Jump to content

Top 25: Discussion of Nominated Films on Memory


Recommended Posts

While I'm on this painful memories route.  I also nominated Adams Apples, a film which I plugged for the Comedies list and now think would also work great for this list.

 

The film is basically about a clergy man who is living in denial of his past painful memories and has created a false world along with false religious views in order to help sustain this denial.  It's a deeply thoughtful, and possibly theological work.

Edited by Attica
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 135
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

A couple of nominations just posted:

 

The Girl who Leapt Through Time is a movie about memory that doesn't reveal itself as such until the very end--but the protagonist's nigh-obsessive attempts to correct past mistakes strikes me as immensely important to the theme of "memory." 

 

The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya is one I expect will cause more raised eyebrows than solemn nods, but I'll stand by it; continuity-wise, you don't have to see the two regular seasons of the show to "get" it, and it's intimately concerned with the idea of memory. As an alternate-time-line kind of movie, it would have to be, and I'd be a little disappointed if at least one movie of that sort--be it Suzumiya or something else--didn't make it onto the list. These sorts of movies [and tv episodes, but they're not eligible] take their whole motive-force from the fact that things are wrong and must be corrected, and only one person (here, Kyon; on TV, Guinan etc) can remember the way things are supposed to be. It draws in questions of reality, of legitimacy, etc etc etc. And the Suzumiya series--and this movie in particular--is reasonably smart in going about it. It's a genre mashup: magical-schoolgirl-meets-sf--etc etc etc--and so, I expect, not the sort of thing one would expect to be taken seriously as a contender for the list. I do take it seriously--take the whole series seriously, in spite [or because] of its genre roots--or else I wouldn't have nominated it. But as a magical-schoolgirl-meets-sf-etc, it undoubtedly belongs to a "trash" genre. But it's delightfully odd, and very good at what it does.

 

Eve's Bayou--Kasi Lemmons: "Memory is a selection of images...." And it's central to the movie in a couple of ways: it's framed as a memory, and two important scenes are both subject to mis/reinterpretation, depending on how reliable the memories involved are. It's also about remembering history and the ways in which history impinges on the present-day (the dead past is not dead, etc). This is evident in a couple of ways: Eve-the-protagonist is explicitly seen as continuing the matrilineal heritage of the Eve for whom the bayou is named; and the theme of voodoo ties the characters back to a heritage of enslavement and covert rebellion (one definition I've seen of voodoo involves the powerless taking up the only thing left them--death--and converting it into a kind of subversive power). It's also a darned good movie, I think.

 

 

I wanted to nominate Kara no Kyokai: The Garden of Sinners: Paradox Spiral, which deals with memories, identity, and the nature of the soul--but it's simply not available in the U.S. unless one is willing to shell out seven hundred dollars for a blu-ray set. I have no idea what the availability is like in Canada or England--or elsewhere in the West--but I'll bet it's about the same.

Edited by NBooth
Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you all think of the possibility of Shutter island.  We find out that the film is basically based on the main characters denial of his memories because they are too painful for him to live with.

I was planning to nominate it myself once I got home.

 

 

Case for The Page Turner:

 

Like Oldboy and Sweeney Todd*, this is another dark morbid revenge story about a character who obsesses over a wrong committed against her years ago, and allows it to consume her and motivate all her decisions.  I think a list of films about memory needs at least one example of memory being misused to the detriment of the character(s), and this is a well crafted thriller that should be in the running.

 

*Yes, Oldboy has another twist to it which makes it about memory in different ways than Sweeney Todd and The Page Turner, but all three are revenge stories about past wrongs that the characters refuse to forgive.

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ryan, I see you nominated Resnais's film, JE T'AIME, JE T'AIME. I'm dying to see it. How do I go about this? Do you have a copy I can borrow? (You can message me of Facebook, if you like).

"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

Twitter.
Letterboxd.

Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just nominated Red Riding: In the Year of Our Lord 1983. It would have made more sense to nominate the whole trilogy, but since each film has a  different director, I wasn't sure that would fly. Certainly, seeing the first two movies is required to appreciate 1983, so that might be a problem with getting it on to the list. But--like Oldboy and (apparently) Page Turner--it's about dark memories breaking in to the present and causing explosions of violence. The clip I posted has to do with BJ, but all the characters are driven by guilt and dark memories or half-memories, and coming to terms with those [in a surprisingly life-affirming way, considering what's come before] is central to the movie's dynamic.

 

It originated on TV, but it had a theatrical showing stateside, so I think it's in the clear there. Then again, it's really essential to see the whole trilogy to see the beauty of the last film. So there's that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lady Vanishes (1938)

Probably my favourite Hitchcock film, this is the movie that first sprang to mind when I saw the theme, and after thinking about it, I think it fits perfectly.  When the eponymous lady disappears on board a train, her companion, Iris Henderson, is the only person on board the train who remembers that there ever was a lady. Everyone else convinces her that there was no one.  So it asks how we determine our reality – is it from our own memory, or do we trust the memory of others when it contradicts our own? Not to mention that it’s a near perfect thriller and incredibly fun even as these themes run under the surface.

 

 

Stardust Memories (1980)

While not my favourite from Woody Allen, it’s intriguing because it addresses memory from the perspective of a filmmaker.  It’s significant to the List’s theme throughout, as Sandy Bates reflects on his previous movies and life experiences, and compares them to his current ones. It deals with dissatisfaction and the perhaps misplaced romance of the past.  But the connection to music and memory is what makes me appreciate it on a deeper level, especially as a potential movie for the list. The connection with Louis Armstrong’s “Stardust” in a memory with a girlfriend is remembered as a moment of happiness, and how serendipitous happiness can feel sometimes, or at least that’s how we remember it.  Those brief moments of joy that we hang on to in our heads: ”that was long ago, now my consolation / is in the stardust of a song...the memory of loves refrain.”

 

 

Troubled Water (2008)

Two people are haunted by the past – one is trying to move on, but can’t forget what happened, while the other obsesses over her memory and allows it to direct her actions. Does the past define us? Are we really just the sum of our deeds, good and bad, or can we ever be absolved of our sins and be made new? There's also an interesting reflection on why we edit and revise our own memories in order to make ourselves more palatable to ourselves. Troubled Water is steeped in spiritual themes and deeply committed to asking how memory informs guilt and forgiveness.  It’s simply a fantastic film.

 

 

Moon (2009) –*Mild spoilers in my explanation*

Besides being one of the better sci-fi films of the last five years, I think Moon does an admirable job in delving into the ideas of how we define ourselves through our memories. Sam Bell goes through everyday working alone on the moon with the memory of his family sustaining him. But then we find out that he was cloned – and when the first version of him dies, another is awakened, with no memories of how he died, or that he’s a clone, but with the same memories of his time on Earth. It asks how we identify ourselves, if not through our memories. Is all that someone is simply their cumulative memories, and if those are removed, is that person’s soul, or whatever it is that makes them a person, gone  Or if memories are uploaded to someone, do they become a different person, does the core, the very essence of their being change based on imprinted memories?

 

"What's prayer? It's shooting shafts in the dark." -- Frederick Buechner, Godric

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just nominated Ivan's Childhood, which is the only full-length non-documentary Tarkovsky film that has never been on an A&F list. Whatever the reason for that, it seems like an obviously fitting choice. The whole film is built around engaging with the past, whether remembered, dreamed, or imagined. It's Ivan's memories, in which beauty and innocence are swallowed up by darkness and terror, only to emerge anew, that make the film's images of the harsh present profound and tragic rather than merely bleak and depressing.

 

I also nominated Wit, an HBO movie based on a play by Margaret Edson. An English professor specializing in the poetry of John Donne, which, she says, deal with death in "greater depth than any other body of work in the English language," is forced to confront her own mortality more concretely when she is diagnosed with cancer. Her situation prompts her to examine her own life in a new way as she questions what drew her to Donne, and whether Donne's wrestling with the problem of mortality can be of any use to her. It's a profoundly spiritual film and memory is a central theme.

