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Rich Kennedy

So How Was Flickerings/Cornerstone?

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J Robert, where'd you get that shirt in the official photo? it looks like an obscure (?) soccer uniform.


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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J Robert, where'd you get that shirt in the official photo? it looks like an obscure (?) soccer uniform.

It is in fact a Sao Paulo Football Club jersey. A student of mine went to Brazil last year and was nice enough to bring me back a souvenir. I assumed it was completely obscure (I didn't know what SPFC stood for). But in what can only be described as a Cornerstone moment, a guy my age came up to me after my seminar and asked where I'd gotten the jersey. Turns out he was from Brazil, knew all about the soccer club, and gave me an interesting persepctive on Brazilian club football. He assured me that, if I ever travel to Brazil, I should be careful where I wear the shirt. ohmy.gif

I'll just chime in on Cornerstone. It was a fantastic time, as always. But this year was especially rich. Getting to meet old friends and placing faces with names--doesn't get much better than that. For me, the highlight of the fest was the final discussion, for The Wind Will Carry Us. Such a rich discussion of a rich film. I wish I had seen more of Stef von Loy, but he's a popular guy. The DW Murnau story was certainly the funniest part of the weekend.

Huge props have to go to Mike Hertenstein. Flickerings continues to grow in wonderful ways. As I mentioned to Jeffrey O, I don't know how we'll top ourselves next year. But I have no doubt we will. Everyone's presence will be required. I genuinely believe this is fast becoming a necessary "convention" for any Christian film critic interested in more than just thumbs-up-thumbs-down reviewing.

J Robert

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J Bob!! I didn't know you still lurked around here! I would salivate for your film journal

(i read everyone's, every day -- but that doesn't make me a stalker).

But in what can only be described as a Cornerstone moment, a guy my age came up to me after my seminar and asked where I'd gotten the jersey. Turns out he was from Brazil, knew all about the soccer club, and gave me an interesting persepctive on Brazilian club football. He assured me that, if I ever travel to Brazil, I should be careful where I wear the shirt.
Edited by stef

In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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The DW Murnau story was certainly the funniest part of the weekend.

(m) made that up.

-s.

It truly is not made up!


...the kind of film criticism we do. We are talking about life, and more than that the possibility of abundant life." -M.Leary

"Dad, how does she move in mysterious ways?"" -- Jude (my 5-year-old, after listening to Mysterious Ways)

[once upon a time known here as asher]

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Guest Russell Lucas

If I had any photoshop skills, I would have added Murnau standing next to Stef by now.

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No.

-s.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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Really? I looked over there from inside the tent, but I guess I must have missed you all, you must have been hidden behind the golf carts and people standing outside the tent. I should have had a camera, too. smile.gif

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I'm surprised that during the Crossing set, there wasn't the usual dancing in the field outside the tent.  Maybe it was the rain.

There most certainly was dancing outside the tent -- I still have the dust and mud on my sandals to prove it! Not as big as the last time I went (10 years ago), but still about 2 dozen folks, off stage left, outside.

There was definitely dancing. I love watching the joy being experienced by the ones kicking up the dust. There is an innate physical response to music that I believe is experienced by everyone but few express it. Oh the joy and freedom of dance.


...the kind of film criticism we do. We are talking about life, and more than that the possibility of abundant life." -M.Leary

"Dad, how does she move in mysterious ways?"" -- Jude (my 5-year-old, after listening to Mysterious Ways)

[once upon a time known here as asher]

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stef wrote:

: Peter is tall. Very tall. And very handsome in person.

Um, thanks, I think.

DanBuck wrote:

: Peter looks like Keith Green (but taller and a larger noggin).

Um... Just um.

I was amused to see how several people apparently felt the need to confirm with me that I had taken a bus to Cornerstone -- I got the impression that my mode of transportation had become some sort of strange and bizarre bit of gossip. And this was before the people in question had heard the story of how Greyhound screwed up my itinerary! Suffice to say I was sent on a wild goose chase via taxi that ended up taking me right back to where I started, and somewhere in the confusion I lost my CD case and the two-dozen-or-so CDs inside it, and when all was said and done, I ended up leaving Vancouver a good 19 hours later than I was supposed to ... yet I arrived in Peoria only 3 hours later than I was supposed to. Oh, and as a result of the fact that I arrived as late in the day as I did, I missed the Arts & Faith barbecue on July 1. So instead of going to the camp grounds that day, I stayed in my hotel room and worked on my seminars.

