Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Peter T Chattaway

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Recommended Posts

Links to our threads on Spider-Man 2 (2004), Spider-Man 3 (2007), The Amazing Spider-Man (2012), The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014), Captain America: Civil War (2016), Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) and the in-development films about The Sinister Six, Venom and Aunt May.

Links to our threads on the original Spider-Man (2002) at the old Novogate discussion board:

- - -

Phil Lord and Chris Miller Making All-Animated Spider-Man Film
Animation’s hottest creative duo, Phil Lord and Chris Miller, will make an all-animated Spider-Man movie that is due in theaters on July 20, 2018. The surprise announcement was made tonight during the Sony presentation at CinemaCon in Las Vegas.
Lord and Miller, who most recently directed The Lego Movie, will also write and produce the film. . . .
Lord and Miller previously directed Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs for Sony Pictures Animation (SPA). It is unclear from the announcement whether the Spider-Man feature will be made under the SPA umbrella, though based on Lord and Miller’s feelings about how the division has been run in the past, one might guess that they won’t be too eager to engage with the division’s bureaucracy for this latest superhero venture.
Cartoon Brew, April 22

Edited by Peter T Chattaway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone know of an explanation/defense of the visual style? As much as I liked the movie overall, parts of it felt like I was watching a 3D movie without the glasses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tyler, I don't have a defense, but my wife and I noted the same and I wrote pretty much what you just said on my comment card. I opined that it might be a function fo being 3D ready which often creates the out-of-focus effect, but my wife said no, because the standee in the theater lobby looked just like it. Combined with the super-quick editing, the film gave me a headache. I enjoyed the story, but I found the film itself unwatchable. Will be interesting to see if I ever revisit it on DVD if it has the same effect. 

Oddly, it was the second film I've seen in the last week--along with At Eternity's Gate, that appeared to be deliberately out of focus in parts. (The Schnabel film we assumed was to mimic how Van Gogh saw???)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find the animation style to be revolutionary and amazing. I saw it in 2D and can’t wait to see it in 3D as soon as possible. I know Jeff Overstreet and others feel similarly. 

There are tons of defenses and raves about the visual style. Walter Chaw of Film Freak Central (in a brilliant review the filmmakers singled out for high praise) very perceptively links the film’s visual style to its sci-fi premise, emotional themes, and moral outlook: 
 

Quote

A game-changer. It's American anime, essentially, an Akira moment for our film art that will sooner or later be identified as the definitive event where everything tilted forward. I hope sooner. More than beautiful, it's breathtaking. More than kinetic, it's alive. And more than just alive, it's seething with possibilities, self-awareness, a real vision of a future in which every decision in Hugh Everett's quantum tree produces an infinite series of branches. It's a manifestation of optimism …

Spider-Verse tells his journey with animation and graphic design that's indescribable and stunning. The creative team sees Brooklyn as an infinite probability curve: the city is impossibly vibrant, impossibly huge. There's too much to see, though you try. It evokes somehow the feeling of visiting New York for the first time--a nexus between something eternal and the future unfolding…

Spider-Verse is an instant classic, not for visuals that will, after all, only be singular until the next ground is broken, but for the tremendous care it's taken in finding Miles's heart and then things to fill it, break it, strengthen it…

Let me tell you about another scene: Miles has met the new girl in class, Gwen (Hailee Steinfeld), and as he tells Uncle Aaron about her later, he tries to hide his excitement, but can't. In a movie of huge moments and literal rifts in reality expressed in splashes of paint and motion, it's these little observational touches that align it with the great Japanese masters. Miles runs through a series of facial expressions--embarrassment, excitement, curiosity, caginess--and his uncle does the same. They move around on the couch and the directing trio knows where to put the camera. And in the end, as his uncle teaches Miles how to make a very innocent move on Gwen, there's a brilliant, true moment of shared elation between them.

 

Edited by SDG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loved this film. I keep trying to think of negative aspects or weak points, and the only one I can muster is that its visual style might be off-putting for some (which is confirmed by the comments I read above) and that its pacing might be pretty quick. But it never felt frenetic, and I *loved* the visual style here. It pushes the boundaries of animation even as it's a celebration of all that animated film (and the comic book medium) is all about. It's a great superhero film, a great coming-of-age film, a great action film, a great comedy, a great ensemble film, a great New York City film, a great sci-fi film, and (it goes without saying, but I'll say it) a GREAT animated film. There is SO much here without being TOO much.

Edit: This could also be considered a Christmas film! All the main events occur during the Christmas season.

Edited by Joel Mayward

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My companion and I found the movie kind of dark (or muddy) in the early sections, but it really pops at the climax, which exhibits a creativity that's sadly lacking in most superhero outings these days.

I loved this movie to death. Best superhero movie of the year--sure. Best Spider-Man since 2? Almost certainly. But here's what's interesting: it feels like its own thing. The best parts of Homecoming felt like they had been ripped from the Raimi films. This one--even when it directly quotes the Raimi films--never feels like anything except itself. And itself is very good indeed.

Oh, and forget the lamentable 

Mandy, *this* is the Nic Cage performance of the year

Edited by NBooth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NBooth wrote:
:
The best parts of Homecoming felt like they had been ripped from the Raimi films. This one--even when it directly quotes the Raimi films--never feels like anything except itself.

Well put.

This is the only animated movie in theatres right now that my kids haven't seen yet, and I hope to rectify that soon, as the press screening was in 2D and I really, really want to see it in 3D.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a treat!  However, there were several moments where I thought we’d rented the 3D disc and had no glasses.  That effect was off-putting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...