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Breathing Method


Overstreet
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Because, well... Derrickson was just sitting around, twiddling his thumbs, looking for something to do...

Hot off an $18 million opening weekend gross of Sinisterthat was six times its $3 million budget, Jason Blum’s Blumhouse has teamed with Sinister director and co-writer Scott Derrickson on a screen adaptation of the Stephen King novella Breathing Method.

They’ve secured an option on King’s work from the author, and the script will be written by Scott Teems. They haven’t yet set it for financing.

The novella was part of the 1982 King collection Different Seasons and was the only story in the volume that hasn’t yet been adapted. If focuses on an elderly physician named Dr. Emlyn McCarron who recounts an incident in his career of a patient who was determined to give birth to her illegitimate child, despite her financial difficulties and the social stigma in the 1930s. The patient turns to the doctor because of the book he has written about the Breathing Method, a system to help women through childbirth. She grows close with the doctor, who finds that she is so determined to have the child through the method that she lingers on even after a horrific accident on the way to the hospital.

Scott Teems, as you know, made That Evening Sun.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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My least favorite of the Different Seasons stories, but I'm glad it's being adapted. I'm sure Scott can find a way to make me suspend my disbelief at the story's conclusion. (King couldn't -- and I was like, 15 years old when I read it.)

To this day I cite Different Seasons as my favorite King book.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Wow. Sinister gives the impression of having a lot more than a $3 million budget.

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Incidentally, I just got Different Seasons in the mail today (I'm currently on something of a King 'trip' - reading The Stand and the Dark Tower series simultaneously, planning on reading Under the Dome and Different Seasons soon, etc.).

I look forward to both the King story and the adaptation . . . if it ever happens. Hollywood can be so fickle.

@Timzila

"It is the business of fiction to embody mystery through manners, and mystery is a great embarrassment to the modern mind." (Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners).

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Hollywood's adaptations of King's novels have been hot and cold for me. Of course there are films such as Carrie, the Shining, Cujo, and the Green Mile that I found to be very well made and this to a similar standard as the novels. Others not so much. I'm hoping that Hollywoods new run of Stephen King adaptions will be given the attention to quality that they deserve.

Edit: In this I'm not just talking about Scott as director ect. I'm meaning the studios backing the projects to the extent that it can be made right.

Edited by Attica
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Christian wrote:

: My least favorite of the Different Seasons stories, but I'm glad it's being adapted.

It's been years since I read the book -- which was probably sometime between the releases of the film versions of The Shawshank Redemption and Apt Pupil -- but I remember thinking that this particular story was basically unfilmable. I can't recall if that was due to how short the story was, or to its content. But I do remember thinking it was kind of a shame, just on principle, that the entire book probably wouldn't get filmed some day.

So, kudos to Scott and team for taking the challenge on!

(FWIW, I regard Stand By Me as a classic, The Shawshank Redemption as way over-rated, and Apt Pupil... actually, the only thing I remember about that film is how the writer I assigned to review that one came up with a brilliant line about the teenaged protagonist "swearing like he had practised in front of a mirror".)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Christian wrote:

: My least favorite of the Different Seasons stories, but I'm glad it's being adapted.

It's been years since I read the book -- which was probably sometime between the releases of the film versions of The Shawshank Redemption and Apt Pupil -- but I remember thinking that this particular story was basically unfilmable. I can't recall if that was due to how short the story was, or to its content. But I do remember thinking it was kind of a shame, just on principle, that the entire book probably wouldn't get filmed some day.

So, kudos to Scott and team for taking the challenge on!

(FWIW, I regard Stand By Me as a classic, The Shawshank Redemption as way over-rated, and Apt Pupil... actually, the only thing I remember about that film is how the writer I assigned to review that one came up with a brilliant line about the teenaged protagonist "swearing like he had practised in front of a mirror".)

Blasphemy!

The Shawshank Redemption is one of the best American films of all time, bar none.

@Timzila

"It is the business of fiction to embody mystery through manners, and mystery is a great embarrassment to the modern mind." (Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners).

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(FWIW, I regard Stand By Me as a classic, The Shawshank Redemption as way over-rated, and Apt Pupil... actually, the only thing I remember about that film is how the writer I assigned to review that one came up with a brilliant line about the teenaged protagonist "swearing like he had practised in front of a mirror".)

Blasphemy!

The Shawshank Redemption is one of the best American films of all time, bar none.

I'm with Peter. Way over-rated. I don't even rank it among best American films of the decade.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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I saw The Shawshank Redemption once and liked it. I saw it again and enjoyed its finer points even more. But then the cracks started to show. And, as with The Green Mile, I couldn't even make it through that third viewing. I've come across it from time to time on television and can enjoy a few minutes here and there, but no. It's not even in my top 25 of 1994 anymore.

We've got a long discussion about it archived somewhere, IIRC. Ah, yes... here.

(And wow, that's one of those threads that desperately needs reformatting, as so many quotes are now misformatted and hard to separate from the replies they prompted.)

