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Peter T Chattaway

Oscars 2015 - nominations

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Here's the rundown of feature-length nominees, by film, with the films I've seen in bold:

 

9 nominations

 

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) -- Picture, director (Alejandro G. Iñárritu), original screenplay, cinematography, actor (Michael Keaton), supporting actor (Edward Norton), supporting actress (Emma Stone), sound editing, sound mixing

The Grand Budapest Hotel -- Picture, director (Wes Anderson), original screenplay, cinematography, production design, costume design, makeup and hairstyling, film editing, original score

 

8 nominations

 

The Imitation Game -- Picture, director (Morten Tyldum), adapted screenplay, actor (Benedict Cumberbatch), supporting actress (Keira Knightley), production design, film editing, original score

 

6 nominations

 

American Sniper -- Picture, adapted screenplay, actor (Bradley Cooper), film editing, sound editing, sound mixing

Boyhood -- Picture, director (Richard Linklater), original screenplay, supporting actor (Ethan Hawke), supporting actress (Patricia Arquette), film editing

 

5 nominations

 

Foxcatcher -- Director (Bennett Miller), original screenplay, actor (Steve Carell), supporting actor (Mark Ruffalo), makeup and hairstyling

Interstellar -- Production design, original score, sound editing, sound mixing, visual effects

The Theory of Everything -- Picture, adapted screenplay, actor (Eddie Redmayne), Actress (Felicity Jones), original score

Whiplash -- Picture, adapted screenplay, supporting actor (J.K. Simmons), film editing, sound mixing

 

4 nominations

 

Mr Turner -- Cinematography, production design, costume design, original score

 

3 nominations

 

Into the Woods -- Supporting actress (Meryl Streep), production design, costume design

Unbroken -- Cinematography, sound editing, sound mixing

 

2 nominations

 

Guardians of the Galaxy -- Makeup and hairstyling, visual effects

Ida -- Foreign language film, cinematography

Inherent Vice -- Adapted screenplay, costume design

Selma -- Picture, original song

Wild -- Actress (Reese Witherspoon), supporting actress (Laura Dern)

 

1 nomination

 

Begin Again -- Original song

Beyond the Lights -- Original song

Big Hero 6 -- Animated feature

The Boxtrolls -- Animated feature

Captain America: The Winter Soldier -- Visual effects

CitizenFour -- Documentary feature

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes -- Visual effects

Finding Vivian Maier -- Documentary feature

Glen Campbell... I'll Be Me -- Original song

Gone Girl -- Actress (Rosamund Pike)

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies -- Sound editing

How to Train Your Dragon 2 -- Animated feature

The Judge -- Supporting actor (Robert Duvall)

Last Days in Vietnam -- Documentary feature

The Lego Movie -- Original song

Leviathan -- Foreign language film

Maleficent -- Costume design

Nightcrawler -- Original screenplay

The Salt of the Earth -- Documentary feature

Song of the Sea -- Animated feature

Still Alice -- Actress (Julianne Moore)

The Tale of the Princess Kaguya -- Animated feature

Tangerines -- Foreign language film

Timbuktu -- Foreign language film

Two Days, One Night -- Actress (Marion Cotillard)

Virunga -- Documentary feature

Wild Tales -- Foreign language film

X-Men: Days of Future Past -- Visual effects

 

A couple of ultra-quick observations:

 

The Best Picture winner, it seems, will be Boyhood, The Grand Budapest Hotel or The Imitation Game, since those are the three films that were also nominated for their directors, screenplays and film editing. (I suspect Birdman was snubbed for film editing because of its one-take-ness.)

 

The Hobbit has suffered the same fate as the Star Wars prequels, inasmuch as the third film in the effects-heavy trilogy -- a trilogy that was made as a follow-up to an earlier trilogy that was widely celebrated for its groundbreaking effects -- wasn't nominated for its effects *at all*, though it did get a consolation nomination (makeup for Revenge of the Sith, sound editing for The Battle of the Five Armies).

 

Two Days, One Night was nominated for best actress, but not best foreign language film.

