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Caught it tonight, since it might be leaving town soon.

 

*Loved* the visual-effects sequences inside the microchips.

 

I actually thought it was interesting how the video-camera work got particularly shoddy during some of the fight scenes -- almost as though Mann didn't want us to revel in the violence all that much.

 

That being said, what was *up* with that procession near the end, where all the participants seem to be ignoring the violence in their midst until finally it gets to be Too Much To Ignore!?

 

And I was semi-amused -- given recent discussions of another film's predictable moment of stillness-breaking violence -- that there was a moment in *this* film where I found myself thinking, "Okay, everything's becoming a bit too tidy, everyone's come to an understanding now, so it must be time for someone to get killed out of the blue," and then, sure enough, within a few seconds, WHAMMO! Admittedly, both the victim and the method by which the victim was killed were different than what I expected, but still.

 

Oh, and I also like the way Mann lingers on certain people -- returns to them, even -- after they've been mortally wounded, or even after they've died. I'm not sure it's deep or anything, but it's a nice change from all the other action/crime movies that seem all too willing to just move on to the next thing after someone dies.

 

Edited to add: I just read vjmorton's review, and appreciated his note about the sound quality. It was actually quite startling, for me, to see how *muted* this movie was from its opening frames, compared to the deep bass of the Beyonce song that accompanied the Fifty Shades of Grey trailer beforehand. Clearly the sound system in that theatre was *capable* of something more than this movie was giving.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I actually thought it was interesting how the video-camera work got particularly shoddy during some of the fight scenes -- almost as though Mann didn't want us to revel in the violence all that much.

 

Yes, this is by far Mann's most violent, sorrowful film.

 

That being said, what was *up* with that procession near the end, where all the participants seem to be ignoring the violence in their midst until finally it gets to be Too Much To Ignore!?

 

I'm still reeling from the pure dread of this sequence, which feels in a lot of ways like Mann is confronting the amorality of his standard heroes' outlook on life. They walk against the uniform, drone-like crowd because they are the elite Mann men; they can even speak over the din without shouting, as though they have a private radio channel between them. Everything is stripped down to the essence of these men and their selfish desires (for vengeance, for money, for pride's sake) competing amid the clueless masses. What's missing is the appreciation of cool professionalism (as others have pointed out, Hathaway reverts to rough skills he learned in prison). The existential weight of being a Mann man has finally worn the cool factor to the bone, and all that's left is sorrow and fatigue. This is no place for Eno cues.

 

Edited to add: I just read vjmorton's review, and appreciated his note about the sound quality. It was actually quite startling, for me, to see how *muted* this movie was from its opening frames, compared to the deep bass of the Beyonce song that accompanied the Fifty Shades of Grey trailer beforehand. Clearly the sound system in that theatre was *capable* of something more than this movie was giving.

 

It's an incredibly bizarre sound mix. It seems balanced to keep the gun battles just on the edge of blisteringly loud without becoming deafening.

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Roger Friedman:

 

Universal has yanked Michael Mann’s “Blackhat” basically from all but 236 theaters. It had been in 2,568. It’s the 6th biggest drop in history for a third week film.

 

Wow, that *is* sudden.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 year later...

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