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Oscars 2014 - nominations


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Sorry, didn't have time to start this thread this morning. (I'm not sure why the thread from four years ago is "pinned" and still visible in this forum...)

 

Link to the section of the 2010 thread where discussion of this year's nominations began.

 

Here's the rundown of feature-length nominees, by film, with the films I've seen in bold:

 

10 nominations

  • American Hustle -- Best picture, director (David O. Russell), original screenplay, film editing, actor (Christian Bale), actress (Amy Adams), supporting actor (Bradley Cooper), supporting actress (Jennifer Lawrence), production design, costume design
  • Gravity -- Best picture, director (Alfonso Cuaron), cinematography, film editing, actress (Sandra Bullock), production design, original score, sound editing, sound mixing, visual effects

9 nominations

  • 12 Years a Slave -- Best picture, director (Steve McQueen), adapted screenplay, film editing, actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor), supporting actor (Michael Fassbender), supporting actress (Lupita Nyong'o), production design, costume design

6 nominations

  • Captain Phillips -- Best picture, adapted screenplay, film editing, supporting actor (Barkhad Abdi), sound editing, sound mixing
  • Dallas Buyers Club -- Best picture, original screenplay, film editing, actor (Matthew McConaughey), supporting actor (Jared Leto), makeup and hairstyling
  • Nebraska -- Best picture, director (Alexander Payne), original screenplay, cinematography, actor (Bruce Dern), supporting actress (June Squibb)

5 nominations

  • Her -- Best picture, original screenplay, production design, original score, original song
  • The Wolf of Wall Street -- Best picture, director (Martin Scorsese), adapted screenplay, actor (Leonardo DiCaprio), supporting actor (Jonah Hill)

4 nominations

  • Philomena -- Best picture, adapted screenplay, actress (Judi Dench), original score

3 nominations

  • Blue Jasmine -- Original screenplay, actress (Cate Blanchett), supporting actress (Sally Hawkins)
  • The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug -- Sound editing, sound mixing, visual effects

     

    2 nominations

     

  • August: Osage County -- Actress (Meryl Streep), supporting actress (Julia Roberts)
  • Despicable Me 2 -- Animated feature, original song
  • Frozen -- Animated feature, original song
  • The Grandmaster -- Cinematography, costume design
  • The Great Gatsby -- Production design, costume design
  • Inside Llewyn Davis -- Cinematography, sound mixing
  • The Lone Ranger -- Makeup and hairstyling, visual effects
  • Lone Survivor -- Sound editing, sound mixing

1 nomination

  • The Act of Killing -- Documentary feature
  • All Is Lost -- Sound editing
  • Alone Yet Not Alone -- Original song
  • Before Midnight -- Adapted screenplay
  • The Book Thief -- Original score
  • The Broken Circle Breakdown -- Foreign language film
  • The Croods -- Animated feature
  • Cutie and the Boxer -- Documentary feature
  • Dirty Wars -- Documentary feature
  • Ernest & Celestine -- Animated feature
  • The Great Beauty -- Foreign language film
  • The Hunt -- Foreign language film
  • The Invisible Woman -- Costume design
  • Iron Man 3 -- Visual effects
  • Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa -- Makeup and hairstyling
  • Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom -- Original song
  • The Missing Picture -- Foreign language film
  • Omar -- Foreign language film
  • Prisoners -- Cinematography
  • Saving Mr Banks -- Original score
  • The Square -- Documentary feature
  • Star Trek into Darkness -- Visual effects
  • 20 Feet from Stardom -- Documentary feature
  • The Wind Rises -- Animated feature

 

A few quick notes:

 

The front-runners for Best Picture appear to be American Hustle and 12 Years a Slave, because those are the only films that have nominations for directing, film editing and screenplay.

 

This marks the second time in as many years that a David O. Russell film has been nominated in all four acting categories, and the 15th time that this has happened in a film by any director. No film has ever *won* all four acting categories, and only two films have ever *lost* all four acting categories (1936's My Man Godfrey and 1950's Sunset Boulevard).

 

It's striking that The Grandmaster was shut out of the foreign-film category when it's the only live-action foreign film that was nominated in any of the other categories.

 

Is Alone Yet Not Alone the first independent Christian film to be nominated for an Oscar?

 

This year's Pixar sequel was snubbed in favour of a couple foreign animated films (Ernest & Celestine and The Wind Rises).

 

Before Midnight is the second film in that series to be nominated for its screenplay; the other film, Before Sunset, lost to Sideways.