 

The Lego Movie was nominated for best original song, but not best animated feature.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Only nine films have won best picture without being nominated for editing. They are:

 

It Happened One Night (1934)

The Life of Emile Zola (1937)

Hamlet (1948)

Marty (1955)

Tom Jones (1963)

A Man for All Seasons (1966)

The Godfather Part II (1974)

Annie Hall (1977)

Ordinary People (1980)

 

While Birdman still has a long shot, and a better shot than Selma, I think the race is really down to the three films Peter mentioned, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Boyhood, and The Imitation Game. I expected the first two, and while I liked The Imitation Game, the support it's getting from the academy surprises me.

 

ETA:

I was inclined to give The Grand Budapest Hotel the edge, because it has a cinematography nom while Boyhood does not, but looking at past awards results, there have been 31 times when the best picture winner was not nominated for cinematography, the last two being 12 Years a Slave and Argo. So, I think Boyhood is still the frontrunner.

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Between *Birdman*,*Budapest* and *Boyhood* (I don't count anything Miramax-related as having any significant chance), I think *Budapest* has all the momentum.  Plus, it's the one that may appeal most to the over 50+ demographic (even though *Birdman* is more Hollywood-centric). 

 

But then again, it may be nothing more than hoping that it wins, over the overrated *Boyhood* and the not-yet-seen-by-me *Birdman*.


Nick Alexander

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Between *Birdman*,*Budapest* and *Boyhood* (I don't count anything Miramax-related as having any significant chance), I think *Budapest* has all the momentum.  Plus, it's the one that may appeal most to the over 50+ demographic (even though *Birdman* is more Hollywood-centric). 

 

But then again, it may be nothing more than hoping that it wins, over the overrated *Boyhood* and the not-yet-seen-by-me *Birdman*.

Oh, I hope it wins too, but I think Boyhood has a lot more support than I want to give it credit for.

 

FWIW, my ranking of the best picture nominees, having not yet seen American Sniper is:

 

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Selma

Birdman

The Imitation Game

Whiplash

American Sniper

Boyhood

The Theory of Everything

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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The Academy Awards have been growing further and further apart from the box office over the past decade or so. The only Best Picture nominee this year that has a shot at grossing $100 million -- or even just $60 million -- is American Sniper, which goes into wide release this weekend.

 

Other observations:

 

There were no nominations for either of the year’s big Bible movies — not even for Patti Smith’s theme song for Noah, which got a Golden Globe nomination.

 

The Grand Budapest Hotel has more nominations than all previous Wes Anderson films combined. Prior to this, The Royal Tenenbaums and Moonrise Kingdom were nominated for their screenplays, while Fantasic Mr Fox was nominated for best original score and best animated feature. None of those films won.

 

Similarly, Boyhood has more nominations than all previous Richard Linklater films combined. Prior to this, Before Sunset and Before Midnight were nominated for their screenplays, and that was it. Neither film won.

 

Every film directed by Alejandro G. Iñárritu has been nominated for at least one award now. Prior to Birdman, Amores Perros and Biutiful were nominated for foreign language film, 21 Grams and Biutiful were nominated for their actors, and Babel was nominated for seven awards (of which it won one, for original score). . . .

 

This is the second year in a row in which there are no Pixar nominees. That’s partly because Pixar didn’t release any feature-length films, but it’s also because their short film Lava — which did qualify for an award — was left off the Oscar shortlist. . . .

 

X-Men: Days of Future Past, which is the seventh film in the X-Men franchise, is also the first film in that series to be nominated for anything — namely visual effects. . . .

 

I also suspect (though I haven't confirmed this yet) that Rosamund Pike is the first Bond girl to be nominated for an Oscar *after* making her Bond film (not counting Kim Basinger, who went from the "unofficial" Bond film Never Say Never Again in 1983 to winning Best Supporting Actress for L.A. Confdential in 1997). Pike's Die Another Day co-star Halle Berry won her Oscar *before* completing her Bond film. (Oh, and I guess there's always Judi Dench, who has been nominated *seven times* since her first appearance as M in Goldeneye in 1995 -- and of course, she actually *won* the Oscar for 1998's Shakespeare in Love. She's not what you'd normally think of as a "Bond girl", but she once said her husband liked to say he was married to a Bond girl, so there's that.)

