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Peter T Chattaway

John Wick

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I think I heard that this film got great feedback at... Fantastic Fest, was it?

 


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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So he plays a hitman who goes on a rampage of revenge because somebody killed his puppy?! How can I not see this?


Oh, and here's Twitch's review from Fantastic Fest:

 

It's made, purely and simply, for the action-movie crowd, the type of people -- like me! -- who want to sit back and relax while everyone on screen is beaten or smashed or shot to a bloody pulp. And it accomplishes all that with a bit of style and a dash of cheek, which makes the movie go down easy, like a shot of cheap whiskey that rolls around in the mouth before burning its way, pleasantly, down.

"I feel a nostalgia for an age yet to come..."
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A puppy is killed as its titular owner watches. The death occurs off-screen and we later see the emotional John carrying its lifeless body. The scene is brief and likely shock dog-caring viewers.

 

CUT TO:

 

Fandango application opened on electronic device.  "Purchase tickets" box illuminated.

 

*CLICK*

 

Note: this wasn't funny enough for one thread.  It's really not funny enough to be in two threads.


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Back when the Book of Lists was a thing, I was saving up to submit a list for consideration of their next volume: "Man's Best Friend No More: Movies Where the Dog Dies." I remember I got up over 30 titles and this was the late 80s. Too bad I never followed through. The only ones I remember today are National Lampoon's Vacation, The Thing, Old Yeller, and one of the Dirty Harry movies. (Oh, which makes me think of Clint Eastwood which reminds me of...Pale Rider). Oh, and one or both of the Mad Max movies...it's been years. 

 

P.S. Tyrannosaur

 

P.P.S. Figures...there's an app for that: http://doesthedogdie.com/

Edited by kenmorefield

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Funny Games (EURO) and Funny Games (US)

The Thing is pretty distinctive in that it dies, transforms and assumes the head-form of Richard Dysart

Cujo, obv.


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Saw it. It rocks, dead dog and all. The first half-hour is especially great, although I got the sense the visual approach was riffing on samurai films or other Asian cinema I wasn't overly familiar with. Extremely stylish, which makes the violence -- something I've grown very wary of in movies -- go down easy.

 

I suppose that might be considered a problem or contradiction, but it's one I was happy to wrestle with while watching this aesthetically pleasing film.


"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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I saw this back in September and really enjoyed it. My brother Aren did too and wrote this essay on the film, "John Wick and the Violent Beauty of Action Choreography."

 

 

Back in August I bemoaned the state of the American action scene. I wrote that the action scenes found in modern American blockbusters lacked inventiveness, too often relying on shaky-cam and whizbang editing over skilful camera movement and choreography. John Wick refutes everything I wrote in that essay. It has the best action scenes in an American film in years, possibly since a certain sci-fi film also starring Keanu Reeves. If other American action films can emulate John Wick, there may yet be hope for the American action scene.

 


"A director must live with the fact that his work will be called to judgment by someone who has never seen a film of Murnau's." - François Truffaut

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Reviews and essays at Three Brothers Film.

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I suppose that might be considered a problem or contradiction, but it's one I was happy to wrestle with while watching this aesthetically pleasing film.

 

That was exactly my reaction. This was fun and imaginative in a way that few action movies - certainly American ones - are these days. Aren's essay nails this, though since it doesn't mention the humor it might give a slightly misleading impression of the film as a whole.

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"What matters are movies, not awards; experiences, not celebrations; the subjective power of individual critical points of view, not the declamatory compromises of consensus." - Richard Brody, "Godard's Surprise Win Is a Victory for Independent Cinema," The New Yorker

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