 

Does anyone think Inception should be nominated? It does deal thoughtfully with memory, but there must be at least 25 better choices.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone think Inception should be nominated? It does deal thoughtfully with memory, but there must be at least 25 better choices.

Anders nominated it, and I seconded it, so there are at least two of us who wouldn't mind seeing it included.

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

Link to post
Share on other sites

*Note: Currently, there are no hard-and-fast rules about eligibility based on content - it’s up to YOU to advocate for what you believe fits this category. We believe the community of voters will make a wise decision about it when the times comes. That said, please think carefully about whether the film is really about what the community wants for an "Arts & Faith" list as opposed to a purely generic "top films" list that would be created on some other popular movie website.

I would like to add to this a reflection that some seem to have found helpful.

When we first began making lists, we used the qualifier "Spiritually Significant." That term generated much debate, and that debate continued in our "Divine Comedies" list over the question what made a comedy "divine."

 

However, when I commented in the Divine Comedies: Results thread that "we are a God-haunted community, and we produce God-haunted lists," the adjective "God-haunted" seemed to click for some in a way that terms like "spiritually significant" might not have. 

 

We are certainly interested in films with broadly human themes, profoundly so. Agnostic and skeptic cinephiles (not just those who belong to this community and who voted on this list, but also those who would have no interest in being part of a community like ours) can easily find much to appreciate about our list.

 

But there is no mistaking the fact that, as a community, we approach film specifically from a perspective of what may be called a spiritual or religious orientation — in spite of whatever difficulties we may have defining that, or reconciling it with the sense in which all great art is "transcendent." We are not a community of believers per se, and we are not only interested in religious films, but we are a God-haunted community, and we produce God-haunted lists.

 

This is not, needless to say, an official qualifying requirement. But I would like to propose to each of us, as individuals, that we keep this notion in mind as a point of orientation as we nominate and vote on films. It seems to me that if we lose sight of this and begin producing lists that look just like the lists other communities might produce — if the "God-hauntedness" goes out of our lists — something special will have been lost.

Edited by SDG

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would've nominated Inception as well.  Though the finale drags on about 15 minutes too long, it's still a superbly crafted film - visually, stylistically, and thematically.  The repressive quality of painful memories is definitely a key theme:  Cobb's trapping of Mal, while being trapped by her in turn; young Fischer's sense of being smothered by the memory of his father's disappointment in him.  It definitely belongs on the list, though it would be an embarrassment if it beat out Hiroshima, Mon Amour for the top spot.

 

I nominated Heartbeat Detector last night - as I recall, it's in our Top 100, and I think it deals eloquently with the consequences of the failure of collective memory - how the dehumanizing aspects of Nazism are being replayed in corporate culture, for one thing, which festers and drives to madness at least one of the film's key characters.

 

And I just nominated Kurosawa's Rhapsody in August.  His penultimate film is a lovely one; its lead character is an elderly survivor of Nagasaki who has made her peace with pain and loss (her husband died in the bombing) through community, faith, and passing on her memories and life lessons to her grandchildren.  Great stuff.

Edited by Andrew

To be an artist is never to avert one's eyes.
- Akira Kurosawa

https://www.patheos.com/blogs/secularcinephile/

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is not, needless to say, an official qualifying requirement. But I would like to propose to each of us, as individuals, that we keep this notion in mind as a point of orientation as we nominate and vote on films. It seems to me that if we lose sight of this and begin producing lists that look just like the lists other communities might produce — if the "God-hauntedness" goes out of our lists — something special will have been lost.

Thanks, Steven. While I don't find it to be more helpful than "spiritually significant", I certainly do like it.  And while any way in which we have attempted to describe it has to been too vague to be "an official qualifying requirement," I'd argue that it is what makes Arts & Faith.  If we were to lose this understanding, then I wouldn't be here.

