tell us on which night it's all happening?  

 

Terminator does, of course.  "What day is it? The date?" "Twelfth. May. Thursday."

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Ron Reed wrote:

: I wonder if any of these "all in one night" movies at The Beverly tell us on which night it's all happening?  

: Terminator does, of course.  "What day is it? The date?" "Twelfth. May. Thursday."

Which, incidentally, is an impossibility. (That May 12 1984 was a Thursday, that is.) Which is odd, given that the movie was *shot* around that time.

(Oh, and The Terminator begins and ends on different nights; there's at least one period of daylight between those two points.)

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io9: How The World's End rejects 'drunken, misogynistic' manchild films.

 

 

The World's End feels as though it's deliberately resisting the tropes of both the "midlife crisis binge-drinking film" like The Hangover, as well as science fiction comedies like The Watch or whatever. Were there times when you came close to doing something and then pulled back and decided to do something different?

 

Pegg: It's more like a celebration of stuff...

 

Wright: I think what we wanted to do, actually... Like both of those films you mentioned, there's a lot of those "manchild" films. I don't think they really scratch beneath the surface that much. And a lot of those films glorify that behavior. Whether it's something like Old School. Or Hall Pass. Those "midlife crisis" sort of films. But in this, we wanted to do something where, the fact that they want to go back is a cautionary tale. This is going to have a bad ending if they try to recapture their glory years. It's not a triumphant quest.

 

Pegg: A lot of the "manchild" films sort of say, "[Adulthood means] conforming, but the best thing to do is to be a kid, and hang out with your guy friends. And be sort of drunken and misogynistic." And what we're kind of saying is, "Conforming isn't necessarily the right thing to do, but nor is that."

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This makes me even more intrigued.  I can't wait to see this film.

Edited by Attica

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Opening day.
 
Reason to celebrate.
 
Um...
 
Where is everybody?
 

It will no doubt strike many as odd that what I claim as the year's most virtuosic and consistently entertaining movie comedy also happens to be an action-packed tribute to a very British strain of anachronistic science fiction. It may seem odder too that I claim this self-same movie boasts the most delightfully literary script of any that's unspooled across a cinema screen this year. But the exquisite execution of such unusual entertainment feats happens to be the specialty of director and writer Edgar Wright, who, here reunited with his frequent leading man and co-writer Simon Pegg, presents the most delightfully and sensibly eccentric mainstream picture I've seen in some time, "The World's End."


 
Scott Renshaw at Salt Lake City Weekly:
 

...more summer adventures need to be this gloriously, intelligently, affectionately, hilariously bonkers.

 
Josh Larsen at Larsen On Film:
 

For a comedy, The World’s End has some of the year’s best action sequences.

 
Mike D'Angelo at Las Vegas Weekly:
 

... [it] quickly becomes apparent to our heroes that there’s something slightly off about their hometown. If you don’t yet know what that entails, try to avoid finding out — just trust that Wright and Pegg (who co-wrote the script) achieve the same level of pop-culture hilarity as in their previous films, abetted in this case by a superb ensemble cast. (Paddy Considine and Eddie Marsan, who usually play intense dramatic roles, both turn out to have a flair for broad comedy.) You both can and can’t go home again, this movie insists, but the reasons why you can’t are stranger than you imagine.

 
Matt Singer at The Dissolve:
 

Coming at the end of a summer at the movies that’s been apocalyptic in both theme and quality, The World’s End feels timely and refreshing. Wright and Pegg’s edge over their competition is the way they put spectacle in service of character, instead of the other way around. Nothing in their films happens just because it looks cool (although hot damn, it often does look cool, too). Everything is motivated by the story they’re telling and the ideas they’re expressing—in this case, a cautionary tale about how nostalgia can be more dangerous than body-snatchers.

