Jump to content

Top 25: Discussion of Nominations for 2014


Recommended Posts

I just nominated Holiday (and I can't believe it took me this long to remember it).  Cary Grant plays a working man who is engaged to a rich, stuffy heiress.  He plans to marry her and take a holiday around the world (he's worked his entire life).  She on the other hand wants him to take a promising job with her father, so he can make even more money.  When he meets her family, it is instantly clear he has much more in common with her vivacious black sheep sister (played by Katharine Hepburn).  The setup is fairly common, but Philip Barry's dialogue is some of the sharpest and funniest (surpasses The Philadelphia Story IMO) and Hepburn and Grant are perfect in their roles.  And the spiritual theme is that money can't buy happiness.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 178
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I nominated Stranger Than Fiction, which has yet to be seconded, but since it is similar in some ways to another nominated (and seconded) film, Ruby Sparks, I will just refer to Lauren Wilford's excellent essay on Ruby Sparks, which notes the strengths of Ruby, but also compares it with Stranger:

 

The comic windup to [Ruby Sparks' key] revelation and the immediate aftershock come off as a lesser attempt at the breezy fantasy realism of 2006′s Stranger Than Fiction, which sold its premise immediately on the back of Will Farrell’s charming, deadpan performance. Ruby Sparks lacks the comedic flair to pull off its setup.

...

Ruby Sparks is a good film, but not a great one. As far as high-concept fantasy romances go, it doesn’t do funny as well as Stranger Than Fiction, and it doesn’t reach the poetic heights of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. The moral is spelled out a bit too clearly. The ending does not follow through on the dark commitment of its climax.

 

On this basis, I'm going to argue that Stranger Than Fiction is a better candidate for "divine comedies." (Eternal Sunlight, of course, is waiting for the 25 "memory" films.)

There is this difference between the growth of some human beings and that of others: in the one case it is a continuous dying, in the other a continuous resurrection. (George MacDonald, The Princess and Curdie)

Isn't narrative structure enough of an ideology for art? (Greg Wright)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought of the Stranger/Sparks comparison too, but I think Sparks is the better of the two (not surprising, since I nominated it). While I enjoy Will Ferrell in Stranger a lot, and would even agree it's more "comedic" than Sparks, it loses points for me because the "great novel" embedded in it just isn't all that good.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites

... it also becomes a profound examination of spiritual themes like loyalty, trust, punishment, and free will ...

... reflections on how moral choices shape how a life is lived ...

... Peter Falk's depiction of love towards his grandson, and teaching him that someday he might feel differently about "kissing stories" ...

... there is a whole storyline about the pursuit of power and how it could affect each character.

I nominated it mainly because of the huge statement that it made about slavery and prejudice in its time, and the impact it had.

Because I remember when I watched it, I found it to be one of the more enjoyable "good hearted comedies" I had seen in quite some time.

... a cleverly witty look at the flaws of political systems (and people, for that matter), with fantastic and smart dialogue ...

Another one that "feels" real about relationships, disappointments and dreams - and what's more spiritual than family, commitment and building trust

The aesthetics of the human face (and hands) matter. It's also ridiculous.

... it touches on some very worthy themes of patriotism and fidelity ...

... it brilliantly satirizes the absurdity of letting paranoia define your decision making as well as highlighting how absurd that paranoia is in the first place ...

I'm still doubting how well we (myself included) are doing in articulating what we mean by spiritual themes. Does discussion of the moral virtues equal discussion of spirituality? Does love of spouse or love of family equal spirituality? What if the film is critical of human folly? Criticizing human folly equals a spiritual viewpoint? What if a main theme of the film is love? That would make it "spiritual"? After all, what theme is more spiritual than love?

Some of the justifications above were written for films I think should/could probably make the list. But I don't like these justifications very much (including my own).

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%?

... I would attempt to foreground those films that literally engage the divine or are explicitly spiritual in subject matter; that is, films that diagetically engage the supernatural (Blithe Spirit, A Matter of Life and Death, The Exterminating Angel), or, at the very least, cleverly suggest some kind of metaphysical presence or design. (In terms of mise-en-scene, Powell & Pressburger's comedies--A Canterbury Tale, I Know Where I'm Going!--accomplish this brilliantly.)

Heaven Can Wait and Groundhog Day seem to me ideal candidates; Gilliam's films often have this elusive quality, too. If Christians are by definition otherworldly ("for here we have no continuing city, but we seek one to come...") then our lists should reflect that reality.

On the other hand, Nathaniel's comment here is one of my favorites so far on this thread.

