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Steven Spielberg to Direct Roald Dahl Adaptation 'BFG' (Exclusive)
 


Steven Spielberg is attached to direct the adaptation of Roald Dahl's children's book The BFG for DreamWorks.

The live-action film will be based on the fantastical tale of a Big Friendly Giant who befriends a young orphan girl. Dahl's book, illustrated by Quentin Blake, was first published in 1982.
 
DreamWorks acquired the book in 2011 with Kathleen Kennedyand Frank Marshall to produce. Sources say Marshall is still attached to the project. Melissa Mathison, who wrote E.T., was attached to write the script. Various directors have been attached to the project over the years, including John Madden and Chris Columbus.
 
​There has been one other adaptation of the popular children's book: for a 1989 animated made-for-TV movie in the U.K.

Edited by Overstreet

P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Oh, so BFG stands for Big Friendly Giant, not....

 

Beat me to it.

I think that I read this a loooong time ago.


Did George Clinton ever get a permit for the Mothership, or did he get Snoop Dogg to fetch one two decades late?

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I tried to read this to my daughter a few years ago and just had to quit. With so much more biographical info on Dahl out there, the glaring flaws of the book are far more striking than they once seemed to be. In fact, I called a Dahl moratorium across the board after this experience. Too many sharp edges.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

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Michael, can you be more specific? (I must not have read the biographical info that soured you on his work.)


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Dahl is a gifted writer, but congenial he is not. The full extent of his misanthropy is more apparent in his adult fare (Kiss Kiss, Someone Like You). His children's stories can be uncomfortably tense. You can almost feel his temperament as he negotiates between his nastier instincts and the more generous qualities typically associated with children's literature.


"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

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The Treglown biography seems to be accepted as a fair account of his personal and family issues. This this recording piece strikes me as a bit over the top but has some interesting references. I have a hard time in his case coordinating what I see on the page and what is known regarding the way he treated his wife and children. When there are a plethora of children and YA authors out there that present less conflicting contexts from which to direct my kids' literary formation, I just decided to take his books off the spreadsheet I use to track B's reading. 

 

BFG in particular has a few cringey moments early on (which I would need to go back and find) that struck me as off - kind of like that gulp of milk a few days post-expiration.


"...the vivid crossing of borders between film and theology may save the film from the banality of cinema and festival business, and it may also save the church from the deep sleep of the habitual and the always known."

(Hans Werner Dannowski)

Filmwell | Twitter

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Michael, have you considered James Thurber? I haven't read all of his stuff yet, but it seems his children's books (The 13 Clocks, The Wonderful O) contain the bite you might find in Dahl but without the latent cruelty.


"A great film is one that to some degree frees the viewer from this passive stupor and engages him or her in a creative process of viewing. The dynamic must be two-way. The great film not only comes at the viewer, it draws the viewer toward it." -Paul Schrader

Twitter     Letterboxd

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Certainly has some great shots in it.

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Very promising. And yet strangely unsettling how much Rylance is in that CGI character. We've come a long way since Ray Winstone as Beowulf.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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The CGI character also seems to have a bit of that "dead eye look."

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I thought the movie was okay until the Queen got involved. She phones the American President (Ronald Reagan) but never gets in contact with the British Prime Minister (i.e. Margaret Thatcher)? Lost me, the movie did. (And yeah, I hear that at least *part* of that is from the book. But still.)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Meanwhile, on a related note:

 


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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16 hours ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

I thought the movie was okay until the Queen got involved. She phones the American President (Ronald Reagan) but never gets in contact with the British Prime Minister (i.e. Margaret Thatcher)? Lost me, the movie did. (And yeah, I hear that at least *part* of that is from the book. But still.)

It's a goofy fairy tale. I really can't hold details like this against a goofy fairy tale. The story feels like it's told by a child, in a world that works the way children think it does. 

I really appreciate how the sequences with the Queen feel very carefully and patiently composed — especially the Big Breakfast scene. That sequence, as much as any in the film, feels so carefully crafted and choreographed. Who knew I could end up admiring a fart joke as much as I do that scene? 


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

 

"Forget it, Jake. It's Funkytown."    

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Overstreet wrote:
: It's a goofy fairy tale. I really can't hold details like this against a goofy fairy tale. The story feels like it's told by a child, in a world that works the way children think it does. 

I get that a lot of people feel that way, but what can I say, I was 11 years old when the book came out, and I knew even then, I think, that it was the Prime Minister rather than the Queen who tells the military what to do. (This was the same year the Falklands War happened.) I have been told that the joke about Ronald and Nancy Reagan is only in the film, not in the book, so if the film is going to introduce *that* much real-world content into the story...

I get the level that these scenes are *supposed* to work on. And if it were a cartoon I'd probably feel differently. But in its current form... oh well.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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