 

On another note, it occurred to me that, technically, every single revenge movie ever made could arguably qualify as a film on memory subject-matter-wise.  We haven't seen too much discussion yet either on how a film qualifies as being a film about memory, or on how memory itself has theological implications.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On another note, it occurred to me that, technically, every single revenge movie ever made could arguably qualify as a film on memory subject-matter-wise.  We haven't seen too much discussion yet either on how a film qualifies as being a film about memory, or on how memory itself has theological implications.

I've wondered about this too, as just about any film that involves significant flashback sequences or the recalling of memories could be considered, though certainly not all flashback films should be included on a list like this.

 

Regarding a more theological discussion, I wish I had time to read Miroslav Volf's The End of Memory: Remembering Rightly in a Violent World, and wonder if anyone here has read it and could offer some insights.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Joel Mayward wrote:
: Regarding a more theological discussion, I wish I had time to read Miroslav Volf's The End of Memory: Remembering Rightly in a Violent World, and wonder if anyone here has read it and could offer some insights.

 

I can't remember if I read that book specifically, but I did read some Volf while preparing my Cornerstone lectures. I should probably post those, huh?

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

*Note: Currently, there are no hard-and-fast rules about eligibility based on content - it’s up to YOU to advocate for what you believe fits this category. We believe the community of voters will make a wise decision about it when the times comes. That said, please think carefully about whether the film is really about what the community wants for an "Arts & Faith" list as opposed to a purely generic "top films" list that would be created on some other popular movie website.

I would like to add to this a reflection that some seem to have found helpful.

When we first began making lists, we used the qualifier "Spiritually Significant." That term generated much debate, and that debate continued in our "Divine Comedies" list over the question what made a comedy "divine."

 

However, when I commented in the Divine Comedies: Results thread that "we are a God-haunted community, and we produce God-haunted lists," the adjective "God-haunted" seemed to click for some in a way that terms like "spiritually significant" might not have. 

 

We are certainly interested in films with broadly human themes, profoundly so. Agnostic and skeptic cinephiles (not just those who belong to this community and who voted on this list, but also those who would have no interest in being part of a community like ours) can easily find much to appreciate about our list.

 

But there is no mistaking the fact that, as a community, we approach film specifically from a perspective of what may be called a spiritual or religious orientation — in spite of whatever difficulties we may have defining that, or reconciling it with the sense in which all great art is "transcendent." We are not a community of believers per se, and we are not only interested in religious films, but we are a God-haunted community, and we produce God-haunted lists.

 

This is not, needless to say, an official qualifying requirement. But I would like to propose to each of us, as individuals, that we keep this notion in mind as a point of orientation as we nominate and vote on films. It seems to me that if we lose sight of this and begin producing lists that look just like the lists other communities might produce — if the "God-hauntedness" goes out of our lists — something special will have been lost.

 

 

Not to beat a hopelessly dead horse, but that's precisely why I nominated RR:1983. It's more true of the novels, of course, but that whole trilogy is haunted by God (or the absence of God, as the case may be), with the identity of the killer being only a small part of that. The Lynchian flourishes suggest hints of transcendence [both as we usually understand it and as a kind of Lovecraftian/Dark Transcendence], and--of course--the imagery of swans' wings stitched onto the victims brings to mind angels: what is the fate of goodness in this world. The ending of the movie is less darkly ironic than the books, in this regard: goodness can survive. It may be battered and traumatized, but it does survive. 

 

That doesn't address any of the objections I pointed out in my post, but it does suggest the ways in which this particular revenge flick interacts with the idea of God-hauntedness.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On another note, it occurred to me that, technically, every single revenge movie ever made could arguably qualify as a film on memory subject-matter-wise.

Yeah, I think there's something to that. That said, some revenge films are more about memory than others.

I nominated Oldboy (which, last I checked, hasn't been seconded) because its revenge narrative eventually falls away and the film becomes wholly concerned with remembering and forgetting past sin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, time to start making cases for my nominations. I'll start with...