 

The second Hobbit film ties with the first Hobbit film for the least nominations of any Peter Jackson-directed Middle-Earth film. An Unexpected Journey lost all three awards, to Life of Pi (visual effects), Les Miserables (makeup and hairstyling) and Lincoln (production design). Notably, The Desolation of Smaug is nominated only for its visual effects and sound mixing/editing. (For the record: The Fellowship of the Ring was nominated for 13 and won 4 (cinematography, makeup, original score, visual effects), The Two Towers was nominated for 6 and won 2 (sound editing, visual effects), and The Return of the King was nominated for 11 and won all 11.)

 

More thoughts later, maybe. I should turn this into a blog post.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Good grief, I hate this board's "creative" re-formatting of my posts sometimes.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Movieguide's predictably restrained and rational look at the Oscar nominations.

 

And their suggestion for an alternative list of Best Picture nominees:

 

 

 

Ultimately, it’s movies like FROZEN, GRAVITY, DESPICABLE ME 2, IRON MAN 3, MAN OF STEEL, BLACK NATIVITY, GRACE UNPLUGGED, THE HOBBIT:  THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG, and 42, which reach audiences with larger-than-life, inspiring messages, that deserve your celebration, acclaim, and entertainment dollars.

 

And fine, I'm a snobbish Brit - but 'entertainment dollars' is one of those All-American phrases I just want to punch on the nose.

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Of course, you can find out what were the truly great movies of 2013 by seeing who MOVIEGUIDE® nominates for its 22nd Annual Faith & Values Awards Gala and Report to the Entertainment Industry, to be held Feb. 7 at the Universal Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles.

I'm speechless.

 

The American public tends to agree with us about all this. The movies listed above that we prefer generally made the most money at the box office.

My only question is: if box office results determine what a good movie is, wouldn't that mean Avatar is the best movie of all time?  It seems they didn't like that.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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I wrote:
: This year's Pixar sequel was snubbed in favour of a couple foreign animated films (Ernest & Celestine and The Wind Rises).

 

Extrapolating from this a bit...

 

The Best Animated Feature category was created in 2002, for films released in 2001, and a Pixar film was one of the first nominees in this category. That film was Monsters Inc., and it lost to Shrek. Since then, every Pixar feature-length film has been nominated in this category *except* for Cars 2, a sequel, and Monsters University, a prequel. (The only other sequel released in this timeframe is Toy Story 3, which was not only nominated but won.)

 

Pixar has released just about one movie every year in that timeframe, however there were no Pixar features in 2002 or 2005 -- but there *were* Pixar *short* films that got nominated in those years! (Mike's New Car, a Monsters Inc. spin-off, in 2002 -- it lost to The Chubbchubbs! -- and One Man Band in 2005, which lost to The Moon and the Son: An Imagined Conversation.) And in 2011, when Cars 2 failed to be nominated for Best Animated Feature, La Luna scored a nomination for Best Animated Short; it lost to The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore.

 

But in 2013, no Pixar films even made the *shortlist* for Best Animated Short (not even The Blue Umbrella). And now they've been shut out of the race for Best Animated Feature.

 

So this marks the first time since 2001 (when films from 2000 were nominated) that Pixar received no nominations whatsoever.

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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More trivia, courtesy of Entertainment Weekly:

 

- American Hustle is the 15th film to receive nods in every acting category. David O. Russell is the first director to helm two movies (back to back, no less) that have both achieved this feat. No movie has ever won all four acting awards, though A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and Network (1976) got three wins apiece. Also worth noting: While quadfectas generally snag at least one acting award, only two (1942′s Mrs. Miniver and 1953′s From Here to Eternity) have ever managed a Best Picture win. . . .

 

- Producer Megan Ellison of Her and American Hustle is the first woman and only the third person ever to snag two Best Picture nominations in the same year. Previous achievers include Francis Ford Coppola for The Conversation and The Godfather Part II (the night’s big winner) in 1974, and Scott Rudin for The Social Network and True Grit in 2010.

 

- If Frozen composer Bobby Lopez wins an Oscar for “Let It Go,” he’ll be the 12th person ever to achieve the prestigious EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony), as well as the youngest person ever to receive all four awards (he turns 39 a week before this year’s ceremony). Lopez picked up Tonys for Avenue Q (Best Original Score) and The Book of Mormon (Best Original Score, Best Book of a Musical) in 2004 and 2011, a Grammy for Book of Mormon‘s original cast recording in 2012, and a pair of Daytime Emmys for his work on Wonder Pets in 2008 and 2010. (Lopez was also nominated for an Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics Primetime Emmy in 2007 for his work on Scrubs‘ musical episode, but he lost the prize to “Dick in a Box” writers Justin Timberlake and the Lonely Island.)