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Oh, hadn't thought of this: Steve Pond, re: Foxcatcher:

 

A director nod without a corresponding picture nod has never happened since the Academy expanded the latter category in 2009.

 

Also:

 

“Selma” can stand with “The Tree of Life,” “Amour” and “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” as only the fourth movie to be nominated for Best Picture after failing to gain any nominations from the Producers Guild, Writers Guild (for which it was ineligible), Directors Guild and Screen Actors Guild.

 

Also:

 

Steve James must have done something really bad to somebody important in the Academy.

 

The acclaimed documentary director was famously snubbed when his 1994 film “Hoop Dreams,” which was considered a lock to win Best Documentary and a potential Best Picture nominee, wasn’t even nominated. He was snubbed again when “The Interrupters” didn’t even make the Oscar shortlist in 2011.

 

But this year, James had what seemed to be a sure bet for a nomination: “Life Itself,” his affectionate but incisive film about the late film critic Roger Ebert. It seemed likely to lose to “Citizenfour,” but at least James was finally going to get his nomination – a fact that Ebert, one of those who cried the loudest when “Hoop Dreams” was snubbed, would have loved.

 

Instead, “Life Itself” wasn’t nominated, and the Steve James snub now stands at 21 years and counting.

 

Scott Feinberg:

 

Foxcatcher and Interstellar, meanwhile, become the films with the most nominations but no best picture nom (five) since, you guessed it, another film by the enigmatic Christopher Nolan, The Dark Knight, the snub of which led to the expansion of the best picture Oscar category in the hope of increasing the diversity of the nominees. . . .

 

DuVernay, meanwhile, becomes the eighth woman to direct a film that received a best picture nom but not a best director nom. . . .

 

It's the first Oscar nom for Carell, but the third consecutive year in which Cooper has received one, something only nine other male actors have ever done: Spencer Tracy (1936-38), Gary Cooper (1941-43), Gregory Peck (1945-47), Marlon Brando (1951-54), Richard Burton (1964-66), Al Pacino (1972-75), Jack Nicholson (1973-75), William Hurt (1985-87) and Russell Crowe (1999-2001). Not bad company. . . .

 

Best supporting actor . . . The Judge's Robert Duvall (an Oscar winner in the lead category 31 years ago and now, at 84, the oldest person ever nominated in this category, surpassing Hal Holbrook, who was 82 when he was nominated for Into the Wild). . . .

 

Virunga (which makes this the second year in a row in which a Netflix-distributed doc is nominated, following last year's The Square, and also, believe it or not, becomes the second doc about the Congo's Virunga National Park to be nominated in this category, following 1966's Le Volcan interdit) . . .


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I also suspect (though I haven't confirmed this yet) that Rosamund Pike is the first Bond girl to be nominated for an Oscar *after* making her Bond film (not counting Kim Basinger, who went from the "unofficial" Bond film Never Say Never Again in 1983 to winning Best Supporting Actress for L.A. Confdential in 1997). Pike's Die Another Day co-star Halle Berry won her Oscar *before* completing her Bond film. (Oh, and I guess there's always Judi Dench, who has been nominated *seven times* since her first appearance as M in Goldeneye in 1995 -- and of course, she actually *won* the Oscar for 1998's Shakespeare in Love. She's not what you'd normally think of as a "Bond girl", but she once said her husband liked to say he was married to a Bond girl, so there's that.)

 

I checked this list on IMDB, and while there were a couple Golden Globe winners, one BAFTA nominee, none were nominated for an Oscar other than Pike and Berry. Kim Bassinger is not included in the list.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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The Best Picture winner, it seems, will be Boyhood, The Grand Budapest Hotel or The Imitation Game, since those are the three films that were also nominated for their directors, screenplays and film editing. (I suspect Birdman was snubbed for film editing because of its one-take-ness.)