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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I have this book (along with tons of other Stephen King books) at home to read. I'll get to it after I finish the two Bradbury ones I'm reading...(and someday I need to finish Love in the Ruins, Percy is just kind of a mind workout, needed a rest).

"The truth is you're the weak, and I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin Ringo, I'm tryin real hard to be the shepherd." Pulp Fiction

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I'm always hesitant with news of a King adaption...because they can go oh so wrong...but I feel a bit more hopeful with the folks involved here.

Oddly, I read the story, but it has been long enough, I only recall vague aspects of the story...I cannot even remember how it ended.

Edited by Nezpop

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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Christian wrote:

: My least favorite of the Different Seasons stories, but I'm glad it's being adapted.

It's been years since I read the book -- which was probably sometime between the releases of the film versions of The Shawshank Redemption and Apt Pupil -- but I remember thinking that this particular story was basically unfilmable. I can't recall if that was due to how short the story was, or to its content. But I do remember thinking it was kind of a shame, just on principle, that the entire book probably wouldn't get filmed some day.

So, kudos to Scott and team for taking the challenge on!

(FWIW, I regard Stand By Me as a classic, The Shawshank Redemption as way over-rated, and Apt Pupil... actually, the only thing I remember about that film is how the writer I assigned to review that one came up with a brilliant line about the teenaged protagonist "swearing like he had practised in front of a mirror".)

Agree with Peter across the board here. My interest in the project is based on Scott Teems take on the material - he found a rather ingenious way to adapt the material into a movie, without abandoning what is good about the material.

I'm always hesitant with news of a King adaption...because they can go oh so wrong...

Isn't this true of any good author who has had many of their stories adapted?

In eternity this world will be Troy, I believe, and all that has passed here will be the epic of the universe, the ballad they sing in the streets. -- Gilead, by Marilynne Robinson

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I'm always hesitant with news of a King adaption...because they can go oh so wrong...

Isn't this true of any good author who has had many of their stories adapted?

Yeah... But King seems really hard for some to figure out. I think the short story/novellas tend work out better for film because his novels are so packed with details interesting and enlightening story points get lost. I look at the Shining...which I think is brilliant as a Kubrick film...but the minute I think of it in comparison to the book... Jack Torrence is a tragic figure... He is a guy trying to fix his life and be good...seduced by his demons...Wendy was not mousy...she was strong and able to stand up to Jack. You should want Jack to overcome his monsters... And the movie lacks that. Nicholson's Jack Torrence is not a good guy falling apart...he is pretty much crazy at the start...his lack of warmth for his family makes it not surprising that he could go homicidal.

"You know...not EVERY story has to be interesting." -Gibby

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I'd think the trick to understanding King's work is that there is a blend of sophistication and raw pulpiness. It might be hard to find that balance.

Also King's books tend to have strong first and second acts with a weaker climax and resolution. Maybe not weak as much as not very climatic. I'm sure that's also hard to translate into film.

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Nothing even close to the neighborhood of "hate" here. Disillusionment? Frustration? Boredom? Yes.

Same here. No hate. I don't begrudge anyone liking it. I just can't believe that some consider it one of the best films ever.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Nothing even close to the neighborhood of "hate" here. Disillusionment? Frustration? Boredom? Yes.

Same here. No hate. I don't begrudge anyone liking it. I just can't believe that some consider it one of the best films ever.

I've only seen it once, so maybe (like others here), it'll show its cracks with another viewing or too.

I thought it was spectacular the first viewing, although I'll take back the "best American films of all time, bar none." comment - that's probably going too far. it's certainly saying too much considering I've only seen it once.

@Timzila

"It is the business of fiction to embody mystery through manners, and mystery is a great embarrassment to the modern mind." (Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners).

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morgan1098 wrote:

: . . . like you, Nezpop, I'm having trouble remembering how "Breathing Method" even ends.

Oddly enough, I think the ending is the only thing about that novella that I *do* remember. (Or maybe it was the *almost* ending, now that I check the novella's Wikipedia page... it mentions an epilogue that I don't remember...)

I'm sure any screen adaptation will have to be somewhat loose and "creative", and that's okay. Just promise me, Scott, that you're not going to use that "wise old man gets killed 15 minutes before the end" Stephen-King-movie cliche that we talked about way back when. smile.png

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Are there still plans for the remake of Two Eyes Staring with Charlize Theron? I read today about some filming delays for Mad Max: Fury Road, and wondered if scheduling for TES might have been compromised, and Breathing Method put in its place.

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
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  • 1 month later...

It took me a minute to remember Scott Teems wrote That Evening Sun....honestly that is one of my most favorite movies, so I am now a lot more excited about this adaptation. And a bit jealous of Derrickson for getting to work with Teems.

"The truth is you're the weak, and I'm the tyranny of evil men. But I'm tryin Ringo, I'm tryin real hard to be the shepherd." Pulp Fiction

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