My experience at Cornerstone 2004 was a heckuva lot different from my experience at Cornerstone 2000. For one thing, in 2000, I went as a music fan, eager to check out bands like Daniel Amos and Lost Dogs and Over the Rhine and Terry Taylor solo and other acts for the very first time, whereas this year, I kinda regarded my going there as more of a business trip -- and to the extent that I just relaxed and had fun, it was almost all to do with film, not music. In fact, the only band I saw was Lost Dogs; the only other band that interested me was Over the Rhine, but their set didn't start until midnight, and it probably wouldn't have ended until after the shuttles back to Macomb had come to an end, and anyway, I had both a seminar and a film discussion to prepare for the next day, so I needed to get back to my hotel and get some sleep. Another difference is that, in 2000, I was constantly meeting and hanging out with fellow music buffs that I knew from various e-mail discussion lists, but in 2004, I was hanging out almost exclusively with people I know from this board -- I can think of only, like, two people from those music lists that I even MET this year, let alone hung out with to any degree. (I think I spotted a couple more in my audience at the Imaginarium, but they vanished before I had a chance to say 'hi' afterwards.)

I was ultra-nervous about doing the seminars before I arrived at Cornerstone, but I think I grew into them pretty quickly. It helped that, by the third day, I saw people in the audience who I recognized from the first two days, which I took as an affirmation of sorts; glory be, I had found repeat customers. It also helped that I was moving into steadily more profound territory, I think, with each seminar. And it also helped that, by the third day, I had figured out that mike_h was, um, incorrect when he said I only needed to prepare 3,500 words per hour-long seminar -- I think I prepared something closer to 5,000 words for the third seminar, and that's before we take the film clip and the Q&A into account. In the week before Cornerstone, as I was getting my materials ready and stressing over whether I would have enough to say to fill my allotted time, I began to tell people that I was beginning to wonder again if I should have gone into accounting, instead of pursuing something more "creative". But after the seminars were over, I found myself thinking it would be really cool to try something like that again.

The July 3 film discussion around Jesus of Montreal was pretty cool. The fact that the discussion was double-booked with Doug's Bazin seminar actually worked to our advantage, I think, since the discussion was moved to an adjoining room, and everyone who took part in the discussion sat close together, in a circle -- whereas all the other film discussions seemed to consist of people scattered across a sparsely populated screening room, which required the persons leading those discussions to do a lot of walking around so they could pass the microphone to the various speakers. The July 4 film discussion around The Wind Will Carry Us also turned into a nice, cozy, intimate chitchat of sorts, since the Flickerings building was converted into a dance club right after the movie, so jrobert and Doug and Alan and mike_h and a few others all headed to a nearby tent, where we sat in a circle and hashed out the movie until late in the evening.

Meeting all the artsandfaith people was a real treat, and a few of you were more than generous with me. I was especially struck by mike_h's boundless energy and enthusiasm, by his ability to be all things to all people and in all places at all times, and by his voice, which sounded very, very similar to Ron's -- one day I would love to see these two people meet. Alan and I shared many more moments than I would have anticipated, from cuing up DVD clips to attending the Lost Dogs show to one last barbecued meal at a time when I was done with my seminars and wanted nothing more than to just zone out. And Tim and I had a really good chat over dinner -- I think he used the phrase "life issues" to describe what we talked about, which is apt; it wasn't really about film all that much, though of course it's impossible to talk to me for THAT long without film poking up somewhere. I enjoyed meeting everybody else -- Doug, stef, (M)Leary, Russell, etc. -- but the introductions were too brief and I didn't get to see as much of them as I would have liked.

There's probably a lot more I could say, but I'll just finish with this one wierd bit of trivia. Every night in my hotel, I did a bit of channel-surfing, and every night, I inevitably came across something that seemed to connect somehow to what was going on at Cornerstone and/or at my seminars. My first night there, I discovered Dennis Miller's talk show, and he was interviewing evangelical author Jerry Jenkins -- seemed fitting, considering I was about to attend an evangelical festival. My second night there, Dennis Miller was interviewing a member of the supporting cast of 50 First Dates -- which was one of the films I was going to be talking about the next day. My third night there, I came across a clip from Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home -- which I was not planning to talk about, per se, though I did mention Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and Star Trek: Generations in my seminar the next day. But my fourth night there was the strangest coincidence of all. At the last minute, as I was preparing my final seminar, I remembered that a scene from the end of Here Comes Mr. Jordan plugged into what I was going to be talking about that day, so I threw in a paragraph on that film; alas, nobody at the Imaginarium seemed to recognize the film when I mentioned it, though they did seem to recognize the remakes Heaven Can Wait (which I have never seen, starring Warren Beatty) and Down to Earth (which I barely remember, starring Chris Rock). And what film should happen to be on TV at midnight later that night? That's right -- Here Comes Mr. Jordan. Weird weird weird. And I just HAD to watch the first half-hour or so of it again, to make sure I had remembered the story details correctly when I spoke about them earlier that day (and, whew, it turns out I had).

