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Tyler

2013 Critics' Lists, Awards Lists, MCN, etc.

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Sight & Sound:

 

 

1. The Act of Killing

2. Gravity

3. Blue Is the Warmest Color

4. The Great Beauty

5. Frances Ha

6 (tie). A Touch of Sin

  Upstream Color

8. The Selfish Giant

9 (tie). Norte, The End of History

   Stranger by the Lake

Edited by Tyler

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Pretty excited by John Waters' list:

 

1. Spring Breakers
2. Camile Claudel 1915
3. Abuse Of Weakness
4. Hors Satan
5. After Tiller
6. Hannah Arendt
7. Beyond The Hills
8. Blue Jasmine
9. Blackfish
10. I’m So Excited

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Cahiers du CInema:
 

1. "Stranger By the Lake," Alain Guiraudie
2. "Spring Breakers," Harmony Korine
3. "Blue is the Warmest Color," Abdellatif Kechiche
4. "Gravity," Alfonso Cuaron
5. "A Touch of Sin," Jia Zhang Ke
6. "Lincoln," Steven Spielberg
7. "La Jalousie," Philippe Garrel
8. "Nobody's Daughter Haewon," Hong Sang-soo
9. "You and the Night," Yann Gonzalez
10. "La Bataille de Solferino," Justine Triet

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To be consistent with past years, and for easy searching, could we retitle this thread "2013 Critics' Lists, Awards Lists, MCN, etc.", please?

Oh, by the way, indieWire's posting the New York Film Critic Circle Awards as they come in.

 

Best Film:
"American Hustle"

Best Director:
Steve McQueen, "12 Years a Slave"

Best Screenplay:
Eric Singer & David O. Russell, "American Hustle"

Best Actress:
Cate Blanchett, "Blue Jasmine"

Best Actor:
Robert Redford, "All Is Lost"

Best Supporting Actress:
Jennifer Lawrence, "American Hustle"

 

Best Supporting Actor:
Jared Leto, "Dallas Buyers Club"

Best Cinematography:
Bruno Delbonnel, "Inside Llewyn Davis"

Best Non-fiction Film:
"Stories We Tell," directed by Sarah Polley

Best Foreign Language Film:
"Blue is the Warmest Color," directed by Abdellatif Kechiche

Best Animated Feature:
"The Wind Rises," directed by Hayao Miyazaki

Best First Feature:
"Fruitvale Station," directed by Ryan Coogler

 

Edited by Overstreet

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To be consistent with past years, and for easy searching, could we retitle this thread "2013 Critics' Lists, Awards Lists, MCN, etc.", please?

 

 

Done. I knew we had a standard title, but I couldn't remember what it was.

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The National Board of Review picks... are you ready for this? ... Spike Jonze's Her as Best Picture.

 

Best Film
HER

Best Director
Spike Jonze, HER

Best Actor
Bruce Dern, NEBRASKA

Best Actress
Emma Thompson, SAVING MR. BANKS

Best Supporting Actor
Will Forte, NEBRASKA

Best Supporting Actress
Octavia Spencer, FRUITVALE STATION

Best Original Screenplay
Joel and Ethan Coen, INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

Best Adapted Screenplay
Terence Winter, THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Best Animated Feature
THE WIND RISES

Breakthrough Performance
Michael B. Jordan, FRUITVALE STATION

Breakthrough Performance
Adele Exarchopoulos, BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR

Best Directorial Debut
Ryan Coogler, FRUITVALE STATION

Best Foreign Language Film
THE PAST

Best Documentary
STORIES WE TELL

William K. Everson Film History Award
George Stevens, Jr.