I don't think people should rush to discount Birdman - as you noted, it was probably ignored in the editing category because of its one-take gimmick. If it didn't have that gimmick the lack of an editing nod would probably signal death, but as it's a highly unusual case the end result must surely be more uncertain. It's worth pointing out that of all the films it has the most acting nominations, which can sometimes count for a film; it gives it added gravitas in the minds of the voters. At this point in time I'd place it second in the Oscar race, but only just behind Grand Budapest Hotel (which would be my personal choice out of all the likely winners...) 

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Tim Gray @ Variety:

 

-Meryl Streep extended her Oscar record with a 19th nomination, this time for “Into the Woods.” The actors with the runner-up number of noms are Katharine Hepburn and Jack Nicholson, who have 12 each.

 

-With “American Sniper,” Bradley Cooper becomes the 22nd actor to earn three consecutive nominations. The last two were Russell Crowe and Renee Zellweger. Bette Davis and Greer Garson hold the record, with five consecutives. . . .

 

-This is the first year that all five contenders for music score are not American. Aside from the French Desplat with his two nominations, they are Hans Zimmer, “Interstellar” (Germany); Gary Yershon, “Mr. Turner” (U.K.); Johann Johannsson, “The Theory of Everything” (Iceland). . . .

 

-The nom for Glen Campbell and Julian Raymond for “I’m Not Gonna Miss You,” from “Glen Campbell…I’ll Be Me,” marks the third time in nine years that a song bid came from a documentary. Previous contenders: 2006, Melissa Etheridge’s song from “An Inconvenient Truth” (which won) and 2012 J. Ralph’s tune from “Chasing Ice.”

 

-Roger Deakins (“Unbroken”) and Colleen Atwood (“Into the Woods”) have earned the most noms of any living person in cinematography and costume design, respectively. He scored his 12th and she has her 11th.

 

Jeff Sneider:

 

Fox Searchlight led all distributors with 20 nominations thanks to “Birdman,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel” and “Wild,” while Sony Pictures Classics’ 18 nominations were the most in the company’s history. . . .

 

Cartoon Brew:

 

Another observation: For the time in twenty years, the majority of the animated short nominees have a woman director (or co-director) at the helm, including, in my opinion, the strongest film in the category, Daisy Jacobs’s mixed-media effort The Bigger Picture.

 

And finally, for now: the documentary *about* Roger Ebert may have been snubbed, but a documentary *directed by* the nephew of Gene Siskel was nominated.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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David Poland:

 

Alexandre Desplat has only gone without an Oscar nomination for a Score in two of the last eight years. And this year, he got his seventh and eighth nominations. That is the freaky part. Two nominations in the same category in one year. And you know what’s really freaky? It’s not actually that odd. In the 30 years since the score award became a single award, there has been a double-nominee nine times. Eight of those times have been John Williams. He won the Oscar on none of those occasions. The only other person to do it, before today, was James Horner, and he, too, lost. He also becomes the third person in history to get 8 Oscar nominations for Score without a win. The other two are cousins Randy Newman and Thomas Newman. (Randy’s won twice for Song, but never for Score.)

 

Oh, interesting! I wonder who won in the years that these double-nominees lost... actually, it turns out the situation's a bit more complicated than Poland lets on...

 

In the past *40* years, Williams has been double-nominated for "original score", period, seven times -- and he actually won once:

 

-- 1978 -- John Williams, nominated for Star Wars -- WHICH WON -- and Close Encounters of the Third Kind

-- 1985 -- John Williams, nominated for The River and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, lost to Maurice Jarre for A Passage to India

-- 1988 -- John Williams, nominated for Empire of the Sun and The Witches of Eastwick, lost to Ryuichi Sakamoto, David Byrne and Cong Su for The Last Emperor

-- 1990 -- John Williams, nominated for Born on the Fourth of July and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, lost to Alan Menken for The Little Mermaid

-- 2002 -- John Williams, nominated for A.I. Artificial Intelligence and Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, lost to Howard Shore for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

