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Peter T Chattaway

Spider-Man: Homecoming

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Links to our threads on Spider-Man 2 (2004), Spider-Man 3 (2007), The Amazing Spider-Man (2012), The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014), Captain America: Civil War (2016) and the in-development films about The Sinister Six, Venom and Aunt May.

Links to our threads on the original Spider-Man (2002) at the old Novogate discussion board:

Two more sequels coming in 2016 and 2018.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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Whoops. The Amazing Spider-Man 3 has now been pushed back two whole years, to 2018, to make room for The Sinister Six in 2016. And the studio is no longer talking about The Amazing Spider-Man 4.

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Spider-Man will be part of the MCU.

 

 

Sony Pictures Entertainment and Marvel Studios announced today that Sony is bringing Marvel into the amazing world of Spider-Man. 

 

Under the deal, the new Spider-Man will first appear in a Marvel film from Marvel's Cinematic Universe (MCU). Sony Pictures will thereafter release the next installment of its $4 billion Spider-Man franchise, on July 28, 2017, in a film that will be co-produced by Kevin Feige and his expert team at Marvel and Amy Pascal, who oversaw the franchise launch for the studio 13 years ago. Together, they will collaborate on a new creative direction for the web slinger. Sony Pictures will continue to finance, distribute, own and have final creative control of the Spider-Man films.

 

Marvel and Sony Pictures are also exploring opportunities to integrate characters from the MCU into future Spider-Man films.

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Variety:

 

The next step for Sony, of course, is to recast Spider-Man. The studio is looking to go back to Spidey’s roots and put the character back in high school, which would require it to cast a younger actor, Variety has learned. Andrew Garfield is no longer playing the character.

 

The Hollywood Reporter:

 

The studio is currently looking for an actor much younger than 31-year-old Andrew Garfield, who most recently portrayed the superhero, as well as a writer for its reboot.

 

In addition to Garfield finding himself on the outside of the franchise, director Marc Webb will not be back to complete a third Spider-Man (the studio originally envisioned its Amazing Spider-Man oeuvre as a trilogy with Webb and Garfield aboard for all three).

 

I must admit, the completist in me *is* a little sad that we'll never see the entire trilogy play out. Especially given how the first two films went out of their way to set things up for later films.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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Latino Review:

 

- No new origin story, Spidey exists from the beginning, taken as a given

 

- New actor, probably an unknown, he will be specifically based in High School and they want him to be able to grow up into the role.  The thought being if this works, Spidey can do multiple trilogies for years ala Harry Potter.

 

- A major part of the first film will involve Spider- Man fighting Iron Man and then trying to pass the “audition” to join the Avengers

 

- The first film will involved the Sinister Six coming together with the thought to later maybe spin them off.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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Mike Fleming @ Deadline.com:

 

There are all kinds of rumors raging about the wall crawler, including that Feige and his producing accomplice Amy Pascal are planning an arc that will tell the Spidey story over three to four movies, each covering a year of high school for Peter Parker, who’ll already have been bitten by the radioactive spider so we don’t have to see that all over again. The tone they are searching for in the coming of age tale is John Hughes humor and emotion, plus all the superhero stuff.

 

So... if these movies come out every two to three years... and each movie covers a single year of high school... and this series is part of MCU continuity... does this mean two or three years of "real" time go by for every year of MCU time?

 

Meanwhile, in other news: '“Spider Man” Actor Andrew Garfield Got Himself Fired from Series by Insulting Sony Chief'.

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Tom Holland

 

Marvel and Sony Pictures, and producers Kevin Feige and Amy Pascal conducted an extensive search for both the actor and the director. The studios and producers were impressed by Holland’s performances in “The Impossible,” “Wolf Hall,” and the upcoming “In the Heart of the Sea,” and by a series of complex screen tests. Following Marvel’s tradition of working with the brightest next wave of directors, Watts also went through multiple meetings with Feige, Pascal, and the studio, before winning the job.

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So two out of three big-screen Spider-Men will have been played by Brits, then.

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Oh, that suggestion makes me feel really, really old.