Wow, I had no idea what y'all had picked for the theme until just now. I can't wait. People have been itching to do a comedy list for quite awhile now, yeah? Glad we finally did it.

I will peruse the list and see if I have any nominations.

Hi Anna! Yes, please do. We can use your ideas and your criticism.
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 I've been meaning to write a rumination on this film for years. You hit exactly on many of the points that stand out to me. The film is a wonderful blend of comedy and tragedy, filth and holiness, the mundane and the miraculous.

 

It's also very stylized - and I think that is what many initially find off-putting (besides the scatological humor). Hartley almost always films his movies in what I would call, for lack of a better term, stage blocking which feels very odd when watching a film that has all the ornamentation of being set in a "real world." But once you get used to that, I've found it usually enhances the films for me.

 

 

I hope that when you do (write a rumination) you'll share it here in a  Henry Fool thread! 

 

"The film is a wonderful blend of comedy and tragedy, filth and holiness, the mundane and the miraculous."

 

Yes. It gave me diamonds in the rough as a metaphor for what it means to be human. Like with the Wordsworth: the pages may unravel and be putrid, but so long as you can make out the words, the Prelude is no less or less itself. Likewise Pearl's innocence and Henry's championing of art and victims. The movie believes in them in spite of the filth of

what's happened to Pearl and of the bribe she offers or of Henry's crime.

And it lets me believe too. The scatalogical elements are the setting for the delicacy with which Hartley treats abuse and hurt and the promise that something stays incorruptible and fresh. This film may be more flawed and off-putting than other nominations - less 'funny' - but for me, it is spiritually very eloquent. 

And on a deceptively lighter note, it's full of running jokes . Like how Simon is always cracking open a beer - he subsists on beer - and I think the one time he tries to drink milk it's spoilt and rancid.

 

"what I would call, for lack of a better term, stage blocking"

 

I think I know what you mean and I remember being aware of it at first and from time to time. The way characters moved could seem theatrical and almost puppet-like.

And then I got used to it, as you say, and it became another element that fit. Because the movie also seems part fable and allegory (Sometimes it reminded me of Edward Scissorhands).  

 

 

J.A.A. Purves (above) 

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%?

 

 

I've also noticed the last point, but I can't seem to come up with foreign comedies that are spiritually meaningful. I will try to write a defense of My Life as a Dog though! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

J.A.A. Purves (above) 

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%?

 

 

I've also noticed the last point, but I can't seem to come up with foreign comedies that are spiritually meaningful. I will try to write a defense of My Life as a Dog though! 

 

I own a number of foreign comedies; but most of them I would have a super hard time finding the spiritual in them.  If anybody could justify nominating "Tampopo", "Bon Voyage", heck, even "The Pink Panther Strikes Again,"  I would hope to second the nomination.

Edited by Nick Alexander

Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed the lack of foreignness a few days ago and looked at a few other lists for possibilities, but the only ones that stood out to me were The Taste of Tea and The Band's Visit. Roy Andersson (Songs from the Second Floor; You, The Living) might deserve some nominations, but I don't recall his movies well enough stump for them.

It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
Twitter Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites

J.A.A. Purves said:

 

:What if the film is critical of human folly? Criticizing human folly equals a spiritual viewpoint?

 

 

Then there's room for Dumb and Dumber .   smile.png           My take on this though is that you have a good point.  A lot of what we are nominating probably isn't close enough to having good spiritual themes.  I see this part of the process as throwing out ideas for consideration, as part of learning what's out there and what we are looking for.  It'll get weeded out later on.

 

 

Josie said:

 

:I've also noticed the last point, but I can't seem to come up with foreign comedies that are spiritually meaningful.

 

 

You folks need to check out God is Brazilian (IMHO).  It really is a good fit and hasn't been seconded yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been more of a lurker than active participant in recent months, but I'll go ahead and advocate for a few of my favorites:

 

Good Morning:  It's not Ozu's greatest film, but definitely the lightest of his late films and genuinely a comedy.  The intergenerational and neighborly conflict is quite playful, not to mention the abundant bodily function humor; yet it still manages to touch on all of the classic Ozu themes, if in a minor key:  facing death and meaninglessness, (again) intergenerational tension, responses to advancing technology, language spoken and unspoken.  Lesser Ozu is still vastly superior to 99.95% of all other films ever made...

 

Mr. Hulot's Holiday:  I know that Playtime and Mon Oncle score more points from a formal standpoint, but with the formal advancement of each subsequent film, the charm, humor, and sheer fun drops by half, if not by an order of magnitude.  And most if not all of the key themes of the Hulot films are present in #1:  the soullessness and empty busyness of modernity, the need to simply and innocently connect in the midst of change.