Oh, one other weird bit of trivia. I was sitting in the speakers' hospitality trailer, talking to someone, when out of the corner of my eye I thought I saw Josh McDowell pass by. Like, whoa. Was I sharing backstage access, as it were, with Mr. Evidence That Demands A Verdict himself? Seems so. Bizarre.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Yo, Dawgs.

Nursing a serious Cstone hangover the past few days. Lurking a bit. Delighted to see the conversation continuing and lent a new texture after so many having now met face to face. And what an incredible privilage that was

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Okay... a few Flickerings photos, uploaded one at a time (it doesn't look as though I can put them all in one post). The quality isn't great, as they are just frame grabs from my camcorder.

First is Alan discussing The Last Temptation of Christ, with Russell sharing a moment with Doug C (not pictured) in the foreground.

post-45-1089649638_thumb.jpg


"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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Here is a wider shot of the LToC discussion.

post-45-1089649825_thumb.jpg


"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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Mike hands the mic off to someone during the LToC discussion.

post-45-1089649882_thumb.jpg


"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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In a memorable, strange encounter, Peter's supper is interupted by this young, uh, comedian.

post-45-1089650040_thumb.jpg


"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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And this is Peter, being asked by the aforementioned comic to say "Fe fi fo fum" 3 different ways.

post-45-1089650114_thumb.jpg


"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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And one shot from the OTR concert -- Karin:

post-45-1089650192.jpg


"Could we ever know each other in the slightest without the arts?"

« Nous connaîtrions-nous seulement un peu nous-mêmes, sans les arts? »

Quoted on Canada's $20 bill; from Gabrielle Roy's novel La montagne secrète. The English translation, The Hidden Mountain, is by Harry L. Binsse.

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Guest Russell Lucas

First is Alan discussing The Last Temptation of Christ, with Russell sharing a moment with Doug C (not pictured) in the foreground.

As you can see, The Last Temptation is a comedy.

And I think Crow got a ton of shots of OTR. Standing ones from a good vantage point.

I know this because I was sitting directly behind him. wink.gif

Edited by Russell Lucas

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And I think Crow got a ton of shots of OTR.  Standing ones from a good vantage point.

I know this because I was sitting directly behind him. wink.gif

I have a few Cstone pics of OTR, Lost Dogs, and The Alarm, that I can post on my web page, when I have time to get to it. My personal favorite is the Lost Dogs leading the audience in "rapture practice". biggrin.gif

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Great fotos and captions. Two things. I always thought Russell looked like a happy version of his avatar. In the "cross examination" shot, he sort of does.

Among we longtime members, who'd have thought that Peter and Doug would be so cheerful together? The Millenium has started! laugh.gif


"During the contest trial, the Coleman team presented evidence of a further 6500 absentees that it felt deserved to be included under the process that had produced the prior 933 [submitted by Franken, rk]. The three judges finally defined what constituted a 'legal' absentee ballot. Countable ballots, for instance, had to contain the signature of the voter, complete registration information, and proper witness credentials.

But the panel only applied the standards going forward, severely reducing the universe of additional basentees the Coleman team could hope to have included. In the end, the three judges allowed about 350 additional absentees to be counted. The panel also did nothing about the hundreds, possibly thousands, of absentees that have already been legally included, yet are now 'illegal' according to the panel's own ex-post definition."

The Wall Street Journal editorial, April 18, 2009 concerning the Franken Coleman decision in the Minnesota U.S. Senate race of 2008.

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Heh, crackhead is more like it. biggrin.gif

Cool photos Mike! How'd you get the Cremaster people to lend you their touring vehicle? What a fitting background, the perfect touch i think.

-s.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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I also find it quite amusing that you waited til the day i was wearing a Christian t-shirt before you took any pics. Coincidence??

(What, you got a problem with Skinny Puppy??)

It's getting late... I think i'm von stroheiming tonight. Better get a move on...

-s.

PS and for any newbies that show up here first, please disregard any references to "DW" and "FW" figures in film. It's all a joke. Really, no one here is that ignorant.


In an interstellar burst, I am back to save the Universe.

Filmsweep by Persona. 2013 Film Journal. IlPersona.

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