 

2046

Wong's nostalgic brand of cinema its pinnacle here. Never has Wong made a more ravishing, fluid, recursive film, which, following after Resnais, attempts to convey a sense of memory through narrative form. Its protagonist's frustrated desire to return to an Edenic state is all-consuming, informing every one of the film's romantic episodes, whether it be his memories or his fictions, which, in 2046, are truthfully one and the same.

Edited by Ryan H.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Joel Mayward wrote:

: Regarding a more theological discussion, I wish I had time to read Miroslav Volf's The End of Memory: Remembering Rightly in a Violent World, and wonder if anyone here has read it and could offer some insights.

 

I can't remember if I read that book specifically, but I did read some Volf while preparing my Cornerstone lectures. I should probably post those, huh?

Yes, please do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've wondered about this too, as just about any film that involves significant flashback sequences or the recalling of memories could be considered, though certainly not all flashback films should be included on a list like this.

Agreed. In keeping with SDG's "God-hauntedness" guideline, I think it would be more fruitful to focus on films that make a concerted effort to formally and thematically engage the subject of memory, and less on those that use it only as a plot mechanic. And within such broad parameters, I'd especially encourage our focus to fall on films that dig into the importance of memory as it relates to and forms identity on personal, communal, and national levels.

 

Specifically to the question of what is "God-hauntedness," and ways in which an Arts & Faith list should interact with arts and faith, I think it would be helpful to approach the candidates with an eye toward the relationship between art and liturgy (and not just high liturgy). Liturgy in the Judeo-Christian sense has always been an effort to worship God in the present while simultaneously both remembering His works in the past and anticipating His works to come. Through this remembrance of past and future, the act of liturgy in every occurrence nurses a renewal of identity as a People/Church, and sense of place within the greater story of God's work. Liturgical art explicitly orients us to enter into this work, as does non-liturgical art in a more remote sense, any time we encounter a work that expresses truth, beauty, and goodness. And as far as non-liturgical art forms go, cinema is uniquely poised to evoke the sense of timelessness that accompanies worship.

 

To me, the films on this list would evoke that liturgical orientation to varying degrees; exploring, exulting in, dissecting, and viscerally expressing the formation of identity through memory. The great films about memory are God-haunted precisely because they wrestle from one degree to another with our status as beings intended for eternity. It's for this reason that I'd personally discount a great film like Casablanca, which, while reliant on memory as a means to advance the plot (Rick must sort through his past to overcome his present conflict), doesn't do a whole lot in bringing us inside the formation of Rick's identity, neither formally or thematically. On a formal level, the contents of his past could be summed up in a short monologue without collapsing the rest of the film, which is concerned less with how his identity is formed as to what he does with it. This isn't nothing, but neither does it distinguish Casablanca above any number of excellent dramas that hinge on flashbacks for context. Contrast that with How Green Was My Valley, which far from using memory as a mere framing device (as it would appear at the start), delves into the formation (or in this case, corruption) of a particular place's identity (and by implication, it's inhabitants, including the narrator). Its apparently simple, linear story is constantly being questioned by the fact that these scenes are being filtered through and ordered by a man's nostalgia for his childhood.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nathan has written exactly the post I would have written earlier today if I hadn't been too busy, down to the specific example of Casablanca. (I wasn't necessarily going to contrast How Green Was My Valley, but I endorse the selection.)

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

Writing at the new Decent Films | Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This is not, needless to say, an official qualifying requirement. But I would like to propose to each of us, as individuals, that we keep this notion in mind as a point of orientation as we nominate and vote on films. It seems to me that if we lose sight of this and begin producing lists that look just like the lists other communities might produce — if the "God-hauntedness" goes out of our lists — something special will have been lost.

Thanks, Steven. While I don't find it to be more helpful than "spiritually significant", I certainly do like it.  And while any way in which we have attempted to describe it has to been too vague to be "an official qualifying requirement," I'd argue that it is what makes Arts & Faith.  If we were to lose this understanding, then I wouldn't be here.