 

Thank You for Smoking:  Stylishly inventive, funny from start to finish, with engaging characters.  Plus, its satirical view of American politics, media, and what passes for intelligent debate is spot-on.

 

The Big Lebowski:  This one gets my biggest push.  I'm all for the less-recognized Coen Bros' films (I'm especially partial to Burn After Reading), but there are multitudinous reasons why there are Lebowski Fests, but no Burnfest, Finkfest, or Hudsucker Fest; not to mention why Paul Schrader (Mr. Transcendent in Cinema) ranks this film #40 in his Film Canon:

- The brilliant dialogue, the best that the Coen Bros have ever written.  So many memorable exchanges, eminently quotable:  "Mark it zero!...Nice marmot...I can get you a toe...Is this your homework, Larry?"

- Sharply drawn, hilarious, endearing characters:  the Dude (of course), Walter, the Stranger, Jesus Quintana, Jackie Treehorn, Maude, etc.

- Terrific sense of place, with its L.A. setting

- Marvelously framed visuals:  Check out the execution of the 'Mark it zero' scene - it's perfect.  Have bowling alleys ever looked so lovely or transcendent, as they do in the opening and closing scenes?

- The skewering of male American archetypes running through the entire film:  we've got a hippie, a cowboy, a Vietnam vet, sendups of film noir detectives, a wimpy president ("This aggression will not stand"), porn stars, a Hollywood executive, etc.  And of course, Jeffrey Lebowski (not the Dude, the other one), whose pompous posturing and pontificating about what makes a man is shown to be utterly bogus.  I'll take the bond between the Dude and Walter over the Big Lebowski's hollowness any day. 

- The notion of life's evanescence (made evident by the verse from the Psalms on display in the mausoleum where the Dude and Walter collect Donnie's ashes), made bearable by the meaningful connections we make with other absurdly flawed human beings.

To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still doubting how well we (myself included) are doing in articulating what we mean by spiritual themes. Does discussion of the moral virtues equal discussion of spirituality? Does love of spouse or love of family equal spirituality? What if the film is critical of human folly? Criticizing human folly equals a spiritual viewpoint? What if a main theme of the film is love? That would make it "spiritual"? After all, what theme is more spiritual than love?

This is a tough question for me, because I agree with both sides.  You could answer "yes" to all of those questions, because there is some degree of spirituality about all of those things.  But if we do that, then the list starts to become almost non-distinguishable from a top 25 Comedies list, and then the list loses a lot of its interest for me.  For the most part, I think the majority of the nominees (that I've seen) have had something spiritual about them.  But I do agree that some of the nominees (which might include some of mine) are not the best fits for the list, and our definitions of "divine" seem to run the gamut.

 

Maybe the best solution (for myself, no one else has to adopt it) is to support comedies that clearly remind us of the divine, and our defenses should focus on how the film in question suggests that there is something beyond this world.  That might be a little too restrictive for me, but that's an idea.  Maybe how we are dependent upon grace and mercy?  I'll have to think on it.

 

Some of the justifications above were written for films I think should/could probably make the list. But I don't like these justifications very much (including my own).

I've been keeping my defenses rather brief. Perhaps it would be better to flesh them out to really explore whether or not a film qualifies as spiritual.

 

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%

I counted 15 non English films out of 149 nominations, or 10.1%. (That was a quick count and I easily could have missed a couple films.)  But is that a problem per se?  Our lists have often been comprised of many non-English films; it would be fine with me if this one were dominated by English titles.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

Link to post
Share on other sites

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%?

This is probably true, but I think it just goes with the territory of doing comedies. Most humor is very, very culturally and/or linguistically specific (far more so than tragedy; any modern reader of Shakespeare can confirm this). We should expect any group of people choosing their favorite comedies to overwhelmingly select ones that reflect cultural milieus similar to their own.

 

That said, one of my nominations was a French film that takes place in Algeria, and it hasn't been seconded, probably because nobody's seen it. I hope I can eventually convince somebody to see it and at least give it a fighting chance.

Edited by Rushmore
Link to post
Share on other sites

Rushmore wrote:

: Most humor is very, very culturally and/or linguistically specific (far more so than tragedy; any modern reader of Shakespeare can confirm this).

Yeah, I was going to make this point too, until I saw that you had already made it.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had thought of that as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still doubting how well we (myself included) are doing in articulating what we mean by spiritual themes. Does discussion of the moral virtues equal discussion of spirituality? Does love of spouse or love of family equal spirituality? What if the film is critical of human folly? Criticizing human folly equals a spiritual viewpoint? What if a main theme of the film is love? That would make it "spiritual"? After all, what theme is more spiritual than love?