 

- At 23, American Hustle‘s Jennifer Lawrence is the youngest actress ever to land three acting nominations, breaking a record previously held by Teresa Wright (who was 24 when she received her third nod). If Lawrence wins Best Supporting Actress, she’ll become the third actress to win consecutive awards and the youngest person ever to win two acting awards; the current record holder is Luise Rainer, who won Best Actress for The Great Ziegfeld at age 26 and another Best Actress statuette the following year for The Good Earth. (Side note: Rainer was also the first person to win multiple Oscars, the first person to win them in consecutive years, and is still alive and kicking at age 104. Luise Rainer kind of rules.)

 

- Meanwhile, American Hustle star Amy Adams is the only current Best Actress nominee who hasn’t won an Oscar yet — though this is her fifth career nomination (and first Best Actress nod).

 

- At 84, June Squibb would be the oldest-ever Best Supporting Actress winner; at 77, Bruce Dern would be the oldest-ever Best Actor winner. Both are nominated for their work in Nebraska. Previous record holders in these categories are Peggy Ashcroft (age 77), who won for A Passage to India in 1984, and Henry Fonda (age 76), who won for On Golden Pond in 1981.

 

- With her latest Best Actress nod, Meryl Streep breaks her own record for most nominations ever received by an actor. Her grand total: 18. (Underachiever.) With three wins, however, she’s still not the most decorated actor in Oscar history; that’d be Katharine Hepburn, who received four Best Actress statuettes over the course of her career.

 

- The undisputed king of the Oscars, however, has to be composer John Williams, who just received his 49th career nomination (for the score of The Book Thief). He’s got five total wins and more Oscar nominations than any other living person, and is second only to Walt Disney for most Oscar nominations period. (Walt scored just shy of 60 nods, or 59 more than Tom Hanks received for playing him in Saving Mr. Banks.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Everyone's gaga for Spike Jonze as writer-director of Her, but The New York Times notes that he is also involved in at least two other Oscar-nominated films this year: as a producer of Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa and as an actor with a bit part (uncredited?) in The Wolf of Wall Street.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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This race just got interesting. The Screen Actors Guild gave its "ensemble" award to American Hustle... and last night the Producers Guild gave its best-picture award to *both* Gravity and 12 Years a Slave -- the first-ever tie in the guild's history.

 

So the three front-runners for this year's Oscar... are still the three front-runners. Fascinating.

 

(Though Gravity does have the handicap of no screenplay nomination. Then again, as technical achievements that blow audiences away go, there *is* a precedent for a film without a screenplay nomination winning best picture, i.e. Titanic.)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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The Nolan Effect: Why the Larger Best Picture Pool Is Actually Shrinking the Number of Oscar Contenders

Last week, shortly after the nominations were announced, Nick Davis, an associate professor in gender and sexuality studies at Northwestern University who maintains a passionate avocational interest in Oscar history, tweeted a jarring statistic: This year, he noted, the “top six” Oscar categories — picture, director, and the four acting races — comprised a total of just 11 films. I found that number perplexing because it seemed counterintuitive. How could a year that was widely heralded as one of the best in a long time for American movies yield the smallest — the least diverse, if you will — pool of contenders in recent memory? I decided to poke at the stat a bit more by adding in the two writing categories for a “top eight.” Those results were scarcely better: This year’s major-category nominations — 44 in all — were spread among just 12 films. (The only non–Best Picture nominees to receive any major category recognition this year were August: Osage County, Blue Jasmine, and Before Midnight.)

That’s the fewest in 30 years. What’s more, the second-lowest number of films represented in the major nominations in the last 30 years — 14 — happened just one year ago. And the third-lowest also happened in the five years since the rule change. The inescapable truth: Best Picture may have gotten bigger, but the Oscars have gotten smaller. . . .

Mark Harris, Grantland, January 21

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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That Harris article is an eye-opener.

"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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Jared Wheeler noted on Facebook that The Hunger Games: Catching Fire is the first #1 movie (in North America) to not get *any* Oscar nominations in a while. This got me curious about previous #1 films (with the non-nominated films in bold; also, note that Box Office Mojo does not collect yearly worldwide figures before 1989 or yearly domestic figures before 1980)...

