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Peter T Chattaway

Frozen 2

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Link to our thread on Frozen (2013).

 

Did Idina Menzel let the cat out of the bag?

 

While Disney's TV and straight-to-video divisions have produced a number of sequels over the years, to say nothing of the sequels Pixar has been churning out lately, so far Disney's feature animation division has produced only three sequels in its roughly 80-year history: The Rescuers Down Under (1990), Fantasia 2000 (1999) and Winnie the Pooh (2011). So at their once-a-decade pace, we're not really due for another Big Disney sequel for another six years at least.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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But these days, when a movie makes ALL THE MONEY like Frozen did, there has to be a sequel.

 

The title better be Fro2en.


It's the side effects that save us.
--The National, "Graceless"
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Well, whether there's a full-fledged sequel or not, Disney *did* announce the other day that a short called Frozen Fever will play before the live-action version of Cinderella next year.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Funny, just the other day I read an interview with the directors, who said they couldn't think of any new ideas after Frozen Fever (the short film that plays before Cinderella this week). And now I get *this* press release:

 

Winter weather ahead! Frozen 2 is officially in development at Walt Disney Animation Studios with directors Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee and producer Peter Del Vecho, the Oscar®-winning filmmaking team behind Frozen.

 

The news was announced at Disney’s Annual Meeting of Shareholders this morning by Bob Iger, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Walt Disney Company; John Lasseter, Chief Creative Officer of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios; and actor Josh Gad, who provides the voice of Olaf from Frozen.

 

“We enjoyed making Frozen Fever so much and being back in that world with those characters,” said John Lasseter. “Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck have come up with a great idea for a sequel and you will be hearing a lot more about it and we’re taking you back to Arendelle. We are so excited about that.”

 

A release date and production details are yet to be announced.

 

This would be Big Disney's... fourth feature-length sequel, I think. The others being The Rescuers Down Under, Fantasia 2000 and Winnie the Pooh. (Disney has produced a number of other sequels under its other divisions, but those aren't produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios per se.)

 

The others ones all underperformed at the box office. Maybe Frozen 2 will be different? More like a Pixar or DreamWorks sequel?

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Funny, just the other day I read an interview with the directors, who said they couldn't think of any new ideas after Frozen Fever (the short film that plays before Cinderella this week). 

 

In the very broadest possible sense of "any new ideas," I assume. (I've seen "Frozen Fever.")


“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.” — Flannery O'Connor

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Some preliminary thoughts on the sequel (copied from Letterboxd):

 

Quote

 

In what must be the most misleading of all pull quotes, I will say I think this marginally better than the original. 

But revisiting the original was a disconcerting experience. The characters seem underdeveloped and uninteresting. "Let it Go" is indeed a showstopper, but it as also a show killer. Once it stops -- and that song comes earlier in the film than I had remembered -- the show never starts again. 

Mostly, though, the emotional palette seems blunt for a Pixar film. In comparison to Toy Story, Wreck-It-Ralph or even Inside Out (of which I wasn't even as big a fan as some others), the emotional impact seems blunted. More so than most of the best Pixar's FROZEN felt, in retrospect, celebrated for what it was about (sistahood) rather than for how well it was executed.

(Aside--I was totally enthusiastic about what it was about, which may explain to myself why I was enthusiastic about it on initial release.)

But the limitations of the original are brought into stark relief by the fitful attempts to get the new film started. Yes, there are some attempts at continuity--Anna arguing that her sister promised to let her in--but mostly this is about plot. The challenges both sisters faces are external, not internal, and in that way in plays more like a superhero/comic book film than a Disney one. 

There are also real obvious attempts to replicate the original through music. The power ballad, Olaf's silly song, etc. Cristoph's song is this weird sort of MTV style ballad that, like so many of the songs here stops the action while we have a song rather than developing plot or character through it. It's song as exposition when we've already had dialogue as exposition.

That said, once the quest is underway, I did find it mildly more interesting than the deceptions that provided the structure for the original Frozen. And the film LOOKS gorgeous. I've always been a bigger fan of hand-drawn animation and prefer a more cartoonish rendering of the characters, But as stand-alone set pieces, Elsa running across water or fighting fire  has an iconic sublimity. 

So, yes, I was entertained, but no it doesn't live up to impossible expectations. 

 

 

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kenmorefield wrote:
Mostly, though, the emotional palette seems blunt for a Pixar film. In comparison to Toy Story, Wreck-It-Ralph or even Inside Out . . .

Wreck-It Ralph and Frozen II are Disney films, but not Pixar films. (That may be a meaningless distinction in light of how John Lasseter was running the show at *both* studios when these films were greenlit, but still.)


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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10 minutes ago, Peter T Chattaway said:

kenmorefield wrote:
Mostly, though, the emotional palette seems blunt for a Pixar film. In comparison to Toy Story, Wreck-It-Ralph or even Inside Out . . .

Wreck-It Ralph and Frozen II are Disney films, but not Pixar films. (That may be a meaningless distinction in light of how John Lasseter was running the show at *both* studios when these films were greenlit, but still.)

That's a fair point. Thanks for the correction.

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I had almost no expectations--well, a couple of my musician friends had told me it was better than the first one, so I suppose I was hoping they'd be right--but I thought this delivered in spades.

https://catholiccinephile.wordpress.com/2019/12/23/frozen-ii/


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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