-- 2006 -- John Williams, nominated for Munich and Memoirs of a Geisha, lost to Gustavo Santaolalla for Brokeback Mountain

-- 2012 -- John Williams, nominated for War Horse and The Adventures of Tintin, lost to Ludovic Bource for The Artist

 

However, there was a brief period about 20 years ago when the original score award was separated into "dramatic" and "comedy" awards again, and Williams was nominated for each of those awards in 1996 and could, in theory, have won both:

 

-- 1996 -- John Williams, nominated for Nixon (dramatic) and Sabrina (comedy), lost to Luis Bacalov for Il Postino and Alan Menken & Stephen Schwartz for Pocahontas

 

Prior to his win for Star Wars, Williams was also double-nominated once, and nominated simultaneously in different score categories a couple of times:

 

-- 1970 -- John Williams, nominated for Goodbye Mr Chips (musical) and The Reivers (not-a-musical), lost to Lennie Hayton & Lionel Newman for Hello, Dolly! and Burt Bacharach for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

-- 1973 -- John Williams, nominated for Images and The Poseidon Adventure (both dramatic), lost to Charlie Chaplin & Ray Rasch & Larry Russell for Limelight

-- 1974 -- John Williams, nominated for Tom Sawyer (original song score) and Cinderella Liberty (dramatic), lost to Marvin Hamlisch for The Sting and The Way We Were

 

Meanwhile, James Horner was nominated in 1996 for Apollo 13 and Braveheart (both dramatic) and lost to Luis Bacalov for Il Postino, just as Williams did.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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The Best Picture winner, it seems, will be Boyhood, The Grand Budapest Hotel or The Imitation Game, since those are the three films that were also nominated for their directors, screenplays and film editing. (I suspect Birdman was snubbed for film editing because of its one-take-ness.)

I don't think people should rush to discount Birdman - as you noted, it was probably ignored in the editing category because of its one-take gimmick. If it didn't have that gimmick the lack of an editing nod would probably signal death, but as it's a highly unusual case the end result must surely be more uncertain. It's worth pointing out that of all the films it has the most acting nominations, which can sometimes count for a film; it gives it added gravitas in the minds of the voters. At this point in time I'd place it second in the Oscar race, but only just behind Grand Budapest Hotel (which would be my personal choice out of all the likely winners...) 

 

My stance seems vindicated by the PGA & SAG awards. I think Birdman is currently slight favourite, although Boyhood can't be far behind. I actually think it's between these two for now.

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The Best Picture winner, it seems, will be Boyhood, The Grand Budapest Hotel or The Imitation Game, since those are the three films that were also nominated for their directors, screenplays and film editing. (I suspect Birdman was snubbed for film editing because of its one-take-ness.)

I don't think people should rush to discount Birdman - as you noted, it was probably ignored in the editing category because of its one-take gimmick. If it didn't have that gimmick the lack of an editing nod would probably signal death, but as it's a highly unusual case the end result must surely be more uncertain. It's worth pointing out that of all the films it has the most acting nominations, which can sometimes count for a film; it gives it added gravitas in the minds of the voters. At this point in time I'd place it second in the Oscar race, but only just behind Grand Budapest Hotel (which would be my personal choice out of all the likely winners...) 

 

My stance seems vindicated by the PGA & SAG awards. I think Birdman is currently slight favourite, although Boyhood can't be far behind. I actually think it's between these two for now.

I'd say you're probably right, although we'll know for sure next week after the DGA, which I still think is more likely to go to Linklater or Wes, although Inarritu is certainly a possibility.

 

If that split happens (PGA and SAG go to one film, DGA to another) the academy usually aligns with the DGA, e.g. 2006 - Little Miss Sunshine won the SAG and PGA, The Departed won the DGA.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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So far the Academy has sorted last year's films almost exactly the same way I've been guessing they would, as I've been adding them on Letterboxd ( http://letterboxd.com/robinwoodpdx/ - btw, that's not my usual experience).  My own top ten choices are always quite a bit different from theirs, though, except for maybe one or two.  I'm going to add 'Timbuktu' as my guess to win Best Foreign Film even though I still haven't had a chance to see all the other nominated foreign films (or documentaries, for that matter--2014 produced a pretty good crop of documentaries even though at least half of them were highly biased).