 

2013 -- The Hunger Games: Catching Fire in North America (no nominations), Iron Man 3 worldwide (nomination for visual effects)

2012 -- The Avengers (nomination for visual effects)

2011 -- Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (3 nominations for makeup, visual effects, art direction)

2010 -- Toy Story 3 (5 nominations, won 2)

2009 -- Avatar (9 nominations, won 3)

2008 -- The Dark Knight (8 nominations, won 2)

2007 -- Spider-Man 3 in North America (no nominations), Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End worldwide (2 nominations for makeup and visual effects)

2006 -- Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (4 nominations, won 1)

2005 -- Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith in North America (nomination for makeup), Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire worldwide (nominated for art direction)

2004 -- Shrek 2 (2 nominations for song and animated feature)

2003 -- The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (11 nominations, won all 11)

2002 -- Spider-Man in North America (2 nominations for sound and visual effects), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers worldwide (6 nominations, won 2)

2001 -- Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (3 nominations for art direction, costume design and score)

2000 -- How the Grinch Stole Christmas in North America (3 nominations, won 1), Mission: Impossible II worldwide (no nominations)

1999 -- Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace (3 nominations for sound, sound effects and visual effects)

1998 -- Saving Private Ryan in North America (11 nominations, won 5), Armageddon worldwide (4 nominations for sound, sound effects, visual effects and song)

1997 -- Titanic (14 nominations, won 11)

1996 -- Independence Day (2 nominations, won 1)

1995 -- Toy Story in North America (3 nominations for screenplay, song and score), Die Hard with a Vengeance worldwide

1994 -- Forrest Gump in North America (13 nominations, won 6), The Lion King worldwide (4 nominations, won 2)

1993 -- Jurassic Park (3 nominations, won all 3)

1992 -- Aladdin (5 nominations, won 2)

1991 -- Terminator 2: Judgment Day (6 nominations, won 4)

1990 -- Home Alone in North America (2 nominations for song and score), Ghost worldwide (5 nominations, won 2)

1989 -- Batman in North America (1 nomination for art direction), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade worldwide (3 nominations, won 1)

1988 -- Rain Man in North America (8 nominations, won 4)

1987 -- Three Men and a Baby in North America (no nominations)

1986 -- Top Gun in North America (4 nominations, won 1)

1985 -- Back to the Future in North America (4 nominations, won 1)

1984 -- Beverly Hills Cop in North America (nomination for screenplay)

1983 -- Return of the Jedi in North America (4 nominations for art direction, sound, sound effects and score)

1982 -- E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial in North America (9 nominations, won 4)

1981 -- Raiders of the Lost Ark in North America (8 nominations, won 4)

1980 -- The Empire Strikes Back in North America (3 nominations, won 1)

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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  • 1 month later...

Final tally:

 

7 wins:

Gravity -- director, cinematography, film editing, original score, sound editing, sound mixing, visual effects

 

3 wins:

12 Years a Slave -- picture, adapted screenplay, supporting actress (Lupita Nyong'o)

Dallas Buyers Club -- actor (Matthew McConaughey), supporting actor (Jared Leto), makeup and hairstyling

 

2 wins:

Frozen -- animated feature, original song

The Great Gatsby -- production design, costume design

 

1 win:

Blue Jasmine -- actress (Cate Blanchett)

The Great Beauty -- foreign language film

Helium -- live-action short

Her -- original screenplay

The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life -- documentary short

Mr Hublot -- animated short

20 Feet from Stardom -- documentary feature

 

-

 

So when was the last time a film won Best Picture with only *two* other wins, neither of which were for directing? Someone at the A&F chat mentioned that The Godfather won Best Picture along with a screenplay nod and an acting nod in 1973 -- just like 12 Years a Slave did this year -- while the directing award and seven other awards went to Cabaret (but two of those other awards were for acting, whereas Gravity did not win any acting awards).

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Oh, wait, right: Argo also won a mere three Oscars, including best picture (and screenplay and film editing) and *not* including best director (for which it wasn't even nominated). But I think the wealth might have been spread out a little more last year (e.g. Life of Pi won only four awards, including director).

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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So when was the last time a film won Best Picture with only *two* other wins, neither of which were for directing? Someone at the A&F chat mentioned that The Godfather won Best Picture along with a screenplay nod and an acting nod in 1973 -- just like 12 Years a Slave did this year -- while the directing award and seven other awards went to Cabaret (but two of those other awards were for acting, whereas Gravity did not win any acting awards).

 

Crash also was a Best Picture winner with only *two* other wins, excluding director - (Best Editing, and Best Original Screenplay).

Edited by John Drew

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

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