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Some interesting stats, based on the fact that Tomei is 50 while Tom Holland is 19:

 

In Sam Raimi's original Spider-Man movie, Aunt May was played by Rosemary Harris, who was 75 at time of the release, 48 years older than leading man Tobey Maguire. When Andrew Garfield took over as at the wall-crawling superhero in 2012, he was 28 years old, while the second Aunt May, Sally Field, was 66 — a age difference of 38 years.

 

Now, with Tomei and Holland, that difference is down to 32 years, with Tomei the youngest Aunt May by far. Given the casting, it's likely that Marvel and Sony aren't looking to the wizened crone of series creators Stan Lee and Steve Ditko's initial stories —but, instead, the far younger, far more active May Parker that writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Mark Bagley offered up in the 2000 comic book reboot Ultimate Spider-Man.

 

Interestingly, if the new Spider-Man had been *another* actor in his mid- to late 20s (rather than a teenager like Holland), the gap in age between Marisa Tomei and the Spider-Man actor would have been even *smaller*.

 

This reference to "the far younger, far more active May Parker" of the Ultimate Spider-Man series may or may not also help to explain why Sony was developing a movie about Aunt May at one point.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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Even in the Ultimate universe, she has white hair. And it's still kind of wrong. 

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New title, comes out July 7 2017.

Does "Homecoming" refer to anything in the comics, or is it just a meta-reference to the fact that Spider-Man is now back in the MCU where he belongs?

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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The new logo seems cartoonish. Spider-Man-Homecoming-Movie-2017-Logo.jp

Edited by Tyler

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Guest-starring Tony Stark. This will be the third non-Iron Man / non-Avengers movie that Tony Stark appears in, following The Incredible Hulk and Captain America: Civil War.

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To quote what I wrote at Facebook:

Subtext: Sony abandoned its The Amazing Spiderman franchise after two movies and begged Disney-owned Marvel for a deal: If Sony let Disney-Marvel use the Spider-Man character, could some of the Disney-owned characters appear in the stand-alone Spider-Man movies? And so we have this: a movie in which Tony Stark a.k.a. Iron Man, the most popular character in the Disney-Marvel world, is literally a mentor to the brand new Spider-Man in his first stand-alone movie. Kind of like how Disney-Marvel is lending its expertise to Sony.

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I don't know how telling it is, but to me the most interesting stuff in this trailer (as well as in the international one) is whatever doesn't involve Spider-Man. I really like avuncular Tony Stark and really don't care about the Revenge of the Birdman.

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I suppose they are based on already existing characters, but Peter's friend and new love interest are characters we haven't seen in previous films.

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Just now, winter shaker said:

I suppose they are based on already existing characters, but Peter's friend and new love interest are characters we haven't seen in previous films.

I thought the love interest was supposed to be Mary Jane?

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For what it's worth, I posted that video essay to my Facebook page a while ago, and someone replied by linking to this:

- - -

The 'Why Do Marvel's Movies Look Kind of Ugly?' Video is Flat Wrong—Here's Why
At the end of Patrick (H) Willems' video below, he invites users to respond if they think he's being too much of a nitpicky nerd. That's not the problem with the video, though; it's that he's not being nerdy enough, completely missing major points about color grading and even contradicting himself in the video. . . .
Somewhere around 2010, things started to get "flat." Everywhere. This wasn't happening just in Marvel movies and music videos, but fashion editorial spreads, car ads, almost everywhere that you saw commercial images. Maybe it was driven by Instagram, or maybe Instagram was a response to it, but tastes changed. Marvel's imagery changed along with it. Not everybody goes with the trend (Refn, among many others, has different goals), but it's not surprising to see color grading for a major, mass-appeal movie series to reflect the current taste in grading. 
An argument is made that most music videos look the same because the filmmakers don't want to take the time to fix them—to overcome the mental bias of how flat the dailies look—but to say that everyone leaves Alexa "flat" just because it's easier is unreasonable; this video itself proves that literally five seconds of tweaks can add more "crunch" and "pop" to an image. Is every single music video director, DP, and colorist too unsophisticated, or too lazy, to do that?  The simpler explanation is that it's just what "now" looks like. It's a look that, when we look back at these movies from 2050 will make it seem very millennial, the same way that when we watch a 70s movie with too much diffusion we can immediately identify when it was made. . . .
Charles Haine, No Film School, November 23

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