Some of the justifications above were written for films I think should/could probably make the list. But I don't like these justifications very much (including my own).

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%?

 

Jeremy, thanks for continuing to push us here. The nomination thread still has a lot more views and posts than the discussion thread does. We still have a good deal of time until the voting, and I'm sure everyone will be voting with their best understanding of "divine comedy" in mind. But I'm very interested in hearing the discussion as it plays out on why XXX is a "divine" comedy. Or a comedy at all.

 

For my own part, I have nominated some films I want to strongly advocate for. I've also nominated some that I want to be part of that discussion whether they wind up on the list or not (I'm looking at you The Jerk, Father of the Bride [1991] and Zoolander - still contemplating nominating Airplane [somebody give me an excuse to do so!]).

 

We need to hash this out...

 

As far as non-English language comedies go, not looking back, I think I only nominated one so far - El Padrecito - and I think I gave a good cursory recommendation for it. It happens to be one I want to advocate for, but others need to see. (ETA: Also Underground, another film I'm happy to advocate for)

 

 

 

 

 I've been meaning to write a rumination on this film for years. You hit exactly on many of the points that stand out to me. The film is a wonderful blend of comedy and tragedy, filth and holiness, the mundane and the miraculous.

 

It's also very stylized - and I think that is what many initially find off-putting (besides the scatological humor). Hartley almost always films his movies in what I would call, for lack of a better term, stage blocking which feels very odd when watching a film that has all the ornamentation of being set in a "real world." But once you get used to that, I've found it usually enhances the films for me.

 

 

I hope that when you do (write a rumination) you'll share it here in a  Henry Fool thread! 

 

"The film is a wonderful blend of comedy and tragedy, filth and holiness, the mundane and the miraculous."

 

Yes. It gave me diamonds in the rough as a metaphor for what it means to be human. Like with the Wordsworth: the pages may unravel and be putrid, but so long as you can make out the words, the Prelude is no less or less itself. Likewise Pearl's innocence and Henry's championing of art and victims. The movie believes in them in spite of the filth of

what's happened to Pearl and of the bribe she offers or of Henry's crime.

And it lets me believe too. The scatalogical elements are the setting for the delicacy with which Hartley treats abuse and hurt and the promise that something stays incorruptible and fresh. This film may be more flawed and off-putting than other nominations - less 'funny' - but for me, it is spiritually very eloquent. 

And on a deceptively lighter note, it's full of running jokes . Like how Simon is always cracking open a beer - he subsists on beer - and I think the one time he tries to drink milk it's spoilt and rancid.

 

"what I would call, for lack of a better term, stage blocking"

 

I think I know what you mean and I remember being aware of it at first and from time to time. The way characters moved could seem theatrical and almost puppet-like.

And then I got used to it, as you say, and it became another element that fit. Because the movie also seems part fable and allegory (Sometimes it reminded me of Edward Scissorhands).  

 

 

J.A.A. Purves (above) 

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%?

 

 

I've also noticed the last point, but I can't seem to come up with foreign comedies that are spiritually meaningful. I will try to write a defense of My Life as a Dog though! 

 

 

Well, we don't have a thread on Henry Fool. We do have one on the disappointing sequel, Fay Grim.

 

To my mind, the term "Divine Comedy" implies humor, spirituality, laughing at the day-to-day "dramas" and rote mendacity of life. And, of course an allusion to history and Dante. There are a few films (and directors) who I think embody these aspects - maybe unexpectedly, or unconventionally, maybe with quirks - and Hal Hartley certainly fits that bill to me. I could probably make an argument for a handful of his films to make this list (and I nominated two with Jeffrey Overstreet a third - although I'll note Hartley's The Book of Life [dealing with Jesus, Satan and the Apocalypse] hasn't shown up yet), but I think Henry Fool is the standout.

 

And great observation about the beer/milk!

Edited by Darryl A. Armstrong

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nobody else has nominated any Jarmusch, and I was hesitant because most of his films skirt the line between comedy, tragedy and drama. But here we go... Broken Flowers is a comedy about something that isn't funny. That it is funny, speaks to the transcendence of laughter and the human condition.

 

Down by Law is, to be grotesque, O Brother, Where Art Thou, without the overtones. And all the better for it. Plus Roberto Benigni and Tom Waits.

 

Apologies to Stranger Than Paradise, Dead Man (the only Western/Drama/Comedy I can think of), and Coffee and Cigarettes.

