Jump to content
Nick Alexander

The A&F Top 100 is great. Too bad you can't show them.

Recommended Posts

Hi...

 

I am doing research in preparation for a resource I am creating for church youth groups.  The premise of the resource is to provide unique ideas to help challenge youth and young adults today.  One of those ideas is to create a movie marathon night, but with many films that adorn the Vatican 45, or the A&F 100.

 

If one were to do this in someone's home, no problem.

 

If, however, this was done at a church hall, or the youth group room, or a weekend retreat house, then you would be in need of a specific public showing license, or you will be breaking copyright.  To obtain a public showing license, it will cost money, and if you charge to show it, it will cost a little bit more.

 

The video counterpart of CCLI provides a license to show movies.  So does swank.com.  But here's the kicker... neither of them have a substantial number of these films in their roster (Ordet, The Decalogue, The Passion of Joan of Arc, etc).

 

The friendly folks at swank.com then said that if they do not have such films, be sure to check the Library of Congress.  I told them that they are foreign titles, decades old.  Then, they said that I would have to contact the distributor directly, overseas, perhaps in a letter.  If, perchance, we were to make it happen, we would have to wait for permission, pay overseas, including fees for currency exchange.

 

This process overly complicates a simple task.  And it inhibits the event organizer from making this an event on a grand scale.  Films like Ordet and the Decalogue would be fantastic to show, but it will be greatly limited.

 

Unless, you are able to cram all interested parties into one's home.

 

Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I took a workshop lead by the late Doug Adams of Pacific School of Religion he told of trying to get licenses. He was a stickler for making sure it was legal.  His best story was about trying to get a license to show a commercial. People at the company, ad agency, etc had never heard of licenses. As he explained that he need to know how much they would charge, someone finally said, "You realize we usually pay people to show this." They were more than happy to have him use if for free.

 

Moving to another story, this one from Marjorie Suchoki of Claremont Theological Seminary and the organizer of the Whitehead Film Festival. A couple of years ago she wanted to show Gold and Copper, an Iranian film.  She tried to sent money to the company in Iran--but the US forbade it. She tried to go through a middleman in another country--still no go. Finally got a way to send the money, but they couldn't send the film. But there was a copy in Australia that someone had shown there. She paid to get it shipped here and was able to show it at the festival. (It is excellent, by the way.) But then, she couldn't send the film back to Iran. Until someone else needs the print, it is living in a closet somewhere at CTS. It also ended up costing about $1000 to show that film. Yes, it can become very complicated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Attica   

Lots of churches and various other organizations already have licenses, so you should be able to show some films there without much extra trouble or expense.  In my understanding you'll be awfully hard pressed to find a license that would cover all of the films you would want to show, being when they are released through so many different companies.  I don't know that there are any licenses that would allow for all, and if there were I'd expect they would be awfully expensive.  

 

What you might be able to do is to have showings in different churches (or organizations) throughout, that is if they had differing licenses which would make it possible to screen different films in each venue.  It wouldn't make you life any easier, but it might allow for a wider range of films without having to buy several licenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of churches and various other organizations already have licenses, so you should be able to show some films there without much extra trouble or expense.

 

What I'm saying is that the licenses offered to these churches to show movies, do not include those very licenses needed to play the aforementioned films of the A&F100.

 

But I can play God's Not Dead.

Until someone else needs the print, it is living in a closet somewhere at CTS.

 

It also ended up costing about $1000 to show that film.

That is a great, sad, story.  I've never heard of it, but would someone need to fork over $1000 to them to see it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably not since you wouldn't have to pay to ship it from Australia (only from California). The issues of dealing with the government to allow you to send money to Iran is another problem.  And then of course, once you get the film you're stuck with it until someone else hears about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×