Edited by Lynn He

Art affirms all that is best in man—hope, faith, love, beauty, prayer…what he dreams of and what he hopes for.  What is art?  Like a declaration of love: the consciousness of our dependence on each other.  A confession.  An unconscious act that nonetheless reflects the true meaning of life—love and sacrifice.

~Andrei Tarkovsky

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Supposedly this supercut includes footage from *all* of the Oscar nominees. So... let's see...

 

 

Omitting second, third, etc. clips from films that have already been listed:

 

-- Don't recognize the first clip.

-- BIG HERO 6

-- INTERSTELLAR

-- THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

-- Don't recognize the fifth clip.

-- TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT

-- Don't recognize the shot of the American flag... or is that part of FOXCATCHER.

-- Don't recognize the wolf in the snow.

-- IDA

-- THE IMITATION GAME, right? (with the pins on the board?)

-- TIMBUKTU, I think, if I remember the trailer correctly.

-- THE JUDGE

-- GONE GIRL, I think?

-- AMERICAN SNIPER

-- I'm guessing NIGHTCRAWLER cuz those look like Gyllenhaal's eyes

-- SELMA

-- HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2

-- BIRDMAN OR (THE UNEXPECTED VIRTUE OF IGNORANCE)

-- THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

-- Don't recognize that one dancing couple.

-- I want to say that the kids kissing on the roof of that building are from BOYHOOD, but I can't recall.

-- MR TURNER

-- Don't recognize that overhead shot of the spinning woman.

-- THE BOXTROLLS

-- Don't recognize that black-and-white shot of the man taking his hat off.

-- WHIPLASH

-- THE TALE OF THE PRINCESS KAGUYA

-- LEVIATHAN

-- Don't recognize the woman with the hand on her head.

-- Don't recognize the woman running into the water.

-- INHERENT VICE

-- Don't recognize the close-up of the hand spilling ash or whatever at the 1:39 mark.

-- UNBROKEN

-- Don't recognize the hands passing an envelope around the 1:59 mark.

-- Or the shot of a woman choking up that follows it.

-- STILL ALICE

-- Not sure if I recognize the "God shot" of the woman on the roof of that building around the 2:21 mark.

-- WILD

-- SONG OF THE SEA

 

So... assuming documentaries and short films are off the table, these are the films I didn't recognize in there (the ones I have seen are in bold):

 

Into the Woods -- Supporting actress (Meryl Streep), production design, costume design

Guardians of the Galaxy -- Makeup and hairstyling, visual effects

Begin Again -- Original song

Beyond the Lights -- Original song

Captain America: The Winter Soldier -- Visual effects

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes -- Visual effects

Glen Campbell... I'll Be Me -- Original song

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies -- Sound editing

The Lego Movie -- Original song

Maleficent -- Costume design

Tangerines -- Foreign language film

Wild Tales -- Foreign language film

X-Men: Days of Future Past -- Visual effects

 

Is it safe to guess that Best Original Song nominees are off the table too?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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-- Don't recognize that overhead shot of the spinning woman.

-- Don't recognize the woman running into the water.

Both Into the Woods. The first is Cinderella getting the dress and slippers, the second is Rapunzel running to her prince after the Witch banished her to the swamp.


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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-- Don't recognize the wolf in the snow.

 

That's the fox scene from Wild.

 

I thought I remembered that from the Wild trailer, but I wasn't sure.

 

:Peter T Chattaway wrote:

 

:THE JUDGE

-- GONE GIRL, I think?:

 

There's a cut to Nightcrawler (close up of Gyllenhaal driving) in between them.

 

:Don't recognize that black-and-white shot of the man taking his hat off.:

Ida, digging up the grave.