 
Matt Zoller Seitz at RogerEbert.com:
 

If "The World's End" were only a picture about childhood buddies on a bittersweet pub crawl, it might have still been some sort of minor classic, so sharply observed is every shot, cut, music cue, line and close-up. When the film takes a right turn into science fiction conspiracy thriller territory—invoking "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" as well as such Carpenter films as "The Fog" and "Prince of Darkness"—you might worry that it's about to succumb to Gary's biggest fear, and trade spiky if heedless individuality for a tiresome grab at commercial formula. (This is the third Wright film in which a dull and harmless small town plays proves a hotbed of slowly-creeping and highly secretive horror.) No worries: the sci-fi elements—which were hinted at in trailers, but which I'll write around in this review and maybe revisit later in a spoiler-warning-bedecked blog post—are audaciously funny and inventively designed, and they're always tied to the film's concerns. Nothing, no matter how extravagant or surreal, is superfluous.

...

... in an era in which mainstream movies not only lack rhythm but seem to have forgotten how to dance, this one's briskness is inspiring. Its judgment is nearly unerring, and it has a sense of joy that's rare. Like most genre films, "The World's End" is working things through in an extremely broad way and having a grand time doing it, and its self-deprecating wit inoculates it against self-importance. The movie wears its themes on its sleeve and pins its symbols to its puffed-out rooster's chest, swaggers about with a proud grin jabbing thumbs at itself, then walks into an open manhole. It's magnificent.

 

Edited by Overstreet

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Um...

 

Where is everybody?

 

 

Talking about Batman. What else are we supposed to do? We're movie lovers, after all.

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The World's End has a lot in common with This is The End; beyond the title, they're both apocalyptic comedies about old friends who have trouble reconnecting. In This is The End, Jay Baruchel has fallen out of touch with old pal Seth Rogen because he doesn't like the Hollywood lifestyle, while Simon Pegg in The World's End feels left behind by his friends because they've moved on and grown up, while he hasn't. Baruchel's normalcy isolates him from the group, while Pegg's eccentricity and immaturity isolate him.

 

I thought This is The End had more big laughs, but The World's End is stronger in pretty much every other way. The biggest edge it has is in pacing; the "hiding in James Franco's house" section of This is The End goes on for a long time, and feels like it, too, because it's a static environment, while the "Golden Mile" structure of The World's End keeps things moving. The chemistry in The World's End was better, too, which is kind of odd, since the actors in This is The End are friends in real life and they're playing versions of themselves.

 

The climax of The World's End (i.e. once Bill Nighy starts talking ) was a letdown for me. For one, it felt like the movie gave up and stopped, rather than following its story all the way through, but more than that, the way it

validates Pegg's apathy and immaturity--he saves the world by pointing out how many people are just like him--seems at odds with the theme of "growing up is a good and necessary thing" that the movie had been building up to that point.

Edited by Tyler

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Opening day.

Reason to celebrate.

Um...

Where is everybody?

Um, it just opened today and not all of us are privy to press screenings.

Rest assured this is my most anticipated film of the summer's back half. Hoping to catch it on Sunday.

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Opening day.

Reason to celebrate.

Um...

Where is everybody?

Um, it just opened today and not all of us are privy to press screenings.

 

 

Yikes, didn't realize my note would actually sound seriously confrontational. I'm just excited. And bored senseless with Batfleck talk. I thought maybe somebody might have seen it by now, or attended a press screening. But... oh, never mind.

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Jeffrey, I'm delighted to report that I saw the film tonight -- my wife's choice! yay! -- and, having read next to nothing about it and knowing not at all what to expect, was completely bowled over by the film! I had thought I would be watching a decent buddy movie with a standout performance -- some good laughs, but mostly chuckles. And then ... 

 

I've seen Wright's other movies and had thought something might be coming, but had convinced myself a ways into the film that wouldn't be the case.

 

I was wrong. Dead wrong. And I couldn't be happier.

 

It was hard to gauge audience reaction. The

fight scenes -- do I really need to spoiler this? just trying to protect those who, like me, don't want to know much about the film before seeing it

were loud, and I was laughing so hard I could only hear myself and Sarah (she loved it). I can see how people might not go for the film, and therefore rate it two stars, or whatever, But I don't get the 3-star ratings, like Ann Hornaday's in today's Washington Post. It seems to me that if you like this movie at all, you probably love it.

 

I did.

Edited by Christian

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