Best Ensemble
PRISONERS

Spotlight Award
Career Collaboration of Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio

NBR Freedom of Expression Award
WADJDA

Creative Innovation in Filmmaking Award
GRAVITY

Top Films
(in alphabetical order)
12 YEARS A SLAVE
FRUITVALE STATION
GRAVITY
INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS
LONE SURVIVOR
NEBRASKA
PRISONERS
SAVING MR BANKS
THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY
THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Top 5 Foreign Language Films
(In Alphabetical Order)
BEYOND THE HILLS
GLORIA
THE GRANDMASTER
A HIGHJACKING
THE HUNT

Top 5 Documentaries
(In Alphabetical Order)
20 FEET FROM STARDOM
THE ACT OF KILLING
AFTER TILLER
CASTING BY
THE SQUARE

Top 10 Independent Films
(In Alphabetical Order)
AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS
DALLAS BUYERS CLUB
IN A WORLD…
MOTHER OF GEORGE
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING
MUD
THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES
SHORT TERM 12
SIGHTSEERS
THE SPECTACULAR NOW

“Spike Jonze is one of the most talented and visionary filmmakers working today,” said Annie Schulhof, NBR President. “In HER, he explores the age-old themes of love and human connection in a completely fresh and innovative way. It is an outstanding achievement that is sure to become a new classic.”

A select group of knowledgeable film enthusiasts and professionals, academics, young filmmakers and students, the National Board of Review viewed over 250 films this year including studio, independent, foreign-language, animated and documentary selections. These screenings were frequently followed by in-depth discussions with filmmakers, directors, actors, producers, and screenwriters. Voting ballots were tabulated by the accounting firm of Lutz & Carr, LLP.

The National Board of Review honors diverse members of the film community at their annual Awards Gala, which also acts as a fundraiser for student grant philanthropy. Hosted by Lara Spencer, this year’s gala will take place on January 7, 2014 at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York City.

 

Edited by Overstreet

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It would be interesting to do a study of group-voting awards like NYFCC and NBR to see if a disproportionate number of their best picture winners are end-of-the-year releases like Her and American Hustle. It would also be interesting to poll the same critics five years later to see if they would reach the same conclusion. Like nearly every film buff in the world, I haven't seen Her or American Hustle yet, so it's very possible they're amazing films, but surely those films have an unfair advantage over films that came out six or ten months ago.

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I was just telling a friend over the weekend that if I saw movie X (let's say it's 7th on my list) yesterday instead of 5 months ago, when I saw movie y (number 5, let's say) and z (#3) in the last three weeks, I wonder if my ranking of movie X would be different.

 

I tend to think that it might be. Yet, some films *do* seem to affect me in such a way that time away from them doesn't diminish how I feel. For instance, I saw The Kid with a Bike during Spring of last year, and it remained my number 1 film for the long haul of the rest of the year.


...which might indicate that once you get past 4 or 5, it's especially a temptation for latest to be greatest?

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It would be interesting to do a study of group-voting awards like NYFCC and NBR to see if a disproportionate number of their best picture winners are end-of-the-year releases like Her and American Hustle. It would also be interesting to poll the same critics five years later to see if they would reach the same conclusion. Like nearly every film buff in the world, I haven't seen Her or American Hustle yet, so it's very possible they're amazing films, but surely those films have an unfair advantage over films that came out six or ten months ago.

 

No kidding. It wasn't that long ago that quite a few critics were hailing Before Midnight as a major awards contender and both of the leads as probable if not definite acting front-runners. Now, the film hardly gets any attention at all. In my opinion, that has everything to do with timing. If Before Midnight opened on Christmas and went wide in January, we might be looking at a surprise "game-changer."

 

Not that I care much. Each year, the "games" of all this do more to spoil my moviegoing pleasure, more to make me wonder how much the competition corrupts the process of making movies in the first place. The two films I love most this year are strong in ways that almost guarantee no one would consider them for awards; their magic is in their subtlety.

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I was just telling a friend over the weekend that if I saw movie X (let's say it's 7th on my list) yesterday instead of 5 months ago, when I saw movie y (number 5, let's say) and z (#3) in the last three weeks, I wonder if my ranking of movie X would be different.