 

:Don't recognize the woman with the hand on her head.:

Gone Girl.

 

: Don't recognize the hands passing an envelope around the 1:59 mark.

-- Or the shot of a woman choking up that follows it.:

The woman choking up is Unbroken. I think the envelope is too, but I'm not sure.

Edited by Evan C

"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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Evan C wrote:
: Both Into the Woods.

Joel Mayward wrote:
: That's the fox scene from Wild.

 

And not only have I seen both films, I even have the screeners! Oh well.

 

Evan C wrote:
: : Don't recognize that black-and-white shot of the man taking his hat off.:
: Ida . . .

 

That's what I would have guessed, but the aspect ratio seemed wrong to me. Maybe I should have looked closer. (I haven't seen Ida yet. It's on my Netflix to-do list.)

 

So it looks like, in addition to short films, documentaries and movies nominated for best original song, the supercut also leaves out films that only had nominations for costume design, visual effects, makeup and sound editing. I assume at least two of the clips I didn't recognize come from Tangerine and Wild Tales (neither of which I've seen), then? I mean, the supercut does include foreign-language film nominees Leviathan and Timbuktu (and Ida, but that film also has a cinematography nomination).

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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How good are the BAFTAs at predicting the Oscars? Birdman won the SAG ensemble award as well as the PGA and DGA awards (i.e. it won the awards handed out by the actors', producers' and directors' guilds), so it would seem to be the clear front-runner as far as the Oscars are concerned at this point. Does Boyhood winning the BAFTA necessarily put the brakes on that?


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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I don't know if this has come up in this thread yet, but Jared asked a question on Facebook that prompted me to do a little digging, namely how rare is it for a film like Selma to be nominated for Best Picture and only one other award. The answer is: this is the fourth time it has happened in the last six years, since the Best Picture category was expanded from five nominees to a potential ten.

 

The previous such films are:

 

The Blind Side (2009) -- nominated for Best Picture and Best Actress. It won Best Actress.

A Serious Man (2009) -- nominated for Best Picture and Best Screenplay. It won neither.

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (2011) -- nominated for Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor. It won neither.

 

Thankfully, I didn't have to check back any further than that, because in our thread on the 2010 nominations (for films released in 2009), there was this tidbit:

 

The Blind Side and A Serious Man received the least amount of nominations for a Best Picture nominee since Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994). That film's second nomination was for Original Screenplay . . .

 

So that takes us back over two decades. Don't really feel the need to check back any further than that right now, but maybe later.

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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Exhibit 2536 in why Birdman will win: http://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2015/02/21


"Anyway, in general I love tragic artists, especially classical ones."

"Even the forms for expressing truth can be multiform, and this is indeed necessary for the transmission of the Gospel in its timeless meaning."

- Pope Francis, August 2013 interview with Antonio Spadaro

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The Kindlings Muse 2015 Oscars show: My conversation with Dr. Jeff Keuss, Jennie Spohr, and Anna Miller... including predictions, wishes, reviews, and an audience Q&A.


P.S.  I COULD BE WRONG.

 

Takin' 'er easy for all you sinners at lookingcloser.org. Also abiding at Facebook and Twitter.

 

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Here's one more stat: ten Best Picture nominees have earned over $300 million in North America, including this year's American Sniper.

 

Of the other nine films, three won (Titanic, The Return of the King and Forrest Gump).

 

The six that did not win include a Titanic follow-up (Avatar, which lost to The Hurt Locker) and two Lord of the Rings instalments that pointed towards the film that *did* win in the end (The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers, which lost to A Beautiful Mind and Chicago respectively), as well as Star Wars (which lost to Annie Hall), E.T. (which lost to Gandhi) and Toy Story 3 (which lost to The King's Speech but won Best Animated Feature).

 

Not sure if this helps us predict anything this year, but there ya go.


"Sympathy must precede belligerence. First I must understand the other, as it were, from the inside; then I can critique it from the outside. So many people skip right to the latter." -- Steven D. Greydanus
Now blogging at Patheos.com. I can also still be found at Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. See also my film journal.

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