 

On another note, it occurred to me that, technically, every single revenge movie ever made could arguably qualify as a film on memory subject-matter-wise.  We haven't seen too much discussion yet either on how a film qualifies as being a film about memory, or on how memory itself has theological implications.

I realized the other day that any revenge film could be considered to be about memory.  The two revenge films I've nominated both, I think, deal with memory in way that goes beyond a mere plot point.  In The Page Turner, Melanie's (Deborah Francois from L'Enfant) obsession over a single past wrong defines her entire identity and motivates her painstaking revenge.  And avoiding spoilers, I will say that there is a later scene which contrasts the way her life is with the way it was and could have been.

 

After suffering unimaginable horrors from a corrupt Judge with a god-complex, Sweeney Todd decides to play God himself, determining who deserves to live and die, all the while rationalizing his actions by perpetually dwelling on the memory of those horrors, which slowly makes him more and more like the judge.  I can't imagine anyone likes this film as much as I do, but I'm a little sad to see no one has seconded it.

 

 

I nominated Oldboy (which, last I checked, hasn't been seconded) because its revenge narrative eventually falls away and the film becomes wholly concerned with remembering and forgetting past sin.

Even though I have a few problems with Oldboy, I can't deny that it fits the theme of this list perfectly and deals memory in a way that is God-haunted and concerns identity, sin, and anger; and it certainly is a really well crafted film that I wouldn't mind seeing make the list.  So I guess I'll go second it.

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

Link to post
Share on other sites

For Wreck-It Ralph, the entire video game world of Sugar Rush is

under the control of King Candy after he locks away their collective memory, causing the rightful ruler of the kingdom, Vanellope, to become a glitch in the game. Essentially, their memory and identities are entirely intertwined, and Candy's control over their memory is what gives him his power. As soon as the memory is freed by Vanellope's act of crossing the finish line, the Sugar Rush kingdom roles and identities are restored for the better.

Memory--its loss, return, and influence on identity--plays a powerful role in the overarching plot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What the hey. Some version or other of The Glass Menagerie, I should think. Perhaps the one with Hepburn as Amanda. 

 

A stage actor/director/playwright friend of mine directed a very intriguing stage version ... her contention is that MENAGERIE is a "memory play"'; the events we see are all filtered through Tom's memory and certain distortions are inherent in the process. So her production emphasized what she saw as the distortions. Most productions, including all the filmed versions I'm aware of, take a more kitchen-sink realism approach. Still, all three members of the Wingfield family are obsessed with the past in one way or another: Laura's stuck in it, Amanda's trying to relive it, Tom wants to escape it. 


I'm tempted to nominate films that have any kind of framing device, where an aged character looks back on his or her past, e.g., Amadeus or Saving Private Ryan. But that's probably too wide of a net, and in the case of the latter film the framing device comes too close to ruining the whole story. 

Edited by mrmando

Let's Carl the whole thing Orff!

Do you know the deep dark secret of the avatars?

It's big. It's fat. It's Greek.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm tempted to nominate films that have any kind of framing device, where an aged character looks back on his or her past, e.g., Amadeus or Saving Private Ryan. But that's probably too wide of a net, and in the case of the latter film the framing device comes too close to ruining the whole story. 

 

SPOILER GALORE

 

Not to say it shouldn't be nominated, but I (and others) have always had a problem with the framing device used in Saving Private Ryan.  Mainly because Spielberg sets it up the entire film as the flashback of the elderly, unidentified man at the cemetery.  Yet, revealing that man to be Ryan makes no sense, as the first two thirds of the film are not experiences that Ryan had.  The framing device would have been much better had the elderly man at the end been revealed to be Private Reiben, the only soldier from the original squadron to survive the mission.

Edited by John Drew

Formerly Baal_T'shuvah

"Everyone has the right to make an ass out of themselves. You just can't let the world judge you too much." - Maude 
Harold and Maude
 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...