 

Nick, that's one unexpected benefit of the point system I put in place. I now have relatively firm criteria for judging a film immediately after seeing it. At this point, it's been 15 months since my only viewings of Three Sisters and Like Someone in Love, so most of the emotional resonance has long faded. For example, I feel much more strongly about Blue is the Warmest Color than I do about those other two films, even though I think Blue is deeply flawed. But I trust my initial evaluation of the Wang and Kiarostami films, which is why they're both sitting in my top 5 for the year.

Edited by Darren H

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Darren, forgive me if I missed it, but have you written an explanation of that point system?

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That's an excellent system. If I am ever persuaded to begin rating films, I will probably ask you for permission to steal it and to say "I abide by the Darren Hughes System."

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I actually (informally) adopted your point system when I decided to start including Star scores over at Letterboxd, Darren. Of course, it's still two different systems ultimately. My 4-star is inevitably likely to be different from your 4-star--not to mention I feel pretty unqualified to hand out five stars (from a historical perspective, I mean). But I think what you've created is a pretty helpful guide for me to orient my response to a film.

 

I agree with you that it's helpful to give scores/brief reviews to films shortly after I see them (in part, that's why I started doing so on Letterboxd). Yet, I'm finding that there are still some film experiences in which I'm unable to account for a growth or decline of how much I value the film (I mean within, say, 3-7 days after seeing it, for instance). And I think it raises another set of questions (when scoring) about whether a film is especially reliant on the viewer's first experience of it, or whether it's the kind of film which rewards multiple viewings. I try to account for these things, too, though it's not always easy. When I first saw Certified Copy, I *liked* it, and I felt pretty confident that I would grow to love it (I did). So it's interesting to score something like CC after seeing it a first time versus (for me) scoring something like The Prestige which has (again, for me) a more immediate payoff.

Edited by Nick Olson

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The Washington Area Film Critics Association nominations.

 

The winners will be announced Monday morning, while I'm on the road driving to work. I'll find out the winners when I boot up the computer at work.

 

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LA Film Critics:

 

 

Best Picture: Her and Gravity (tie)

Best Director:Alfonso Cuaron, Gravity (Runner-up: Spike Jonze, Her)

Best Actor: Bruce Dern, Nebraska (Runner-up: Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave)

Best Actress: Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine and Adele Exarchopoulos, Blue is the Warmest Color (Tie)

Best Supporting Actor: James Franco, Spring Breakers and Jared Leto, Dallas Buyers Club (Tie)

Best Supporting Actress: Lupita Nyong’o, 12 Years a Slave (Runner-up: June Squibb, Nebraska)

Best Screenplay: Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy & Ethan Hawke, Before Midnight (Runner-up: Spike Jonze, Her)

Best Cinematography: Emmanuel Lubezki, Gravity (Runner-up: Bruno Delbonnel, Inside Llewyn Davis)

Best Editing: Alfonso Cuarón and Mark Sanger, Gravity (Runner-up: Shane Carruth and David Lowery, Upstream Color)

Best Production Design: K.K. Barrett, Her (Runner-up: Jess Gonchor, Inside Llewyn Davis)

Best Feature Animation: Ernest & Celestine; runner-up: The Wind Rises

Best Documentary: Stories We Tell; runner-up: The Act of Killing

Best Music Score: T Bone Burnett, Inside Llewyn Davis; runner-up: Arcade Fire and Owen Pallett, Her

Douglas Edwards Independent/Experimental Film/Video Award: Cabinets Of Wonder: Films and a Performance by Charlotte Pryce

 

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Richard Brody @ New Yorker lists dozens of films in different categories, but here are his top five:

 

1–2 (tie). “The Wolf of Wall Street” (due to embargo until December 17th, silence reigns for now) and “To the Wonder.”

3.
“Like Someone in Love.”

4–5 (tie).
“Computer Chess” and “Upstream Color.”

 

And here are his bottom four:

 

Worst movies (those with the greatest disproportion between the emblazoned ambition and the mediocrity of the result): “Before Midnight,” “The Great Beauty,” and “All Is Lost,” with “Gravity” close behind (or ahead).

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

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