kenmorefield

A better film about...

111 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, Evan C said:

I saw Manchester as a story about flawed characters who suffer a lot of hardships due to misfortune, but their own flaws exacerbate those hardships. While most Baumbach films aren't nearly as grief-centered as Manchester, he excels at flawed yet sympathetic protagonists who make their lives even harder than they need to be, and that applies to most of his filmography, which is why I was thinking of Baumbach through most of Manchester.

I definitely see that theme in Baumbach's films, but I didn't see Manchester as much about suffering hardships as about navigating grief, if those experiences can somehow be distinguished. The grieving process for Lee's character--or lack of process, as he seems resolutely stuck in a Kubler-Ross moratorium--doesn't seem like a parallel to, say, Frances or Greenberg or Brooke, because of the nature of the suffering. Self-inflicted suffering due to lack of vocational understanding or middle-class ennui is very different from grieving the loss of family member through unexpected death (though the divorce in The Squid and the Whale comes close, as it's the prolonged death of a marriage). It seems strange, even unfitting, to compare the depth of suffering, but I find the hardships of Frances to be dissimilar from the hardships of Lee, despite both films being about (as you said) characters whose flaws exacerbate their painful circumstances. But I now see where you're going with your statement.

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15 hours ago, Joel Mayward said:

I definitely see that theme in Baumbach's films, but I didn't see Manchester as much about suffering hardships as about navigating grief, if those experiences can somehow be distinguished. The grieving process for Lee's character--or lack of process, as he seems resolutely stuck in a Kubler-Ross moratorium--doesn't seem like a parallel to, say, Frances or Greenberg or Brooke, because of the nature of the suffering. Self-inflicted suffering due to lack of vocational understanding or middle-class ennui is very different from grieving the loss of family member through unexpected death (though the divorce in The Squid and the Whale comes close, as it's the prolonged death of a marriage). It seems strange, even unfitting, to compare the depth of suffering, but I find the hardships of Frances to be dissimilar from the hardships of Lee, despite both films being about (as you said) characters whose flaws exacerbate their painful circumstances. But I now see where you're going with your statement.

That distinction is fair, and I realize that the degree of hardships is not comparable between Manchester and most of Baumbach, which is why I cited those two specifically.

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Secret of the Kells is a better version of Moana.

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Arrival is a better version of The Day the Earth Stood Still (and I liked the original Day)

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Siddharth is a better version of Lion, which is itself a way better version of Finding Dory.

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Guns of Navarone is a better version of Rogue One.

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17 minutes ago, kenmorefield said:

Guns of Navarone is a better version of Rogue One.

Yes.

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3 hours ago, NBooth said:

Yes.

 

But....

Rogue One is a better version of Force 10 from Navarone.  ;)

Edited by John Drew

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On 12/25/2016 at 1:56 PM, kenmorefield said:

Siddharth is a better version of Lion, which is itself a way better version of Finding Dory.

Haven't seen Siddharth yet, but I actually think Finding Dory is a better version of Lion.

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In that both are films about healing after World Wars and personal betrayals, and both involve music as a crucial plot point, Phoenix is a better version of Frantz.

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The Little Hours is a better version of The Beguiled (well, a least for me a better time at the movies).

edit: Just realized this is the second Sofia Coppola film I've bagged on in this thread.

Edited by John Drew

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