 

23. Broken Flowers

 

24. Down by Law

 

I'm saving #25 for Airplane! - still waiting for someone to say anything in defense not of an argument or even a second, but for it's nomination. cool.png


I fear my final nomination may go to John Waters if someone doesn't nominate or encourage me to nominate Airplane!.

Edited by Darryl A. Armstrong

"It's a dangerous business going out your front door." -- J.R.R. Tolkien
"I want to believe in art-induced epiphanies." -- Josie
"I would never be dismissive of pop entertainment; it's much too serious a matter for that." -- NBooth

"If apologetics could prove God, I would lose all faith in Him." -- Josie

"What if--just what if--the very act of storytelling is itself redemptive? What if gathering up the scraps and fragments of a disordered life and binding them between the pages of a book in all of their fragmentary disorder is itself a gambit against that disorder?" -- NBooth

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

J.A.A. Purves (above) 

And one more thing, is it just me, or is this list of nominations the most provincial list of nominations we have yet compiled so far. I haven't counted yet, but do the number of our nominated films not in English even reach 5%?

 

 

I've also noticed the last point, but I can't seem to come up with foreign comedies that are spiritually meaningful. I will try to write a defense of My Life as a Dog though! 

 

I own a number of foreign comedies; but most of them I would have a super hard time finding the spiritual in them.  If anybody could justify nominating "Tampopo", "Bon Voyage", heck, even "The Pink Panther Strikes Again,"  I would hope to second the nomination.

 

 

Okay, I'm going to spend some time thinking about whether I can justify nominating TAMPOPO, which is one of the best films I've seen in the past year or so, let alone comedy. I do think that there is something profound (if not especially spiritual) about the film and the way that it transcends its cultural specificity through the idea of food.

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm watching movies I haven't seen before to see if they are worth nominating, so last night Mrs. Schmed and I sat down to watch Clockwise, starring John Cleese. I've since nominated it, because

 

[A] it is a clear fit with the list (it is framed by the singing of the hymn "He Who Would Valiant Be"), and yet it contains no heavy-handed moral. It is concerned with the comic comeuppance of this particular man, and the fact that he is a straight-laced Christian man makes it all the more delicious.

 

upon (only) 12 hours reflection, it seems to me to be brilliantly acted, and generally well-made enough to be worth consideration.

 

(PS It's available from multiple streaming sources. I watched it on Netflix and unfortunately it seemed to change aspect ratios every few seconds, it was quite a distraction. I'm interested to hear if anyone else has a similar or dissimilar experience.)

That's just how eye roll.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I just went ahead and nominated TAMPOPO, since it's the first film I've nominated and I have lots more nominations, so I don't think it is wasted. The more I think about it I think it deserves a spot on a list of greatest comedy films, even "divine comedies." Here is some of my rational.

 

Christianity puts a meal at the centre of our sacramental practices The more I think about it, TAMPOPO is one of the best descriptions of the role of food in culture, of its centrality to human experience, and its role in ritual or sacramental practice. TAMPOPO may be an absurdist "Ramen Western," but it's also one of the very best films about food ever made. I think a good case for its inclusion is that it is a film that is in some ways interested in the "spiritual" or "transcendent" aspect of food. It also points out the absurdity of our obsession with something that links us to both our higher human nature–beauty, ritual, love– as well as baser human appetites. It's very, very funny, yet as I said above, it is extremely culturally specific.

 

Here is a clip of a famous scene of where an old man instructs a younger man (a very young Ken Wantanabe!) on how to properly approach a bowl of ramen noodles:

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anders, you rock.  I would've nom'd Tampopo, but I couldn't find an avenue.  You did it!!

 

Thanks, now let's rally support for it. I'd love to do the write up for it. smile.png

 

If people watch it, even if they aren't persuaded of the film's spiritual value, I think they will really like it.

Edited by Anders

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think any Christopher Guest films have been nominated, in case anyone thinks they should be in the discussion.

 

 

I had thought of his films, but wasn't sure about if they would fit.  Possibly a case could be made for "A Mighty Wind".  The spirituality of music and all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anders, you rock.  I would've nom'd Tampopo, but I couldn't find an avenue.  You did it!!

I had thought of doing the same last week, when I began to fear we didn't have enough international titles on the list (a concern since addressed), but I couldn't remember the film well enough to know whether or not it should be nominated.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

Link to post
Share on other sites

This article came up on my rss feed.  I thought it was quite appropos to this thread.  It might help give proper perspective as to defining those films that best exemplify both Godliness and guffaws.

 

Humor me!

Nick Alexander

Keynote, Worship Leader, Comedian, Parodyist

Host of the Prayer Meeting Podcast - your virtual worship oasis. (Subscribe)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...